I dont know how to fight with this reaking laziness!

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    I dont know how to fight with this reaking laziness!

    I have a problem. Probably somebody could think it's not, but I think it is. I am from Russia, from very small town where seems like nothing happens. Thanks God, I had an opportunity to study abroad in China. When I was there everything was easy, I mean, it was easy to train, I didn't have so much laziness. However, I already went back and now Oh my Gosh! I don't know how to fight with this freaking laziness!

    #2
    Berzox1999 you might be feeling low because of the change. I've read somewhere there is an adjustment period whenever you change countries. At first, everything is exciting and new (even if you lived in the country before) but then even small things become a struggle. So what you are feeling is probably normal - or at least expected. I changed countries several times myself and every time, about six months in, I went through such phase. It passes It helps if you celebrate small victories and set small manageable goals for every day, week and month. At least that's what helped me. There might be other bees here who moved countries and had this adjustment period - they may have more ideas!

    Hang in there!

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      #3
      On top of what Neila already said, there may be more to the place where you live than what you already know. Getting to discover a new place is usually stimulating - that's what happened when you got to travel to China. Now you're back "home", it might be worth exploring a little more (even the Internet can help you in this regard). There may be new people worth meeting, new places to find out about... of if you can't find anything you like, why not try to create it yourself, along with a few friends? That can be a good way to get your motivation back.

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        #4
        Russia in January with it's absence of the sun, wind in your face, absolutely spotty snow is a not a great place to seek motivation, actually. Be easy to yourself. It's OK to be lazy in these conditions Get back to work in Spring, for example

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          #5
          Originally posted by Redline View Post
          There may be new people worth meeting, new places to find out about... of if you can't find anything you like, why not try to create it yourself, along with a few friends?
          I second this suggestion.

          I understand the small town blues. I used to live in a city where I had a good community and a lot of things going on. Then I was forced to relocate to a small town with a population approximately 1% of the place I had been living before. "Nothing" goes on here. And the community is socially/politically/religiously very different from me in ways I find appalling. In many ways I will never "fit in" here. But it's where I live, at least for the time being. So I resolved to make the most of it. I volunteered for a political campaign. I attended a rally in support of a couple who had been discriminated against. I joined a group of women attempting to start a roller derby league. I volunteered to lead my NaNoWriMo region. The candidate I campaigned for lost the election, the couple I attended the rally to support left town, the roller derby league folded after just a couple of years, and other constraints on my time forced me to pass on the NaNoWriMo leadership reigns this past year. But I met some amazing people through all of these activities, people who are still important in my life now and who I would never have met if I had not put myself out there.

          I also learned to take a step back from my own prejudices against this place and ask: What could be good about living here? I have since childhood enjoyed running. I was a serious competitive runner in my youth, and running has remained one of my primary forms of physical exercise throughout much of my life. But the town in which I now live is not a good place to run. There are few sidewalks, almost nothing in the way of off-road trails, as soon as one gets outside the limits of the very small town the speed limit is dangerously high for pedestrians, everywhere here is exposed to high winds, and there is no local running group. What to do? At first, I got a treadmill and tried using that. But I hated treadmill running. So I purchased an annual Provincial Parks pass and started running in my local Provincial Park. This is a large park with lots of forested trails that shelter me from the wind and the sun. It is only a 15 minute drive from where I live now and is a much nicer place to run than anywhere I had access to when I lived in a city. Plus: a lot goes down in this park besides just running! Since I had a pass for the park anyhow, I started attending as many events offered by the park as I could get out to. I got into activities I would never even have thought of doing when I lived in a city--birding, nature photography, stand up paddleboarding--and have started to meet people and build community through these activities.

          Whenever people are gathered together, even in small communities, there is most likely already something good going on, and there is certainly the potential to make something good happen. Since you have been living abroad you have no doubt gathered many skills and experiences that you could now share with your home community. So have another look around. See what is already out there. And if there's something you want to see that isn't available in your town now, start it! (Don't be afraid to fail. Failure is okay. If you attempt something and the project ultimately does not take off, you will still gain something valuable for having made the attempt.) You might even want to consider starting a local DAREBEE workshop!

          P.S.: I understand winter too, and I think Sebastian_Greil has a valid point. But winter might be a great time to do the planning work necessary to get something started in the spring. (And knowing that you're going to be a part of--maybe even the leader of--a group effort in the spring might help motivate you to get some workouts done now too, even though it can be tough to workout alone and in the winter.)

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            #6
            Thank you all guys! I got a huge amount of motivation!!! I won't wait for Spring, Summer, Valentine's Day or something. Now I go to do Darebee Challenge!)))

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              #7

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                #8
                That’s the spirit

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                  #9
                  Not sure if perhaps this has come up before but Seasonal Affectation Disorder (SAD, yes it is) is often caused by lack of Vitamin D in wintertime. You get Vitamin D mostly from the sun, which you're not exposed to as much in winter, especially if you're staying inside for warmth (note: has to be direct sun --- windows filter this out and don't count)

                  I get very, very down in winter and my doc finally turned me on to taking extra Vitamin D as soon as it starts getting darker in the evenings. Maybe boost your D intake a bit? Any little bit helps in my opinion.

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                    #10
                    Lots of good suggestions above. To kind of put a little bit of info I got from Jocko Willink's podcast and book Discipline Equals Freedom, try to give yourself some structure for working out. Set a time to work out each day or throughout the week depending when you want to work out. You may need to push yourself to do your routine the first few times but once it becomes a habit at working out at that time you will begin to do it regularly. Jocko quite famously, if you see his instagram feed, works out very early each morning and then gets on with his day.

                    Working out will also help with releasing endorphins, the feel good factor.

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