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  • DustyQOTF
    replied
    Originally posted by Andi64 View Post

    furrymama Bones on the compost heap are a no-no. They do not really decompose well, think of what they dig out of the ground sometimes, and they attract unwanted, nevertheless furry, dinner guests.
    it depends on what type of composting you are doing. there are certain systems of composting that will allow you to compost bones https://bovees.com/can-you-compost-b...ost%20tumbler. this post talks about it more traditional compost is a huge no no since they dont get hot enough for the bones. If your cheap and rather make the compost on your own and let nature take its course do not add anything from meat or dairy from what i understand.

    sorry wanted to get this in.. im not great at cooking so i dont experiment

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  • HazelRoze1226
    replied
    Tonight I made a really good chicken, avocado and feta cheese salad with fresh spinach. It was easy to make, and fueled me up for my bedtime exscersises .

    Tommorow night I'm going to try Chicken, cucumber and feta salad with some chopped up pistachios and olive oil avocado dressing.

    I'm playing around with salads this week Since last week was all about soup broth and homemade stews

    I did however try out the homemade bone broth with my bone in chicken and it was really really Delicious.

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  • thinman
    replied

    One of my fave salads is a simple cucumber salad . . .


    Click image for larger version

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  • HazelRoze1226
    replied
    I lately have been cooking my chicken with a mayo made up from avocado 🪔 oil and it has been Coming out great. I've been trying to keep the dinners at night quick and simple. So lots of salmon, 🐟, avocado chicken ,eggs and cheeses with some 🥦 cauliflower and spinach for some sides or stir fried.

    Leave a comment:


  • thinman
    replied
    When I marinated chicken or turkey breast meat in ranch it was from frozen bought, tried it with fresh chicken breast and they was dry. Normal I always bought breast with skin and bone and roasted in the oven and was always juicy and tender. When I was working I cooked chicken thighs with skin and bone for sandwiches, very tasty. The advantage of skin and bones is the fat and gelatin left behind which is used in varies dishes.

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  • HazelRoze1226
    replied
    Thank You Andi64 this weekend I am cooking up some bone broth 🦴 🍲.

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  • Andi64
    replied
    Making broth/soup is very easy and makes your kitchen/home a better place, esp. in winter. I love the smell of soup cooking on the stove.
    I got really good at making it, because I do that about once a week in winter. I use the broth for various soups (e.g. French onion soup, another olfactory delight), or to cook other meats in, like for goulash and such.
    I freeze some of it in an ice cube container. After roasting a piece of meat, dissolve a cube or two in the used hot pan and loosen the brownish bits on the bottom with it: Instant gravy.
    As PetiteSheWolf pointed out, a couple of hours is the right cooking time for broth made from bones. If you roast the bones before boiling you'll get a darker and tastier broth.

    Here is a step by step guide (using the metric system) to making bone broth:
    I take ~1,5kg veal bones, some (3-4 depending on size) marrow-bones and if I feel fancy, half a kilo of chicken trimmings (stomachs, necks, wings...).
    Give the bones a quick rinse and into the large (~5 liter) pot, with some vegetable oil, they go for a quick browning roast, then bones out (the chicken trimmings in, roast and out again, if using) then some rough cut veggies in: 2-3 medium carrots (lately too sweet for my taste, I use their yellow sisters now instead), a halved onion (for nicer color of the soup, blacken the onion in a dry pan on the cut sides, no need roasting it then. Leave some of the brown skin on anyway), some celery-stalks, a leek, parsley roots... No need to peel the roots, just give them a good scrub.
    Back in the pot goes everything and fill it with cold water.
    Rule of thumb: 1kg bones/meat = 2 liters water. Bring to a boil, scratch of the residue from the bottom of the pan with a wooden spoon and skim off the greyish foam if you want. No harm if you leave the foam alone. It's just protein. It will dissolve by itself after a while, The soup will be stronger if you leave it in, it gets a bit more murky (cloudy?), though. Since I am not running a fancy restaurant I leave it in.
    After the foam dissolved/skimmed off, it's time to add the herbs. Thyme, some peppercorns, a clove of garlic, a laurel leaf, pimentos, some juniper berries, lovage. The usual suspects. Putting them in a muslin or a tea egg is an excellent idea PetiteSheWolf
    Let it boil on the smallest flame possible for 5-6 hours. I leave the pot open and replace the evaporated water now and then, otherwise the pot gets too hot in my setup.
    In the end, fish out the largest parts and boil it down to 2 liters, filter through a kitchen sieve and muslin/gauze. Leave to cool (overnight), throw away the hardened fat on top.

    Voila, broth/stock/jus. If it wobbles, when you take it out of the fridge, you get a ​.
    From here on it's up to you and your taste:
    • add a bit of Madeira/Sherry,
    • put a nice piece of meat in and make a stew like Tafelspitz or similar:oxtail, chuck...
    • clear it with egg whites or mince and end up with a nice consomme...
    • add noodles, ramen or dumplings ...
    Do not forget the chives in the end.

    You can use meat instead of bones.Another rule of thumb: If you want to eat the meat afterwards (like forementioned Tafelspitz or stew) bring the water to a boil first, then add the meat so more flavour stays in the meat. If using cheaper cuts, that you might recycle in a salad or discard at all, cold water is the way to go.
    Unfortunately, like with the proverbial cake, you cannot have a good soup AND nice tasty meat. I go for cheap cuts or bones for the broth and nicer cuts for the actual stew.
    Use pork bones, they'll get you a slightly sweeter soup, but with very nice distict taste.

    Just try it. It's very satisfying to eat a home made soup on a cold winter evening.
    Since you are boiling out the very essence of your ingredients, try to get organic ones.

    All the best
    Andi

    furrymama Bones on the compost heap are a no-no. They do not really decompose well, think of what they dig out of the ground sometimes, and they attract unwanted, nevertheless furry, dinner guests.

    Leave a comment:


  • PetiteSheWolf
    replied
    I do mostly as furrymama 's husband does, I put the bones (no skin) of the chicken in my crockpot along with water , thyme, laurel and herbs of the same family that are underhand (herbs in a muslin or tea bag to take them out oafter) , at low setting, for a few hours, Then I take the remaining bones (cartilage will have dissolved) and herbs out, and either let it cool for later use, or immediatly dump soaked beans and a few veggies in the broth and let it simmer another few hours until beans are done. Tada, tasty bean soup!

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  • furrymama
    replied
    HazelRoze1226....it is SUPER easy. He puts the bones, and the skin/fat, in a pot on the stove, covers the bones with enough water, then boils for what seems like about 30 minutes. Then he lets it cool completely. I think he pitches the bones in the trash after that, but I'm curious if they are compostable.

    Leave a comment:


  • HazelRoze1226
    replied
    furrymamai have heard about homemade bone broth before I do love a good broth. , Keeps you hydrated and is good for you. So I will give this a try is it easy to make ???

    Leave a comment:


  • furrymama
    replied
    @thinman---when it comes to chicken and any other animal proteins with bones, what my husband does is once we are done with eating the "meat", he will boil down the bones into a broth. That way, we are getting as much out of that food item as we can.

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  • thinman
    replied
    My fave stir-fry I order at a neighbourhood Thai Cafe Bistro is Drunken Noodle, it has chicken breast in it and thought they should of marinated it since it was dry pieces, tofu would have been better.
    Attached Files

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  • thinman
    replied
    Having turkey breast pieces marinated in Ranch dressing, plus a vegetable Indian curry sauce (from a pouch) on extreme long grain parboiled Basmati rice, plus mixed Parisian style veg from frozen.

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  • furrymama
    replied
    When it comes to soups, I usually just start with a recipe (bean and broth based usually) and just add what I have in my home or whatever sounds good. Usually, it comes out pretty good. I will occasionally use the prepackaged soup mixes, but not the seasoning (because it's WAY too salty for me). I add my own spices.

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  • HazelRoze1226
    replied
    I love 🥒 salad with.tomatoes , and I also add 🥑. One of my favorites..Since starting a keto./.Paleo diet plan bacon is a must and I tend to like a little bit more flavor than coconut oil gives so I have been using bacon 🥓 grease. Chicken and potatoes are two good comfort foods for me but I have cut back on starch been trying more sweet potatoes usually once a week . I have put on my grocery list the chicken and ranch recipe looking forward on trying it.

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