Pull up negatives with weighted vest help improve numbers?

Collapse
X
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Pull up negatives with weighted vest help improve numbers?

    I'm trying to improve my pull ups and have a 40 lbs vest if I do negatives and really work the muscles hard with that should it help improve my pull up numbers. PS I made this a poll for fun lol thanks anyone reading this! ​​​​
    9
    Yes the weight should help improve
    11.11%
    1
    No it won't have the desired effect
    11.11%
    1
    Go for it and tell us
    77.78%
    7

    #2
    Slow moves with heavy weights will work your fast twitch muscle fiber which will increase your strength. Improving your rep numbers, however, will mostly have to do with endurance, rather than strength. While improving your strength will help to some extent (making the pull ups easier, more explosive) it won't result in very high rep counts.

    But as I said, increasing strength will help to some extent. If you're just able to do one or two pull ups, working on your strength with a vest will definitely help to build up the muscles you need for pull ups and you may bust out 5 or 6 pull ups soon and thus improve your numbers. But if you want to get to the really high numbers you'd need to work on your endurance, which you get by busting out reps again and again and again at a relatively low weight (body weight).

    Comment


      #3
      Oh, maybe you'll be able to do full pull-ups with the vest soon.
      And what better way to brag than to go saying: "Back then I couldn't do even one pull up, but now I do like 20 in a row... with a 40 lbs vest." Though that would mean a broad back and some shirts might not fit you anymore.

      Comment


        #4
        weighted pull ups is a good methodology to increase the number of pull ups, but you should have already a good number of repetitions (i.e. at least 5-6 reps, but 10 is better). On the other hand, to increase the maximum number of reps, you have only to do pull ups, i.e. you have to focus only on the volume of your training. Since you have a low number of reps, it's not significant how you schedule the pull ups in your workout, but it's important how many pull ups you do.

        Obviously, the technique is very important. My two cents, it's better to learn first a clean movement than to think to the number of repetition. Notably, I speak about clean movement, since I have a "calisthenic" vision of exercise, where kipping (i.e. legs swing) is avoided or limited. On the other hand, crossfit pull ups "searches" kipping. Thus, in crossfit it 's important do more reps and nothing else, and pull ups "does'nt" help to gain muscle mass or strength, but principally works on indurance and stamina.

        Comment


        • #5
          Having worked my way up from not being able to do even one pull-up (around October of 2017) to now being able to perform up to 108 strict pull-ups in just under 10 minutes in sets of 20 to 30 (chin over an inch above the bar down to about a 170 degrees measure for the angles of the arms, a bit short of a dead hang) (June of 2019), and having been a CrossFit member for a season, I can tell you that kipping pull-ups are much ado about nothing.

          Feeling happy that one can “do a pull-up” by kipping, getting workouts of 15 to 20 kipping pull-ups in, provides only a small fraction of the benefits that taking a month or two to do lots of lat pull-downs, bicep curls, hanging holds, rows, and other workouts for muscular fitness, and working with a RESISTANCE BAND provide (without the goal of ultimately mastering an actual pull-up). Look, kipping can do wonders for your body, but the marginal benefit of really working to perform true pull-ups renders kipping a truly dispensable beginner’s exercise that should be left behind after a season. For instance, I probably did kipping pull-ups for about a month until I was able to perform a couple of true pull-ups. By the time I hit 10 true pull-ups, kipping was disposed of permanently.

          By the way, doing different kinds of pull-ups to work different muscles and work different sets of muscle fibers. I do wide-grip, supinated, pronated, and close-grip in equal numbers (e.g. 30 wide-grip, 30 supinated, 30 pronated, 18 close-grip in 10”). The 108 pull-ups number is just a quixotic favorite number of mine, no material significance to it for the workout. I always do different grips because diversifying the work one’s muscles do can only be good.

          Biggest one for learning how, becoming capable of performing, a pull-up, is in the use of different strength resistance bands. Depending on your weight start from a strong resistance, say 60 or 80 lbs, and eventually work your way down to 15 lbs and then go free. But the key to excellent and beneficial pull-ups is FORM and CONTROL, activating all the necessary muscles and not allowing yourself to cheat the pulling up by using momentum, as opposed to controlled muscular exertion, to draw oneself up. It’s about the back muscles, really, though the chest and arms are certainly also recruited,

          https://www.pullup-dip.com/pull-ups-vs-lat-pull-down
          Last edited by Samuel De Mazarin; June 11th, 2019, 07:13 PM.

          Comment

          Working...
          X