Planning to start running

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    Planning to start running



    I have been stung by Darebee.

    First off, I would like to express my gratitude to Darebee and its members for helping me adding some changes into my life style.

    I always has fears doing any cardio exercises for the reasons I stated in a different thread. However, after finishing HIIT and starting a different cardio program, I have develop the urge, confidence and strength to overcome my fears taking the challenge to a higher level.

    So, I’m planning to start running every weekend. Last time I tried running was 5 years ago and it was an epic failure.

    That’s been said, I’d appreciate some tips to help not failing again. What should I do before and after running, how to plan my weekly new challenge. How to start and when to stop, etc. Note that I’ll be limping because of my inactive left leg’s calf and that I still smoke I hope this decision would help me quit smoking.

    Thank you and have a wonderful weekend!

    #2
    Woohoo! Good for you

    I am also a non-runner, but have been talked into a few races over the last few years so I would suggest start slow and include walking. When I tried to just run I'd get injured or feel like a failure for not being able to do it. So go slow and walk/runs = good start!!

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      #3
      Musical gym Evolutionary biologists/psychologists would tell you that humans are maybe the most well designed species in the world to run long distances. Even well-known running species like horses tire after 60 km whereas humans have proven that distances well over 100km are possible. So in a sense, running is one of the easiest things to do, as our bodies are designed for it in a practical sense.

      The problem is that doesn't necessarily interface with our modern world and the lifestyles that we enjoy. We don't have to go for a hunt or live a nomadic life, running from or chasing after things.

      I used to be a long distance runner but mostly gave it up. It used to form about 98% of what I did fitness wise, but now I aim for an all-round approach. That said, if you have tried to start in the past and failed, you might consider trying a different approach. Since getting back into fitness I have mostly avoided running, but one boxing workout I read suggested a 1 km run before working out. I had tried running a few times when I was 100+ more pounds, and it didn't work, so I was hesitant to try again. The thing was though that I had been working my legs with plyometrics and skipping, and hitting the pool a bunch for my cardio. So when I got back into running a 1km before the workout, it was pretty simple, in fact even without training for it, I was passing most of the people on the track.

      Perhaps a similar approach might work? Focus on short distances for running, make some stops along the way to do 10-15 reps of 1-3 exercises (and to catch your breath) and then keep going. And find another way to boost your cardio, be that HIIT, bicycling, walking or swimming.

      Running is a great exercise though, and a lot of long distance runners will tell you that it has a meditative aspect as well, as runners enjoy pounding the pavement or the trails to clear their minds.

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        #4
        Click image for larger version

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ID:	645157 I can’t believe it! I just did 1km nonstop! Took a 5 min rest and then ran for another km nonstop!




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          #5
          Musical gym which app do you use for tracking your runs?

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by LtGymaholic View Post
            Musical gym which app do you use for tracking your runs?
            I used Adidas running. My BIL told me to use Strava, it’s for runners.

            Comment


              #7
              meggiemagpie CaptainCanuck thank you so much for you input! I started today and I wasn’t expecting such results. I’m now more motivated than ever! ​​​​​​​

              Comment


                #8
                The From Walking to Running program here on darebee is great and how I started.https://darebee.com/running/from-wal...o-running.html

                If you catch the running bug, "Anatomy for runners" by jay Dicharry is a very useful read to understand your running body, and some of the checks and exercises that can help with preventing injury.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Welcome to running! I was a non-runner too: I used to hate it when I was on high school because I was a bit overweight, I always thought I was goofy and had almost no resistance. Then at sixteen I first started practicing martial arts and at twenty I started running. At first, casually and only later with a structured program.
                  Now at 38 (ok, next week) I'm still not much of a runner, but I enjoy it and I'm proud of my very very small result, such as running a 5km in a little more than 30'. I have to say that I'm not very consistent, but in the end I appreciate running as something I thought I could never do but actually I overcame my limits.
                  Hope this will happen for you too, be proud of what you do. Don't forget to stretch (you said you're a bit limping because of your calf) and put your legs on the wall for a couple of minutes after you have run. If your muscles feel sore, you may want to try beetroot juice
                  Have fun!

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by PetiteSheWolf View Post
                    The From Walking to Running program here on darebee is great and how I started.https://darebee.com/running/from-wal...o-running.html

                    If you catch the running bug, "Anatomy for runners" by jay Dicharry is a very useful read to understand your running body, and some of the checks and exercises that can help with preventing injury.
                    Thank you! I like the program, I should follow it.


                    I’ll look up the book. Many thanks!

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Manuela View Post
                      Welcome to running! I was a non-runner too: I used to hate it when I was on high school because I was a bit overweight, I always thought I was goofy and had almost no resistance. Then at sixteen I first started practicing martial arts and at twenty I started running. At first, casually and only later with a structured program.
                      Now at 38 (ok, next week) I'm still not much of a runner, but I enjoy it and I'm proud of my very very small result, such as running a 5km in a little more than 30'. I have to say that I'm not very consistent, but in the end I appreciate running as something I thought I could never do but actually I overcame my limits.
                      Hope this will happen for you too, be proud of what you do. Don't forget to stretch (you said you're a bit limping because of your calf) and put your legs on the wall for a couple of minutes after you have run. If your muscles feel sore, you may want to try beetroot juice
                      Have fun!
                      Running a 5km is a big achievement, you should be proud of yourself

                      My left side is hurting me a bit, I guess it’s because I was limping. I hope it goes my tomorrow because I’m planning to run for another 2 km.

                      thank you for the tip! I like beetroot. Good luck!

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Hey there! So I'm a little late, but I'm super into running myself and it was very much the first exercise that I've found that I want to do more of and hope to continue to improve in over most others.

                        Personally, I would make some basic suggestions, some of which you probably already know or have heard.

                        First, I'd pick a distance or a time amount that you want to run every time while you get used to it. Give yourself a month, two, three to let your body get used to this idea of running. I wouldn't worry about your speed so much as focusing on form right now. Make sure you don't heel strike, hold your spine and head up in a line, breathe deeply from your belly and not your chest. For this first few months or just a month, I would also pick certain days you do it - two or three times a week would be excellent to start and don't feel obligated to push for more days than that if you aren't ready. I personally found the 20x3 running program here specifically helpful, but I'll admit openly that I had already been running semi-regularly by the time I dedicated myself to that one and could go for a solid 20 minutes regardless so I think From Walking To Running that was linked earlier might be a better choice for the moment.

                        Second, feel okay with pausing and walking or doing some quick stretches or maybe even some squats or push ups. Your run does not have to be all at once and you don't have to worry about speed.

                        Third, stretch before and after. Especially given your limp, I would assume that this would be even more important to you than to other runners. It doesn't have to be long - two or three minutes before and after would be fine, but if you feel like you need more definitely go for stretching longer.

                        Fourth (and finally), I would look into other areas of fitness that help with running. Technically it's called cross-training, but essentially there are certain things you can do that specifically help here. I personally suggest yoga just because that one has specifically helped me in finding my breath during running and I'll link some handy videos that feature one of my favorites with some running focused yoga, but you could do this with heading out on hikes once a week, cycling, walking, swimming. I wouldn't necessarily worry about doing all (or any) this now or doing this super seriously, but looking through some yoga videos could also help with learning new stretches you can use.

                        Yoga for Pre-Run
                        Yoga for Post-Run
                        Yoga for Runners (Mental and Physical Stamina Focus)
                        Yoga for Tired Legs [This one is specifically really good for days after a harder run, I've found.]

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by ArtBoyo View Post
                          Hey there! So I'm a little late, but I'm super into running myself and it was very much the first exercise that I've found that I want to do more of and hope to continue to improve in over most others.

                          Personally, I would make some basic suggestions, some of which you probably already know or have heard.

                          First, I'd pick a distance or a time amount that you want to run every time while you get used to it. Give yourself a month, two, three to let your body get used to this idea of running. I wouldn't worry about your speed so much as focusing on form right now. Make sure you don't heel strike, hold your spine and head up in a line, breathe deeply from your belly and not your chest. For this first few months or just a month, I would also pick certain days you do it - two or three times a week would be excellent to start and don't feel obligated to push for more days than that if you aren't ready. I personally found the 20x3 running program here specifically helpful, but I'll admit openly that I had already been running semi-regularly by the time I dedicated myself to that one and could go for a solid 20 minutes regardless so I think From Walking To Running that was linked earlier might be a better choice for the moment.

                          Second, feel okay with pausing and walking or doing some quick stretches or maybe even some squats or push ups. Your run does not have to be all at once and you don't have to worry about speed.

                          Third, stretch before and after. Especially given your limp, I would assume that this would be even more important to you than to other runners. It doesn't have to be long - two or three minutes before and after would be fine, but if you feel like you need more definitely go for stretching longer.

                          Fourth (and finally), I would look into other areas of fitness that help with running. Technically it's called cross-training, but essentially there are certain things you can do that specifically help here. I personally suggest yoga just because that one has specifically helped me in finding my breath during running and I'll link some handy videos that feature one of my favorites with some running focused yoga, but you could do this with heading out on hikes once a week, cycling, walking, swimming. I wouldn't necessarily worry about doing all (or any) this now or doing this super seriously, but looking through some yoga videos could also help with learning new stretches you can use.

                          Yoga for Pre-Run
                          Yoga for Post-Run
                          Yoga for Runners (Mental and Physical Stamina Focus)
                          Yoga for Tired Legs [This one is specifically really good for days after a harder run, I've found.]
                          Great advice here! Thank you so much!

                          im planning to run this evening after work. Now that I know my threshold, I’ll increase my goal 0.5km, 2.5km in total. I’ll run 1.25km, take a rest and then run for another 1.25km.

                          I won’t focus on my speed now, as you have mentioned, I’ll focus on my breath and stamina.

                          Thank you once again, everyone

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Darebee doesn't fail to impress me, ever. I found what I was looking for https://darebee.com/running/half-marathon-training.html as I'm planning to do a half marathon in October. Wish me luck!

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Good luck! I started running more or less regularly in the summer, I'm not very experienced yet either, so I'll eagerly follow your journey.

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