How much training is enough?

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    How much training is enough?

    Hi bees!

    There is a question in my mind I would like to talk about with you. Since I started with training, I'm very motivated to do my workouts, eat healthy, and so on.
    The problem is, that I want to kickstart my training mostly over the limit, which is definitive too much. So there is these "overtraining"-thing, that comes around, which means that more training doesn't mean more results. Its the negative way then.

    Of course, we're all want to aiming high to get the best results. But "how much training" is enough training and when its getting toxic? In the first days you getting muscle soreness, which tells you "dude, thats too much. slow down". But after some training days the soreness goes away even with hard training and you could train harder. Which is not correct.

    I have to start my journey with 4 challenges together, combined with HIIT sometimes and the High Five Challenge every day. I really think it's too much, but if I remove some of them I think now its to less to getting better.
    Even these Micro-Workouts at rest days, makes me confusing if these are really helpful? The Darebee-Way says you don't need rest days, rest is "on-the-fly" with low workouts. But how are these low workouts helpful?

    On the other hand it's getting deep in my head when I get a workout streak, and if I broke these, I think "shit, I havent trained yesterday. I ruined my line. Now I need to do more training today" (I really know its nonsense, but I have no idea to avoid those thoughts).

    So all in all the real question is: how much training is "neccessary" and when it is okay to do "just nothing", and how to not loose motivation or feel bad?
    Last edited by Surras; September 6th, 2019, 12:39 PM. Reason: some grammar

    #2
    I struggle with this, too. I think the answer is that the right amount of training is the amount you can sustain over the long term, but it takes some trial and error to figure that out. For me, I’ve chosen to prioritize yoga every day, add in 4 days per week of run/walk training, and 2 days per week of weight lifting. I would like weight lifting to increase and running to decrease over time.

    Added to that is a general amount of daily movement. If I’m sitting on the couch all day and doing one workout before bed that isn’t ideal. I will use the Darebee WOD or DD to motivate myself to move, but not to replace a program I’m already doing.

    As with everything else I think it varies by person. Just remember that rest days are where muscle is built, and don’t sit all day.

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      #3
      The question is what is your goal? If you just wanna be fit and healthy, and have to manage your workday with family and everything, the answer will be another, than if you are a single and wanna train for a competition.

      What means, you have to find a way for yourself, to balance all the things you have going on.

      Get Ideas in the "checking in logs" and adapt them to your own life. Try for some time, adapt...and so on...

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        #4
        Originally posted by Surras View Post
        I have to start my journey with 4 challenges together, combined with HIIT sometimes and the High Five Challenge every day. I really think it's too much, but if I remove some of them I think now its to less to getting better.
        For me it is important to identify the main training goal, for example a program that is already a complete workout that lasts 30 days.
        At the main goal, i can remove or add other challenges or extra training but they are always something not necessary.

        Originally posted by Surras View Post
        So all in all the real question is: how much training is "neccessary" and when it is okay to do "just nothing", and how to not loose motivation or feel bad?
        The workout that you like and makes you feel good is enough
        If you follow a 30-day program you already have a good basic training, if you want to do more in the day, so be it, but you already have a well-structured path that leads you to improve.
        It is not a race of speed but of resistance

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          #5
          I shoot for about 45-60 minutes per day most days, 30 minutes at least if it's hectic schedule. I feel like that confers the cardiovascular/overall health benefits and is almost always attainable (little sympathy from me for anyone who says "I don't have time to work out"), but isn't so much that you're exhausted and can't function the rest of the day.

          Ultimately, there is no definitive answer that will apply to all people in all situations. Doctors recommend at least 30 minutes of focused exercise at least 5 days per week, which I think is manageable for most people. That will stave off most major chronic illnesses if paired with a decent diet. How much is too much exercise is much harder to pin down - but I think if you're logging 75+ minutes most days of the week, that will probably be too much for most people and will prove more harmful than beneficial.

          As for motivation: think of your family, your loved ones, your life, your goals, yourself. And if that fails: superheroes.

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            #6
            In terms of your actual physical health, I would say if 1) you haven't scheduled yourself any rest days anywhere or 2) if you're consistently getting yourself injured (not sore or overtired, but injured) you're definitely training too much.

            In terms of your overall well-being, I feel like you're training too much if that's the only thing you do. I sometimes read about people who train for an hour+ EVERY DAY and to me that's just...mind boggling. Don't you have anything else to do? Friends to hang out with? Books to read? People to talk to? Some project to work on? Chores? Laundry???? Your mind needs both rest and the right stimulation as well as your body, and your emotional and social health are just as important as making time for your physical health. Doctors say 30 minutes of moderate activity 5 days a week gets you the best benefits on the bell curve of how good exercise can be for your body, so if that's all I can make time for (or want to make time for), that's good enough for me.

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              #7
              Overtraining happens when you go off too hard, too soon, and too fast. Training needs time to develop, and fitness comes with adaptation. But no one person can answer the question for you. You have to decide for yourself. Some people feel the best at two plus hours a day. Some prefer half an hour three times a week. It depends on your goals, mental and physical.

              But the most important thing to think about is to have fun. Make sure it is fun. Oh, and don't wok out when sick.

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