Help for a Type ONE Diabetic...?

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    Help for a Type ONE Diabetic...?

    Hello! I'm getting ready to start following the Hero's Diet and working out on my elliptical machine for 45 min-1 hr daily. However, I have type ONE diabetes, the kind most people forget exists, and it is an entirely different disease from the ever-more-popular type TWO diabetes in that food and exercise affect my body in vastly different ways than they affect a type two diabetic's body. Neila, I know you're not an endocrinologist, but I thought I'd take a chance and ask if you had any advice for type 1s like me who are just starting to follow a diet and exercise regimen.

    #2
    Hi and welcome! I'm not an endocrinologist either, but my mom was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes about 10 years ago (yes, in her 50s. Very rare, but still so) and I've learned quite a bit during the whole phase of her coming to terms with it.
    What I have learned second-hand from her is that even every diabetes 1 body responds differently and that not all carbs are created equal. For example, my mom does really well with rice, but sometimes her blood glucose gets out of whack when she eats pasta (both carefully weighed). For her also diabetic neighbor it's the other way around. My parents do a lot of hiking on vacations and it's been a process to figure out how much to decrease her insulin for longer hikes. (If she doesn't decrease it enough, there's of course the possibility of eating something sugary, but apparently it's no fun "having to" eat or drink something sweet when you don't feel like it.)

    I guess in your case the fact that you work out at home and at your own pace will make it easier to listen to your body and get into a routine. But probably changing your diet and increasing your exercise will involve some trial and error and a period of closer monitoring of your blood glucose levels than you normally do. My mom seems to have her life with type 1 figured out pretty well by now, but it's been a process.

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      #3
      secox27, tagging neilarey will send her a notification so she can reply to your question.

      I would recommend injecting your insulin in a part of the body not involved in the activity (elliptical = legs, and possibly arms). A pump can help. If yo exercise after eating, make sure you keep detailed track of your carb grams, your insulin units, and your blood glucose readings before eating, after eating, before exercise, during exercise, and after exercise, including the time of day for those numbers. That will help you and your doctor figure out how to make changes to your insulin.

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        #4
        Nutrition, Diabetes and Fitness: https://darebee.com/fitness/nutritio...d-fitness.html

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          #5
          Yeah, here's my advice: Ask your doctor or a medical professional, not some randos who may or may not claim to be in some sort of medical profession. We can give ideas but we don't know your medical history, how you're impacted by diabetes, and what's going to work for you. Get a good PCP and follow their recommendations.

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