plant based scientific studies

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  • LhBucksb
    replied
    So much useful information, thank you for your comments. Actually, I want to switch to a healthy diet and become a vegan, so I'm interested in this topic. Only I have one question for you, I use cbd oil and cream as a natural remedy for different health issues. Also, I use a vape and don't want to give it up (cause it gives me comfort and relaxation), especially since I recently found cbd cartridges for vape and a cbd vape pen with awesome flavors..you can find them on knockoutcbd.com, so I want to know, can this interfere with my plan to switch to a healthy lifestyle, do you think?

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  • thinman
    replied

    last week had a pain in the shoulder blade area a day after yoga and took a break from the gym. The last week or so had been eating vegan more than usual and some I.F. Today in the gym my strength was way down, normally doing dumbbell curls I start with 40lb for 9 reps then 45lb for 9 reps then 5 reps with the 50lb, yikes today I was hurting do 3 reps with the 35lb DB. Other exercises I wasn't up to scratch.




    Nowadays I eat sensible, what I call normal healthy.

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  • Azercord
    replied
    Damer It does, thank you for the thorough answer as always. Time fore some reading

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  • Damer
    replied
    Azercord good call. First as a primer, just in case you haven't seen it, we covered the gut Microbiome a while back. Now, for your more specific question. A Harvard Gazette article that's directly drawn from a study shows the difference between plant and meat-based diets and the need for diversity, at the very least. Even more interesting one of the authors of that same study cited in the Harvard Gazette, cite how cooking as an activity changes the chemistry of food and how that changed chemistry then changes our gut microbiome. Other studies that show the effects of diet on gut flora (which is what the gut microbiome is) can be found here and here. What is of direct interest to us, because of all this, is the pathway through which the microbiome affects health, wellbeing and even mental efficiency.One of those pathways is the chemical signalling between colonies of bacteria which produces specific neurochemicals which then affect cellular signalling in the body and brain. All this is new and incredibly hard to study because of the ethics involved in experimenting on live humans. So everything is coming in piecemeal as pathological studies and newly devised protocols allow.

    On your comment about your own diet, you're also 100% on-point. It is really difficult to go from a predominantly meat-eating diet to a plant-based diet because your body does not yet have sufficiently large colonies of the microbiota it needs to process plant cellular matter. Everything has to be a step-by-step process and along the way you need to listen to how you feel and reach your own balance. I hope all this helps.

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  • Azercord
    replied
    This stuff also excites me with all the new and continuing info coming out on the gut biome. Like PETERMORRIS966 I'm a huge protein eater (not always meat but I generally sit around 1.2g per lbs body weight) and switching to heavy veggie (or carb as they tend to be) and I start feeling sluggish real fast. I've been eating protein for so long my biome (this is my guess) is just setup to do well with it and switching would be the hard part as it would have to adapt. While this isn't impossible it would just take significant effort and time.

    That all being said I'm really looking forward to the documentary that comes out covering the biome and eating impacts there as well as adaptive responses. Damer if you know any studies along those line could you add them here as well? Or if there is already some article links just send me that direction as I'm seriously behind on the science posts since moving.

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  • Kakarot
    replied
    Well said Rathgar and that is what I plan on doing in the new year.

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  • Rathgar
    replied
    Great thread Kakarot.
    there is a huge amount of information, good and misleading and that produces a huge amount a potentially explosive discussion.
    There is no perfect diet, just the same as there is no perfect workout program or the perfect person. Dont just believe what you read, test it experientially.
    eat more veggies, less meat and more fiber, be your own lab.

    Happy sitting bees. X

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  • PETERMORRIS966
    replied
    Wow! So much information. Even in Canada there are diverse opinions of food. Last year Health Canada updated the Canada Food Guide; which promoted more vegetables, whole grains & less meat. It receive criticism from the Indigenous community & some Asian communities. There was also negative feedback from the food industry, which in turn was criticized as protectionist. Personally, I'm a "meat-asaurus." & have been all my life. Having said that; I know I am better off & feel much better, when I reduce my meat intake & increase vegetables. I try for 5-7 serving of veggies per day.
    Personally, I believe the less processed your food is the better. After all, everything we put in our mouths is either "fighting disease or feeding it."

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  • thinman
    replied
    Krystal Aranyani: Cured CBD oil: CuredNutrition.com Garden on Life Sports Protein Acai Matcha Tea for sleeping-chamomile, valarian root Magnesium Vegan multi vitamin Red Reishi Ashwaganda Ginger Shilajit Nutritional yeast Spirulina Herbal cleansing tea Chia seed Hemp seed Flax seed Oil of oregano

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  • Damer
    replied
    PetiteSheWolf what an experience it must have been and yoru comment made me smile!

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  • PetiteSheWolf
    replied
    Originally posted by Damer View Post
    PetiteSheWolf what is known as the "China-Cornell-Oxford-Project" is still valid because of its methodology and large sample group. Good call to remember it and I am placing a link to it here, for this thread. There is also a video playlist at the Cornell website that can be seen here.
    I had the honor to meet shortly T Colin Campbell , through someone who had worked with him, it was a lovely chat. That brings back good memories. My parents (who were present because the introducer was of my family) were flabbergasted to see that someone promoting vegetarianism could look so, how to say... regular, even classical

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  • Kakarot
    replied
    I've just been reading peoples posts (I haven't looked at all the links though, sorry) but from what I have seen, I had decided that I was going to test myself on a plant based diet in the new year but didn't have any idea on what to do, then the 7 day plant based mealplan was posted and I thought "that looks simple enough" but if the first week goes well (energy is good, not as sluggish and I am thinking about asking my local doctor to test my blood and stuff) then I'll do it for a month (keeping up the monitoring from the doctor).
    I will also be (hopefully) training very vigorously in the new year (the plan has already been updated on my profile but not started) so I may even add to it as I might need extra calories (based on my goal of strength I believe that might need more protein and fat calories).
    I will log everything and also update this thread on my experience, I may do it in weekly segments.

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  • Damer
    replied
    i6Shot thank you for contributing to this discussion. As Ann-Core noted, a contribution on this particular thread requires at least some science-backed evidence-based citation in order to help the validity of opinions and also to add to the educational value of this particular thread.

    Over the past week since my comment on this thread I have been looking at the latest research regarding Omega-3 supplements and the claims around Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA). I now need to add this article on the Omega-3 group and the association studies around it. For the benefit of this thread I note that association studies are essentially correlation studies. This makes them relatively weak when it comes to examining causation. The best study possible in terms of scientific results is a randomized control trial (also known as RCT) where subjects are randomly chosen to receive either a test dosage of what is being tested or receive a placebo (in order to establish a control group within the population being tested). RCT studies, to date, have found it difficult to replicate the positive effects of DHA. Additionally a meta-analysis of studies that combines the results of seventy-nine randomised trials involving 112,059 people challenges many of the ideas around the benefits of omega-3 and DHA.

    I understand that when it comes to scientific studies it is difficult to always understand their importance. Funding, methodology, and the type of study that was carried out influence the validity of scientific findings and what we can practically learn from them. This is why it is important to have these discussions and add to them high-quality research, when possible.

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  • Damer
    replied
    PetiteSheWolf what is known as the "China-Cornell-Oxford-Project" is still valid because of its methodology and large sample group. Good call to remember it and I am placing a link to it here, for this thread. There is also a video playlist at the Cornell website that can be seen here.

    Leave a comment:


  • PetiteSheWolf
    replied
    Just a not random question, is the Cornell China study still considered a reference to document the interest and possibility of vegetarian diet, or it is now long outclassed or by more modern studies, or its methodology called upon? I had found it fascinating, back then.

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