Building strong knees

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    Building strong knees

    I'm about 40 days into running 5x a week and sometimes get light knee pain. Today is the first day I've postponed running but I have been postponing fighter's codex with squats also which hasn't felt great.

    My intuition says:
    - My tendons, ligaments, and fascia are developing more slowly than my ripped muscles =P
    - I should go lighter on running until nothing hurts
    - Maybe fighter's codex is possible but I need to focus on tendons/ligaments etc first
    - My knee was like this before I started running and got better with rest

    My questions:
    - What's your favorite program for tendons/ligaments (in case I put off fighter's codex for stronger days)?
    - What do you do for your knee if it acts up from running?
    - How do you survive taking breaks from running? =P

    #2
    You might be right but I have a question for you too, is your running form good ?

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      #3
      Looking at this I think I could be landing on my heels more than the outer edge of my foot. Looking deeper. Thanks Ryuji!
      https://darebee.com/running/running-form.html

      EDIT: https://www.verywellfit.com/which-pa...unning-2911127

      Proponents of this view say that you want to avoid being a heel-striker. If you land on your heels, you are stopping your forward momentum and causing undue stress on your knees.

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        #4
        Landing on your heels is a sure way to mess up your knees, you might want to slow down a bit and focus on your form

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          #5
          There's no consensus between heel/ball runners. The rate of injury is the same across the board. Anecdotally, I find folks who land on the balls of their feet experience more shin splints. Folks who land on their heels experience more knee pain. I don't think there is a "true" better between them, but which you use def matters. A lot depends on posture, weight, weight distribution, balance, fatigue, yadda yadda. BIOMECHANICALLY, most top-level athletes run front-footed so it seems to be most efficient, but they're going faster and usually have long-long limbs. What's true under those circumstances may not hold true for us mortals.

          If you've got pain, take a few days off. As you ease back into it, just pay attention to the mechanics of what you're doing. Play with form, see what you prefer. I try to land midfoot with a shift forward to engage my toes as I push off the step. That sounds complicated for one step but not once it's burnt into memory. It's what works for me.

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            #6
            As for your tendon strengthening programs Q: the Power Up program on the Darebee front page is good. Challenging at times, but very efficient.

            Comment


              #7
              Before Power Up Program i used these Workouts for tendon strentgh :
              https://darebee.com/workouts/lowerbo...h-workout.html
              https://darebee.com/workouts/upperbo...h-workout.html
              https://darebee.com/workouts/hand-tendons-workout.html
              They are helpful

              Comment


                #8
                I would definitely look into building your tendon strength personally, but beyond that - slow down a little. Work on and be conscious of your form as you run. It's honestly a good idea to hold a sort of meditative focus not just on how your feet are landing, but also the way your back arches, the steps you take in between full belly breaths, how high your knees are coming up from the ground (or treadmill, if that's your vehicle)... You get the idea.

                As far as tendon strength... I'm personally going to advocate for the Power Up! program. While the program in particular doesn't always target legs and it's not exactly one you can make harder if you go back to it multiple times, I'm definitely planning on doing this one at least a few more times just because of how much it's improved some aspects of my own running in such a short time period already. Keep in mind that this program can be challenging despite the short duration of the workouts (the longest I've seen any be was maybe 8 minutes total so far) and I would honestly suggest that you do this at the very end of the workout, perhaps as your cool down.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by oneironaut View Post
                  I'm about 40 days into running 5x a week and sometimes get light knee pain. Today is the first day I've postponed running but I have been postponing fighter's codex with squats also which hasn't felt great.

                  My intuition says:
                  - My tendons, ligaments, and fascia are developing more slowly than my ripped muscles =P
                  - I should go lighter on running until nothing hurts
                  - Maybe fighter's codex is possible but I need to focus on tendons/ligaments etc first
                  - My knee was like this before I started running and got better with rest

                  My questions:
                  - What's your favorite program for tendons/ligaments (in case I put off fighter's codex for stronger days)?
                  - What do you do for your knee if it acts up from running?
                  - How do you survive taking breaks from running? =P
                  Does it hurt on and around the knee cap, or does it hurt on the outside of the knee?

                  Chances are high that it's either IT Band Syndrome or 'Runners knee." If the pain is around the kneecap and it hurts more when you squat or go down stairs it's probably runner's knee. Two positives here: in either case theres likely no structural dmg. Also, you can treat them similarly.

                  Both ailments respond well to consistent strength training but the emphasis should be on the hips - specifically the glute medius.

                  Darebee has a couple of great hip routines that target the glute med. but this is a great place to start. Try completing this 3 times a week or every other day. Over the course of 3-5weeks your pain should decrease. Making these types of exercises a part of your regular str. routine will help prevent common running injuries. I'd also recommend single leg, leg workouts like single leg deadlifts, split squats, single leg squats, single leg calf raises, etc.

                  Single Leg exercises work in three key ways. 1. They strengthen limbs equally. When doing dbl. leg exercises like squats and deadlifts, the stronger leg can act in a compensatory fashion which creates and exaggerates imbalances. That is the stronger leg does more work and continues to get stronger than the other leg. Single Leg w/o force each limb to build STR without compensation.
                  2. They improve balance which is a product of stabilizing muscles and chains being activated and strengthened. This will help you as a runner as it str. ankles, feet, and hip muscles on the stabilizing/opposing leg.
                  3. Single Leg exercises require a lot less weight to build str.
                  Click image for larger version  Name:	hip-dips-workout.jpg Views:	0 Size:	364.2 KB ID:	592931

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Blair thank you so much, this is motivating. I tried some squats as part of the fighter's codex last night and my pain did not return. The pain was, as you described, more around the kneecap with downhill/downstairs hurting.

                    I never really thought about double leg exercise imbalance and that is likely a large factor as I used to skateboard (a while ago, but it meant my left and right legs were kinda getting different workouts).

                    For some reason I was thinking of strength workouts as less-related to my running skills but I will be revising my long term strategy based on this info. Time to take leg day actually seriously. Thanks again!

                    *Going to try to jog this morning after 6 days off. Plan is to get out there focusing on my foot strikes and not try to break any records. I will also walk down all hills today until i can gain a better intuition about how my legs are actually doing and get a new plan in action.

                    EDIT: Walk / jog foot strike testing went well. There's a workout tag trick if you want to embed workouts with image / link quickly. Got Hip Dips bookmarked and just read the description: "The pelvic area joins the lower body to the upper one and, as such, is key to both the transfer of locomotion and the transport of power from lower body muscles to upper ones (and vice versa). Training it is exactly what Hip Dips is designed to do."

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