What Exercise Does To Us

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    What Exercise Does To Us



    It would appear that exercise is medicine for the body and mind. It helps reverse ageing, fights fatigue and helps us take control of our own body. We just put up a long article with many studies and links. Check it out and let me have any questions. The article is here.

    #2
    Damer It is a great article. Lots of information. It’s one of those articles I will read several times & learn more each time.

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      #3
      PETERMORRIS966 I am really glad it is helping. The latest studies show that physical activity has deep effects in the body, including the way it affects the immune system. We are working on another piece on that separately as this one, already got pretty long. It's an exciting time to be alive in with all the new things we are learning.

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        #4
        What is worth taking away from the approach however is that our body is always in a process of ‘becoming’ instead of just ‘being’. It takes effort and energy to get us there and effort and energy to maintain the gains we have made.
        Wonderful article! Thank you so much for putting the time and effort into it

        I have noticed that HIIT has been mentioned several times, it is the start of the article

        A couple of questions:

        - Aerobic Stress / Metabolic Stress
        Both are directly affected by HIIT exercises. Why is HITT preferred over jogging/running?

        - Mechanical Load
        Muscular damage increases Creatine Kinase (CK) in blood, is there a normal level? Does CK level go down by time even if we keep exercising?
        When To-Failure and when to not?

        Thank you, once again

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          #5
          Musical gym what excellent questions you raise

          OK, starting with the easiest one first: HIIT is preferred because the built-in rest internals allow the body to recover which means that the intensity throughout the exercise period is pretty high. High intensity means high stressor coefficient which raises both the metabolic and aerobic stress levels. Jogging and running do work but the intensity is lower and uneven throughout the exercise time period therefore they do not deliver results as quickly. HIIT is basically a shortcut to higher fitness levels.

          Creatine Kinase is used (medically) to diagnose muscle damage to the heart. During intense training it is used to gauge the level of mechanical load and muscle damage sustained by a subject. There is a range of CK based on sex and age (there is a table here) but for trained subjects the level will be individual and when you exercise the fitter you are the lower CK you will exhibit.

          Generally speaking, exercising to failure subjects the muscles to a high mechanical load which means they sustain mechanical damage. This will, in turn, impact their performance in the short term and require recovery (even if it is active recovery). There is a study on this here. We don't have valid scientific data on sustained to-failure training on, let's say. consecutive days but anecdotally athletes train to failure in order to trigger the adaptations they need to enhance their performance. The next day their 'recovery' may entail the same work they did the day before but at about half-load (hence active recovery). So, to answer your question more fully, you train to failure each time you want to level up or test to see where you are at in comparison to the last time you did it but you aim to work in recovery time between such training sessions so the muscles can indeed recover and get stronger.

          I hope all this has helped.

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            #6
            Damer thank you for fulfilling my questions!

            I will start doing HIIT and run twice a week.

            As for To-failure, I usually do it in the last set of pull-ups / push-ups. I’ll try to do the same for other exercises.

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              #7
              Damer I have a question. One thing that I have learned from the internet is that instead of doing 100 push-ups in one go, you can split into 10 sets of 10, and you will still have the same amount of training, which to me implies that they have the same result. I think that's the logic of the Totals program, too.

              But one doesn't need to be an expert to know that doing 100 in one go is way harder than 10x10, which is also an example mentioned in the article, so how can they be the same? If I want to train my endurance then obviously I should aim for 100 in one go?

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                #8
                kandy the easiest way I can explain this is to say that Marathon runners preparing for a marathon don't actually run one before the race. Though, they can put the same number of kilometers in one day split over two-three shorter runs. Undoubtedly there are forces applied to the muscles when you do 100 push ups in one go that are not exactly the same because of a combination of mechanical and metabolic load and maybe even an aerobic one, though that would be rare in this instance. But for the adaptive response to kick in and muscles to get stronger you don't necessarily need the 100 push-ups all in one go unless that is your specific goal. I hope this helps explain it better.

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                  #9
                  Damer okay thanks!

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