Ask Me Anything

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    Ask Me Anything


    Over the last few weeks quite a few of you have reached out privately with messages to ask questions regarding Darebee fitness protocols or check something specific regarding exercise. The year for us has been pretty crazy busy and I haven't been able to get back to many of you, despite my best efforts. This is why I am opening up this thread that will remain open for a week only, for you to ask me any questions regarding fitness, Darebee exercises and Darebee programs.

    I will try, each time, to be as in-depth and detailed in my answers as possible.

    #2
    Hi, when will the Total Warrior program be ready?

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      #3
      Will there be a breathing muscle workout? (To possibly address long covid.)

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        #4
        Perfect timing! In the new Hamstring Mobility workout there's a 30 second rest in between sets yet the exercises are low intensity and a low number of reps. Is it important to actually rest that long, and if yes, why? Because I've never seen a stretching workout quite like that on Darebee before. I'd like to add this to my other regular rehab workouts, which I do as a single set with no rest in between workouts, and wonder about the effectiveness of rest when it comes to stretching exercises compared to general/more intensive exercise.

        Anyway, this workout is exactly what I'd been looking for to help strengthen my legs so thank you for making it

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          #5
          I'm confused by tendons training. I know it's important to train them to prevent injury but some of the most common tendon injuries are caused by repetitive mouvements. How do you find the balance between the two ?

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            #6
            Zastria I am wondering about the same thing on Hamstring Mobility and I love that workout. I did it last night and I mostly went about it like: all 10 reps on the left, rest 30 secs, another 10 reps on the left, then switched side to do 10 reps right away, rest 30 secs, and did the last set on the right side again. It's mostly just to save time.

            But I was also wondering if it would give the same effect as 4 sets of 5/5 each time. I was in doubt so for the 2nd last one I did 2 sets of 10-count each side (EC). Otherwise I would do 20 count each side with no rest in between.

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              #7
              Some awesome question in this thread already. I will answer them in the order they came in. So, first one: DragonFit the "Total Warrior" program is almost there. A few weeks at most which places it around the end of this month. We are a little behind schedule and I am to blame for this. My aim here is to produce a sequel to "Fighter's Codex" that addresses the "Total" aspect of the title by helping train the body completely not just through combat moves but combat muscle-specific exercises. Making it accessible while doing that has resented some challenges we are ironing out so please bear with me.

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                #8
                Noen breathing is tremendously important and, as you say, the pandemic has shown just how bad we are at it. We have one in the pipeline that is being processed so the answer is "Yes" and relatively soon.

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                  #9
                  Zastria and kandy the benefits of stretching on increased mobility and prevention of injury have been anecdotally known for a long time. In the last fifteen years or so sports science has taken a more detailed, methodical look at the claims and the data has revealed a number of interesting developments that we, in Darebee, were quick to take on board and adapt to our workouts. First of all, the most immediate benefit of stretching is in greater Rand Of Movement (ROM) in joints like the knee or the hip. Some of it is because of lengthening of specific muscle fibers in specific muscle groups, like the hamstrings, but that is not the whole story.

                  We now know that stretching, in any form, is a mechanical load experienced by muscle fibers. This leads the muscle fibers to experience mechanical transformations because of the load and activate the adaptation response. This, in turn, leads to a period of strength-loss for the muscle as it adapts. This is one reason why stretching before a power or strength workout is frowned upon because it can lead to injury. De-strengthened muscles that are then loaded in the workout itself can suffer damage to both the muscle fibers and the ligaments.

                  One study which looks at some of this can be found here. Another study that looks at evidence of stretching as part of muscle growth is found here. One of the studies that looked, in detail, at the mechanism through which muscle growth and strength-enhancement can take place through stretching is here. In addition, a study that looks specifically at the benefits (and some drawbacks) of static stretching can be found here.

                  Range Of Motion (ROM) improvements are not, however, just the result of reduced 'stiffness' of the muscle because of elongated muscle fibers. A lot of other factors come into consideration here including neuroplasticity (the ability of new neural networks to be built up to guide that response) and adaptations to calcium ion channels that govern the way muscles contract and relax.

                  We took all of this in consideration when crafting the "Hamstring Mobility" workout which is why it has the format it has and why it requires the breaks it requires despite it being "low intensity". The degree of intensity you experience as a person is low (there is no significant raise of body temperature, no hard breathing and no appreciable metabolic load). At the same time what your hamstrings experience can be quite different.

                  Having said that, as with every Darebee workout and program, we want to avoid being over-prescriptive. We are not there with you measuring every physical movement and every person has a different physiology and a unique neurone. This is why it is important to work out what works best for you by tracking what you do. I hope you both think of using the "Fitness Log" we prepared over the course of a year. It allows you to keep a record of what you did, when and how you did it so you can best see what works for you, especially when you introduce variations that deviate from a workout or program and you then really need to gauge their effectiveness.

                  I hope this has answered your question.

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                    #10
                    miawtthias this is an excellent question to post here and a brilliant follow-up to the one asked by Zastria and kandy on the "Hamstring Mobility" workout. It is important to understand first what tendons do, why they get injured and why we should train them, specifically. Tendons are the thick 'ropes' of fiber that anchor muscles to bones. They are, basically, the anchor points that enable the muscle to work and they take a tremendous amount of often variable load every time a joint is put through its motions and a muscle group contracts.

                    They get injured when they experience a large load suddenly without adequate preparation. Tendons have relatively few blood vessels and parts of the tendon have no nerves, though there are nerve endings at the point where the tendon joins the bone. Doing heavy strength workouts without an adequate warm up or doing explosive bodyweight training without warming up can lead to small injuries in the tendon. Because these injuries are not obvious (the lack of nerves in the bulk of a tendon make it difficult to ascertain the damage it suffers), repetitive movements can then damage them further. In some cases, repetitive movements alone are enough to damage the tendon. In those cases it is because the tendon is insufficiently strong to hold the muscle.

                    A person who engages in repetitive movements (lifting punching, kicking) will experience muscle adaptations that will increase the strength of the muscle group and, often, the size of the muscle group. The tendon however is not strengthened specifically and because it lacks the complex network of neurons that a muscle group possesses, it fails to adapt. As a result we end up with an inconsistency in strength. Really powerful muscles may end up being anchored by tendons that have not changed to cope with the greater power that the muscles can provide.

                    Tendon strength training is designed to address all that. By targeting tendons specifically through the movement of limbs and/or joints it allows the tendons to experience a disproportionate mechanical load and begin to adapt so they can grow stronger. Gymnasts, martial artists and ballet dancers are three groups of athletic performers who incorporate tendon strength in their exercise routines and experience amazing body control and explosive power without having overly large muscles.

                    I hope this has answered your question.

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                      #11
                      Damer Thanks for your response. Just a quick question regarding the Hamstring Mobility workout: should you take any rest between exercises? I did 30 secs rest yesterday.

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                        #12
                        kandy we suggest, in the workout, a 30 second rest between each exercise. So you do, let's say 10 leg raises, wait 30 seconds, repeat until you have done the four sets. Then go on to the next one. I hope this helps.

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                          #13
                          Damer I mean the rest time betwen the moves, say, leg raises and leg swings. Do I do leg swings right after the 4th set of leg raises? Or it's still 30 secs rest after the very last set of leg raises?

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                            #14
                            Originally posted by Damer View Post
                            Noen breathing is tremendously important and, as you say, the pandemic has shown just how bad we are at it. We have one in the pipeline that is being processed so the answer is "Yes" and relatively soon.
                            Aww jackpot!

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                              #15
                              Originally posted by kandy View Post
                              Damer I mean the rest time between the moves, say, leg raises and leg swings. Do I do leg swings right after the 4th set of leg raises? Or it's still 30 secs rest after the very last set of leg raises?
                              Ah, I see - Yeah, you don't have to wait 30 seconds to go to the next set of exercises as different muscles are exercised by each set, even when there are overlapping muscle groups recruited in the exercise.

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