Beyond Meat

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    Beyond Meat

    My supermarket now has "Beyond Meat" for the first time here in Canada, usually only restaurants had it. But the store package of 2 burgers were much thicker than the restaurant versions I've had. The store burgers were very good, thick and juicy, but quite expensive at $7.99, compared to lean ground turkey, a 1LB/450G package $4.
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    #2
    Beyond Meat and Impossible Burger have received a lot of news coverage, here in the USA over the past couple weeks. I haven't tried either, yet. Thanks for the brief review!

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      #3
      As another price compare, we bought a package of 4 fresh sage and onion turkey burgers 450g at a different store for $5.99, made by a local quality place. Beyond Meat are going to have to lower their price if they want to convince meat eaters to buy the product, since they have it in the meat section and not the vegan/vegetarian area.

      Bought 4 fresh lean Angus beef patties, each 142g/5oz 27g protein for $8. Actual 100% beef burger taste like actual beef and texture, Beyond is better than the soy burgers which give me an odd chemical taste.

      I was in a small town the other day, a supermarket for rural folk that doesn't have even tofu or vegan meat substitute had a whole pile of Beyond Beef frozen, not sure if they'll sell any. This place doesn't even have tofu and last time I saw a veggie burger there it was on sale for 50 cents coz nobody would buy such. But will see if the price drops a lot, should be ok since they smartly froze it.

      I'm not a Vegan or Vegetarian but will eat at such restaurants, go to Vegetarian pot-lucks etc. I did do a Vegan challenge that went on for 6 months then another 6 months Vegetarian.

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        #4
        Originally posted by thinman View Post
        My supermarket now has "Beyond Meat" for the first time here in Canada, usually only restaurants had it. But the store package of 2 burgers were much thicker than the restaurant versions I've had. The store burgers were very good, thick and juicy, but quite expensive at $7.99, compared to lean ground turkey, a 1LB/450G package $4.
        Click image for larger version

Name:	large_2bed1194-c004-44cb-91e2-3fde62ec6cf5.jpg
Views:	238
Size:	213.4 KB
ID:	578286


        I love beyond meat because of the stock lol. I have yet to try their burgers. I'm a meat eater but have no problem eating or trying veggie burgers. Look forward to it.

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          #5
          The current price point is rather a problem for me. In order of importance to me when shopping, especially for groceries my values look something like - Price/thrift > health/nutrition > taste/freshness/craving > ethics/local econ > convenience > novelty/drinks

          BM (from a marketing standpoint, that abbreviation was a bad idea) can't compare with beef/pork/chicken from a price perspective. Anybody on any kind of budget simply cannot afford to eat this.

          From a health standpoint, again, I hate their marketing. They're really pushing themselves as a health food and that "20g protein, soy free, gluten free" on the front is accurate, but... kinda misleading. They're not outright SAYING "compare us with meat!" but connotation is important. You know what kind of burger patty is soy/gluten free and packs 30g+ of protein? Beef. BM is also fairly high in fat by comparison. I don't think BM is particularly UNhealthy, just not the nutritional powerhouse they want folks to assume. From a strictly nutritional standpoint, meat wins handily.

          Taste-wise, I got several packs of BM from my local store's clearance rack (lol nobody in this area even wanted to try it) for less than half the normal price. They're pretty good. I like Beyond Sausage more than Beyond Burgers. If you go in with the mindset of "this is a meat replacement, it'll be just as good!" you probably won't like it. If you're an adventurous eater and just like to try different things in the food world, it's a solid meal. Slight chewiness but not unpleasant. Substantial, filling, combines well with flavors you'd expect to pair it with. I have no complaints from a taste/texture standpoint. I'd even recommend it if this were the only concern.

          Convenience, it's no more or less so than buying meat, so tied on this front.

          And novelty - it's good, but it ain't THAT good. Novelty only gets the first sale, you can't build a repeat customer on novelty alone.

          Ethically, plants are always gonna be a slam dunk vs. beastflesh. Pea protein? You don't gotta import that from disadvantaged communities half a globe away. Bamboo is basically a weed. Potato starch? It is to laugh. The most ethically compromising ingredient might be the coconut oil, and really... ehhhh, at that point it's negligible/nitpicking. Far and away BM's biggest legit selling point is that it's a more positive ethical buy and it's not even a contest. The problem is that it's 2019. All but the most die hard hippies can't financially afford to go full Walden Pond and live strictly according to values. Sure, the case to be made here is for more local green grocers, but realistically go to whichever grocery store you hit up for most of your food and I challenge you to walk out with a product NOT made by Kraft, Kelloggs, Nestle, Coca-Cola, PepsiCo, Mars, General Mills, or Unilever. Wealth/power is so consolidated these days that a handful of companies up top own every other company that makes every other product you encounter. Even if you try to avoid them, you're buying from a subsidiary and that feeds the top.

          My point is that while ethics is BM's big score, it practically doesn't matter because poor people buy for price - busy people buy for convenience - epicures buy for pleasure and satisfaction, etc. People who buy strictly for ethics are a very small niche market.

          I wish BM were the product of my dreams that could be cheap/healthy/delicious/ethical all at once but it isn't by a longshot. I hope it softens consumers up to meat alternatives which is gonna increase demand, ultimately reduce cost, and necessitate further innovation. Realistically though, I see BM getting bought by one of the bigger companies inside of 10 years and existing as a placeholder without really tilting the scales in any significant way.

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            #6
            Restaurants here in Canada will have a BM burger on their menu's, I had one yesterday. Since getting back into Yoga I started choosing more Vegan. Fast food chains here also Have BM, the likes of Tim Horton's breakfast BM sausage and egg sandwich and also the same at Canadian A&W.

            Generally Vegan restaurants don't have this BM kind of stuff, one chain I went to https://eatcopperbranch.com/menu/ was really groovy.

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