Beyond Meat

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    Beyond Meat

    My supermarket now has "Beyond Meat" for the first time here in Canada, usually only restaurants had it. But the store package of 2 burgers were much thicker than the restaurant versions I've had. The store burgers were very good, thick and juicy, but quite expensive at $7.99, compared to lean ground turkey, a 1LB/450G package $4.
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    #2
    Beyond Meat and Impossible Burger have received a lot of news coverage, here in the USA over the past couple weeks. I haven't tried either, yet. Thanks for the brief review!

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      #3
      Originally posted by thinman View Post
      My supermarket now has "Beyond Meat" for the first time here in Canada, usually only restaurants had it. But the store package of 2 burgers were much thicker than the restaurant versions I've had. The store burgers were very good, thick and juicy, but quite expensive at $7.99, compared to lean ground turkey, a 1LB/450G package $4.
      Click image for larger version

Name:	large_2bed1194-c004-44cb-91e2-3fde62ec6cf5.jpg
Views:	634
Size:	213.4 KB
ID:	578286


      I love beyond meat because of the stock lol. I have yet to try their burgers. I'm a meat eater but have no problem eating or trying veggie burgers. Look forward to it.

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        #4
        The current price point is rather a problem for me. In order of importance to me when shopping, especially for groceries my values look something like - Price/thrift > health/nutrition > taste/freshness/craving > ethics/local econ > convenience > novelty/drinks

        BM (from a marketing standpoint, that abbreviation was a bad idea) can't compare with beef/pork/chicken from a price perspective. Anybody on any kind of budget simply cannot afford to eat this.

        From a health standpoint, again, I hate their marketing. They're really pushing themselves as a health food and that "20g protein, soy free, gluten free" on the front is accurate, but... kinda misleading. They're not outright SAYING "compare us with meat!" but connotation is important. You know what kind of burger patty is soy/gluten free and packs 30g+ of protein? Beef. BM is also fairly high in fat by comparison. I don't think BM is particularly UNhealthy, just not the nutritional powerhouse they want folks to assume. From a strictly nutritional standpoint, meat wins handily.

        Taste-wise, I got several packs of BM from my local store's clearance rack (lol nobody in this area even wanted to try it) for less than half the normal price. They're pretty good. I like Beyond Sausage more than Beyond Burgers. If you go in with the mindset of "this is a meat replacement, it'll be just as good!" you probably won't like it. If you're an adventurous eater and just like to try different things in the food world, it's a solid meal. Slight chewiness but not unpleasant. Substantial, filling, combines well with flavors you'd expect to pair it with. I have no complaints from a taste/texture standpoint. I'd even recommend it if this were the only concern.

        Convenience, it's no more or less so than buying meat, so tied on this front.

        And novelty - it's good, but it ain't THAT good. Novelty only gets the first sale, you can't build a repeat customer on novelty alone.

        Ethically, plants are always gonna be a slam dunk vs. beastflesh. Pea protein? You don't gotta import that from disadvantaged communities half a globe away. Bamboo is basically a weed. Potato starch? It is to laugh. The most ethically compromising ingredient might be the coconut oil, and really... ehhhh, at that point it's negligible/nitpicking. Far and away BM's biggest legit selling point is that it's a more positive ethical buy and it's not even a contest. The problem is that it's 2019. All but the most die hard hippies can't financially afford to go full Walden Pond and live strictly according to values. Sure, the case to be made here is for more local green grocers, but realistically go to whichever grocery store you hit up for most of your food and I challenge you to walk out with a product NOT made by Kraft, Kelloggs, Nestle, Coca-Cola, PepsiCo, Mars, General Mills, or Unilever. Wealth/power is so consolidated these days that a handful of companies up top own every other company that makes every other product you encounter. Even if you try to avoid them, you're buying from a subsidiary and that feeds the top.

        My point is that while ethics is BM's big score, it practically doesn't matter because poor people buy for price - busy people buy for convenience - epicures buy for pleasure and satisfaction, etc. People who buy strictly for ethics are a very small niche market.

        I wish BM were the product of my dreams that could be cheap/healthy/delicious/ethical all at once but it isn't by a longshot. I hope it softens consumers up to meat alternatives which is gonna increase demand, ultimately reduce cost, and necessitate further innovation. Realistically though, I see BM getting bought by one of the bigger companies inside of 10 years and existing as a placeholder without really tilting the scales in any significant way.

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          #5
          Beyond Meat burgers come 2 X 4oz patty's, for the same price I bought soy burgers 6 X 5oz =26g protein and the soy base were very good.

          Ingredients
          Water, soya protein, canola oil, onion, methylcellulose, tomato powder, fructose, corn maltodextrin, salt, soya sauce (soybeans, wheat, salt), malt extract, garlic, spice, beet powder, vinegar, modified corn starch, corn syrup solids, sugar, guar gum, colour, parsley.

          Methyl cellulose is used as an ingredient in some vegetarian burgers that are intended to replicate the texture of meat.
          The position of the FDA is There is no evidence in the available information on methyl cellulose that demonstrates, or suggests reasonable grounds to suspect, a hazard to the public when it is used at levels that are now current and in the manner now practiced. However, it is not possible to determine, without additional data, whether a significant increase in consumption would constitute a dietary hazard.

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            #6
            I don't buy that stuff.

            1. Too expensive.
            2. Too fake - did Mother Nature make that? Noooope.
            3. Too fake = too foreign to my body = probably a health hazzard, if not now then in 10 years.

            To be honest, I blame man-made food and their hyperpalatability for my "food addictions". If I could, I'd want to eat as close to natural as possible... natural meaning that I can recognize it from the natural world.

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              #7
              Thanks to thinman showing me "the game changers" movie trailer, I watched it and in the new year I am going to try to transition to a plant based diet.
              If you haven't seen game changers it's on Netflix and is a great watch.

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                #8
                My wife and I generally eat natural whole foods but stock some things in the freezer like frozen okra, berries, sprouted bread. At the mo we have 4 breaded fish fillets and 2 farm made turkey burgers, a box of falafel . The soy burgers I wanted to test but not a regular part of my diet. We also have canned beans, mixed, black and chickpeas, also a can of mushy peas. We still have some milk and eggs then switch to organic non-gmo soy bev.

                Christmas (and other festivities) we do a potluck with my wife's family and rotate who does the meat, this Christmas we do the meat so will get a turkey roll, they expect meat or will get mad. But we don't have to eat any, our choice.

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                  #9
                  I don't like those vegan burgers and "meat-alternatives", too. Not only are they insanely processed, often they're more expensive per kg than high-quality steak (at least here in Germany). Some of those things are so expensive I technically could import kobe beef from Japan for the same price
                  Also, look at the ingredients of the stuff, for example, the soy burger thinman posted: a lot of sugar-y sources (onion, tomato power, fructose, malt extract, corn syrup solids and sugar). Most of the time, those things basically consist of water, some vegetable oil, maltodextrin (a bulking agent), some form of protein and then come the colours, thickeners and the flavours (okay, the soy burger at least avoids those). And those fancy patties still come in plastic, very eco-minded...

                  And regarding the Game Changers film, Kakarot: James Cameron, the executive producer, just invested ~140 million dollars in pea protein manufacturing (his wife also has some stakes in the industry). I haven't watched the film myself, but keep in mind that you should be cautious when a lot of money is involved. It's good advice to be wary of everything you see in modern media and to enquire a bit yourself as often as possible.

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                    #10
                    Nihopaloa I'll admit the movie sold me on going plant based but about 2 years ago a YouTubeer I watch went vegan for a month to see the effects and she's completely turned because of the benefits to her looks - skin is clearer etc but also ethical reasons too. She even runs a purely vegan gymwear brand clothing line and a vegan gym equipment brand and she's 22.
                    Her YouTube is here if you want to check her out.

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                      #11
                      Like I said, Kakarot, exercising caution when it comes to these things is never a bad idea (as long as you don't go into full paranoid-mode, of course). While I won't call the YouTuber a liar (purely because I don't know her and how authentic she is) I keep in mind that you never know what happens off-screen (for an old example of this, look up Jasmuheen, a prominent Breatharian) and it's always an interesting development when people at one point start a brand of their own (again, financial interests in the background).
                      In the end, you have to try veganism for yourself. From personal stories I know, different people react different to such a big change (coming back to your example with clearer skin, I've also witnessed the exact opposite). While I would never go vegan myself (I love dairy too much) I'd like to encourage you to keep an open mind when you try it out and listen to your body (of which I am sure that you'll do that anyway).

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                        #12
                        Definitely Nihopaloa I'm cautious and like to try these thing out. I own a jump rope made by a YouTubeer and it was a bit more money but it has put up with more abuse than the generics crap in the shop.
                        But I definitely understand to be cautious.

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                          #13
                          When I was 100% Vegan we'd go to proper Vegan restaurants where they make their own patty's from black beans or chickpeas and veg mixture, really good coz they're not trying to replicate meat but make something real tasty and nice. Shredded Shiitake mushrooms have a nice chew and flavour.

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                          Photo: Shiitake mushrooms, organic tamari, teriyaki sauce, green peppers, lettuce, tomato, alfalfa sprouts, special sauce

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                            #14
                            Originally posted by Kakarot View Post
                            Definitely Nihopaloa I'm cautious and like to try these thing out. I own a jump rope made by a YouTubeer and it was a bit more money but it has put up with more abuse than the generics crap in the shop.
                            But I definitely understand to be cautious.
                            Great! Party on, use critical thought, and I hope you have a successful journey on your future path


                            And thinman, I also like vegan dishes like the image you posted. Many people forget that there're so many things you can cook that are vegan, without imitating meat, that are very tasty. For example, my all-time favourite: pasta with tomato sauce! For some weird reason, nobody thinks that's vegan, but if you make the sauce only with tomato paste, water, salt, pepper, garlic and maybe oil, it's as vegan as it can get.

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                              #15
                              I'm a big fan of Indian food which is mostly Vegetarian.

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                              Dal Tadka is a North Indian dal (Lentil stew)

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