Ask Me Anything - November

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    #31
    aerochic interesting question with many facets. Let's unpack it a little so it becomes clearer. Exercise is the work the muscles do. The same work, done to the same intensity and for the same duration will burn the same amount of energy (i.e. calories) regardless of whether you do it fasted or not. The key word here is "same". If you change the intensity of an exercise or its duration you also change the amount of calories required to fuel the body's work.

    So, to get back to what you asked, if you do the exact same thing, fasted, where does the body gets its energy from? Well, the body needs to access stored glycogen and fat and since you haven't eaten anything it can use as fuel, it reaches for your body's stored fat deposits. One of the direct benefits of this approach is that it tends to optimize the body's insulin response and lean, in general, to a leaner body mass even if after walking or exercising you do have a hearty breakfast.

    In addition, there is increasing evidence that exercising while in a fasted state helps the body optimize its hormonal profile (i.e. the way the body produces and responds to various hormones that act as neurotransmitters). We have an article on all this here that may be of some help.

    I hope I answered your question fully.

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      #32
      Thanks Damer, I kind of thought that was how it worked but wasn't sure.

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        #33
        Completely different question. Any recommended exercises for bursitis of the knee? It randomly decided to show back up a little over a week ago after first appearance over a decade ago and hasn't been a thing since. I had exercises then but can't remember what they were.

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          #34
          Following up on aerochic 's question about food and exercise, I (re)read the article you mentioned and that raised another question. I guess we've all heard the warning not to go swimming within an hour of having eaten, and I kind of do the same before I go to training - make sure I eat at least an hour before because I don't like eating late and I'd only get home around 9:30pm. Would I be better off eating earlier than that one-hour before in order to maximise benefits? I can't exercise before breakfast but I can before lunch, so how much time should I leave after breakfast for afternoon training, and any food before my evening training?

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            #35
            TopNotch it really depends on what you've eaten, how much and what type of exercise you will engage in. To digest food properly the body uses up energy and diverts blood supply to the stomach and the organs responsible for secreting the substances necessary for digestion. To exercise properly the body also uses energy and diverts blood supply and oxygen to the muscles and the organs necessary for secreting the neurotransmitters the muscles use to work. There, you have two energy-intensive processes. The moment you pit one against the other you are compromising the ability of either to do what it is designed to do.

            In the summer I routinely go swimming after a meal. But I sort of float and splash around in the water as opposed to surf or swim long distances. And, since I am at the beach, a three-course meal is out of the question.

            You have to find your own level here. Experiment to see what works best for you and when. And that shall allow you to tune into your own body better.

            I hope this helps.

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              #36
              GiorgosD manual, agricultural work is hard indeed! It will help your cardio but it also produces hidden strength benefits as you have to do prolonged low-intensity but difficult work which helps in both lower and upper body strength. However as extra resources you should use these workouts:

              https://darebee.com/workouts/steel-dragon-workout.html
              https://darebee.com/workouts/alpha-workout.html
              https://darebee.com/workouts/instant...n-workout.html

              And for Yoga try this one out:

              https://darebee.com/workouts/inner-s...h-workout.html

              I hope this helps.

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                #37
                aerochic bursitis is caused by inflammation and inflammation is part of the adaptive response of the knee joint. You're exercising so I'd say if you're patient, drop the intensity and wait it out it will go away. But I understand it can be annoying. The exercises that help with it all involve strengthening of the muscles that support the function of the knee. If you follow any of the ones here: https://darebee.com/filter#sort=posi...me=knee&page=1 It will be of assistance.

                I hope this helps.

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                  #38
                  I will keep this thread open until this Friday. So, any pressing issues you're facing now's the time to air them.

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                    #39
                    Originally posted by Damer View Post
                    facuzayas such a short question which requires such a long answer to do it justice!

                    The WimHof method uses cryotherapy to reduce inflammation in the body and speed-up healing and recovery in tissue. We have anecdotal accounts on the health benefits of cryotherapy from athletes but no real in-depth studies so its mechanism is not yet understood. But you really ask about one aspect of the WimHof method which is the preparation of the body for immersion in freezing or near-freezing water through breathing exercises.

                    Now this is the part of the WimHof method that science understands much better. The WimHof breathing method, which anyone can learn, consists of taking a number of very deep breaths very fast, followed by a number of shallow breaths which we hold as possible, followed by 'recovery' breathing. WimHof himself explains it on his website. Taking deep, measured breaths oxygenates the blood, reduces the load on the cardiac muscle, lowers blood cortizol levels and induces a sense of euphoria. This is why we have Breathing Techniques For Anxiety at Darebee, this article, in particular, explains the brain-body loop that is activated by controlled, deep breathing. Breathing correctly also helps with workouts and, helps with sustained physical activity of any kind.

                    But taking deep breaths does a lot more than just oxygenate the blood. It also changes its acidity (pH) to alcaline. This inhibits the acidosis of blood that happens due to extreme or prolonged metabolic activity and increases the length of the anaerobic cycle. A 2021 study on this which was pioneered on sprinters can be found here. Although the sprinters didn't show any improvement of their physical abilities after one session of WimHof breathing they reported psychological and emotional benefits.

                    A Smithsonian magazine article from 2018 details WimHof's extraordinary physical feats and attempts to explain how it is possible. Part of that explanation is found in a 2014 study which looked at the links between voluntary control of our breathing and the impact it has on the body's immune response. The basic science is that deep breathing activates a number of neurochemical changes in the body (including the brain) which, in turn, suppress the immune response, reduce tissue inflammation and oxidative stress and allow us to feel good and work with little seeming stress in adverse conditions.

                    I hope this helps you understand this better.
                    WOW!!! Such an answer!!

                    I'll see all of the articles that you mentioned, thanks so much!

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                      #40
                      So many interesting questions and answers so far! Thank you for sharing your knowledge, Damer

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                        #41
                        furrymama Oh yes, I like Beard Meats Food too 🙂

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                          #42
                          A question and a request for you, Damer :
                          1. It is widely accepted that each individual perceives lifting weights differently. What is heavy for one, may be warm up for the other. But, how do metabolic adaptations apply, when you lift light, and that is your "heavy"? Isn't there an objective response of the body? Take me for example: I am M188, 70kg. When I bench press, my limit is 45kg, 5 reps to failure. But, if my body's capability is to press 90 kg 5 reps to failure, won't my body work lighter, even if I can't do any more? And if a guy with 10kg more muscle than me, presses 100kg and can do 12 reps, wouldn't he still burn more, and gain better?
                          2. Taking from one of my favourite workouts here, "Black Panther", I think it would be a great idea to make a "welcome to the jungle" themed week, with 7 animals with different traits... I have some ideas, if you're into that..!

                          Thanks a lot!!!

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                            #43
                            GiorgosD interesting question which needs to be unpacked a little. Let's start with the obvious: all bodies are in flux. This makes lifting "heavy" both a relative and entirely subjective experience. You cannot really work out a body's capacity to lift from its height and weight alone. Those come into play when we deal with relative states of fitness that achieve an acceptable median which, in turn, allows us to take height and weight into account within that sample.

                            So, really, you lift "heavy" going on what is heavy for you at the time. Adaptations occur when you approach your limit. That limit will vary from day to day. Provided however that you approach your limit each and every time (and only you can truly determine this) you will experience physical change in your body.

                            I need to add here that metabolism doesn't work the way you say it does, exactly, though what you said is an intuitive way of thinking about it. Because of the complexities presented by metabolism we're preparing a guide on it so I won't mention much more about it here for now because it will only complicate things and I will need to write a short book about it. If you're a little patient that guide will be out next week.

                            I hope what I added here though helps a little.

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                              #44
                              I am going to close this thread now. As usual I am grateful to all of you for your questions, curiosity and participation here. Hopefully what I've put here also helps you guide those in The Hive who are new to it when they ask questions. Stay safe everyone and a big THANK YOU! from me.

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