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    #16
    No, not jumping but just lifting the leg higher. Like a ballet dancer's extension - or in my case, a martial arts kick (I'm more performance than sparring, so height is encouraged). In side kick position, for example, I can lift (as opposed to kick) my leg pretty high, but when it comes to doing the same in the front, although I can get my knee to my shoulder, extension at that height is impossible at the moment. I know a lot depends on the hamstring and that's slowly improving, but at the point above 90 degrees where I can straighten my leg, it feels as though some muscles just quickly give up because it's too hard and then the quads start to shake and it's all over. I'm wondering how to strengthen those muscles particularly, or are they ones targetted by those mentioned workouts?

    I appreciate that such specific training goals might be outside the scope of this Q&A, but I thought I'd ask.

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      #17
      I am unable to put together a good question, but would like some advice on improving my flexibility as part of a well rounded fitness routine.

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        #18
        I feel like work stress often drives me to unhealthy choices... particularly sugar and caffeine. I have this thing where I fear that I won't be able to perform well enough (on certain days at work) without something like an energy drink or something sugary. How can I think that away?

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          #19
          @Negras.....I am trying to focus more on intuitive eating than refusing cravings. If I want something that much, I'll just give in. But as Damer said, I do my best to have a small portion of it instead of going hog wild. LOL

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            #20
            Georgina Ich [QUOTE...Watching mukbang videos do help many go through their diets, believe it or not- eg Erik the Electric on YouTube...​​[/QUOTE]. I enjoy watching Beard Meats Food on YouTube. He has helped me to stop wanting to eat so much. LOL

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              #21
              Anek intermittent fasting is safe enough to practice every day if possible. It helps regulate the energy available to the body and it triggers a lot of beneficial adaptations. The fact that you lost 3kg in a week suggests your body went through a period of adjustment. Obviously, there is an element of discomfort to it. Even those who practice it everyday for years on end report going to bed sometimes and feeling really, really hungry. How you deal with that comes down to your own motivation. Just so we don't get lost in the fuzziness of the term "motivation" I am linking to my post and explanations on it here. In the Darebee article, in keeping with current practice we noted that intermittent fasting can be applied "from time to time" because we avoid being prescriptive at all costs. The choices each person makes have to be suited to them and to apply a one-size fits all approach is to go set people up to fail and go back to the toxic culture of finger-pointing and blame that the fitness industry has suffered from in the past. So, to get directly back to your question, how you apply it is up to you. Experiment and see how far you get and if you do it would be great if you shared that part of your journey here with us. Your question is probably in the mind of many others in The Hive and they would benefit directly from your experience.

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                #22
                TopNotch I see what you meant and thank you for clarifying it here. I totally misunderstood your question. Pretty much every martial artist asks this at some point plus we look with envy at gymnasts and ballet dancers who seem to be able to control their legs so well. I will break down the mechanics a little here for you so you can see what it is you need to do. Raising the leg, straight up, as you suggest certainly requires some hamstring flexibility but nothing what you imagine and I'd say on that you're already there. The easiest way to test this is to use the Tae Kwon Do exercise where you swing your backleg, knee straight, and try to bring your thigh to your chest and your foot above your head. My guess is you will come pretty close. Muscles are designed to stretch over 50% over their length in ballistic movements (which is what this is) so although more hamstring flexibility makes such move seemingly effortless, fluid and faster it won't help doing what you want to do which is raise your front leg, knee straight as high as you can.

                To understand how to do this better we need to see what the mechanism for doing so is. As you slowly raise your leg, knee straight, to the front, you are activating your front hip flexors (to raise it), glutes of your standing leg (for stability), front abs (for upper body stability) and hamstrings and ankle joint of your standing leg (for balance). Of all this the key one to raising the leg, to the front, as high as possible are the hip flexors. Ballet dancers practice doing this to different heights hundreds of times every day so their front hip flexors are really, really strong. So are their abs and hamstrings and glutes and ankle joint.

                You also noticed how your quads shake after a while when you do it so here the quads get tired because in this movement they are pulling constantly against the hamstring. If you worked just on quad strength and hamstring flexibility for a while you will find that your ability to raise your leg improves because you change the dynamic tension between the two (almost like a bow and string situation). But for best control you need to work your front hip flexors and for that any workout that does it (with flutter kicks or high knees to the waist, for instance) will work perfectly here.

                To have the kind of control that ballet dancers have however you will need to do what they do: prior to every workout they spend up to 30-40 minutes working on hip flexors and controlling how they raise their legs.

                I really hope this helps a little now.

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                  #23
                  leep00 that's a good question in its own right. Flexibility has two functions: It is there to free the body so we can move faster and more explosively without injury in activities such as sprinting, running, kicking and jumping and it is a fitness attribute in its own right in activities such as some martial arts, ballet and gymnastics. In the former any of out stretching workouts from our workout filter will do: https://darebee.com/filter#sort=posi...etching&page=1 In the latter you will need to work on specific attributes such as doing the splits: https://darebee.com/workouts/splits-workout.html and: https://darebee.com/challenges/splits-challenge.html.

                  So, it really depends on your own personal goals. I hope this helps.

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                    #24
                    Nevetharine the answer to your question is easy to articulate and hard to do. Any stressful situation makes us feel uncomfortable. When we feel uncomfortable our body tries to make us feel better so we reach for whatever crutch each of us needs. Usually: food and alcohol. In your particular case, from the description you provided, you are dealing with an additional layer of stress. First the one that triggers your anxiety and then the second one that suggests that without your crutch of coffee and sugar you won't be able to get through this challenge. The brain is complex but you already exhibit sufficient self-awareness to see what triggers you and understand your own performance fear that leads you to reach out for a fix. What is key in dealing with this is that you have to regulate your emotion. One of the way we do this is through breathing. We have a guide on breathing and anxiety. The practice allows you to reduce the amount of stress you feel, mitigate the body's stress response and activate all the higher cognitive analysis centers in the brain which help guide your decisions. But that is not the whole picture. You've linked performance anxiety to coffee and sugar (or energy drinks) for energy. This is not how energy drinks work. In order to be confident in your own ability you have to talk yourself up. Create your own personal pep-talk or mantra. The one thing that picks you up when you feel you're down and helps you focus on your own abilities and self-worth. This takes time too but it helps you feel your own strength and in doing so raises you from the neurochemical state of mind where you are looking for external aids to help you perform better internally. I really hope this helps a little.

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                      #25
                      Thanks Damer As you said, its a simple solution but hard to master. Just like meditation😁

                      In the setting in which I work I'm expected to maintain a high level of speed and accuracy in typing - which requires a steady focus. One that caffeine seems to heighten. See, I did it once, I saw results once, and now my brain expects those results everytime, which is why it asks for the caffeine on a busy day.

                      And I often go to work expecting to have a "normal" day and then out of nowhere (not really, its a retail hardware store so all is planned) I get thrown into a busy day where I have to not only maintain the accuracy of a cashier, but I also have to have the stamina to move 70 5litre cans of bonding liquid, and 70 5kg (10lb) bags of grout. (Like last week).

                      I never get a hint that such a day will arrive. So I plan for a "normal" day with light activity by packing a somewhat light lunch only to find that my lunch will be way too little fuel. That's the other part of the anxiety.

                      If I were just having a busy day as a cashier... I might have only gone for the energy drink.

                      But now I have a physically demanding day on top of that...so now I reach for a candy bar as well.

                      The only option I've come up with is to have my main meal at lunch and a lighter dinner. But that doesn't always work well with my family life at home. See, I'm not a breakfast person. So I skip breakfast, and take a light lunch to work on a day like that where I basically have to do 2 people's jobs.

                      I guess in hindsight, having extra energy on a demanding day isn't a bad thing - if it were from less hazardous sources.

                      I dunno, my head is weird. The same brain that nags for the energy drink has deep compassion for its body's liver and kidneys that have to filter out all that caffeine straight after gulping down said drink.

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                        #26
                        Yes, thanks for that, Damer I know what it is I want to achieve, but often I'm not sure that what I'm actually doing is going to get me there. This gives me something specific to focus on for a bit.

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                          #27
                          Thank you Damer, this is helpful. Let's see how I can incorporate it in my normal day.

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                            #28
                            Hey Damer been waiting this anxiously!!!
                            So, long story short, I am currently working on strength training with 5x5 and feel great! My running time has developed, my martial arts training is more giving and feel a difference in general! Problem is, for proceeding time, I will be helping my father with working manual agricultural work, so my cardio is guaranteed with all the walking up and down, but I don't have access to free weights or a gym there.
                            Can you recommend any workout from the database with similar benefits? I know using the filters I can get some workouts, it's just I need something more specific, as I tend to be very indecisive and end up with nothing!!!
                            Also, what is a good yoga routine for strength training? Nothing fancy, just effective and simple. If you need more details, please ask!!! TIA

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                              #29
                              When you exercise while fasted do you burn fewer calories since the body is trying harder to pull energy out of storage? Or to rephrase does it take the same amount of time/effort to burn the same number of calories fasted as not fasted, just a different source of energy? For instance, do I burn more calories walking my dog in the morning before or after breakfast? Same route daily and same time of day, just food at a later time.

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                                #30
                                Thank you Damer.

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