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  • TopNotch
    replied
    True, Fremen but sometimes to get good at that one thing, you have to progress slowly, swapping one activity for a harder one as you build up. Like a baby. First a baby crawls, then it walks and then it runs (well, if you're lucky it walks and doesn't just go straight into the running part!). You can't just tell a baby to start running until it can run because it has to build up to that. Like to be able to do a push-up, you might have to start with wall push-ups, then incline push-ups, then perhaps knee push-ups, before you can get to full push-ups. What I mean is, in order for me to, for example, kick higher, I need to work the hip flexors so perhaps I'll start with march steps, nice and high. Then I'll add an explosive element and make them high knees (plus other hip flexor strengthening exercises). But that's not going to be enough. I'll also have to add some stretching and tendon work, but all that's okay if I know where I am heading. I can tell if what I'm doing is helping me get where I want to be, and if not, I can stop or change it. I just have to be alert to that, and that's where the experimentation you mention will come in, too. Personally, I think it's all very exciting - identifying where you want to be and the best way to get there. And I also need to allow for the occasional bit of just plain fun - the things that don't take much time but which add that bit of lightness and relief - and avoids stagnation. Thank you for reminding me of that.

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  • Fremen
    replied
    On a regular basis, I also mull over my training
    I think it is important both to keep in mind what the final goal is (as HellYeah always says) and to maintain a certain openness to experimentation in order not to stagnate.
    In the end the only thing that is always true is that if you want to get good at one thing you have to do it as much as possible, that specific thing

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  • TopNotch
    replied
    Day 712

    ​​​​ Programme:
    - Day 23 Fit December
    ​ Medito - Day 9 of Mindfulness.

    Nearly fell off the wagon again - the train-for-what-you-need-to-train wagon, that is! I was thinking about pistol squats, and wondered how I could best train for them because I reckon it would be cool to be able to do a good one (mine wobbles and, quite frankly, doesn't get very low!), but then I wondered why I should train to do a pistol squat. Don't get me wrong, I reckon any bodyweight training is great, and I'd love to be able to do a good pistol squat, but do I need to? My concern is that doing exercises just because they are or look like fun, even if they ultimately improve my strength or other fitness, takes time away from the training I ought to be doing in order to improve what I want to be doing. There are only 24 hours in every day. Most of them are taken up with the tasks we all have to a similar degree - family, food, sleep, shopping, etc - so the actual time I have to train isn't really that much so I have to be as economical as possible and as focussed as possible.

    I was asked recently if I exercised (sorry, you have to ask?! I guess this t-shirt is a bit baggy...). I do exercise - a bit. Doing FD is exercising; it's not training. It's keeping a certain level of fitness going, and I do it to get as much out of each session (though they're fairly brief) as possible. That's exercising. I do more training, though, which is working towards a particular goal, and choosing those particular activities and exercises that will move me towards that goal. So when, for example, I was working on the splits, it wasn't just so I could do the splits but rather so I could better my extensions, increase the height of my kicks. I've worked on increasing my push-ups reps. This will improve my upperbody strength, but really, that's about all (oh, I know, core and back and etc, but it's mostly about strength). It won't help me punch faster because to do that, I have to practice punching faster. The strength will help, of course, but there are other activities I can do that will give me upperbody strength too. I know I'm rambling again but really, I'm just talking to myself here, trying to get my thoughts in order. So what it all boils down to is: what gives me the biggest bang for my bucks - or rather, what uses my time most effectively? I think my focus for this next month (when there's no formal training) is tendon strength (tendons take about 3 times as long to gain strength as do muscles, but fortunately they keep it longer), adductors (to stabilise the knees and lift legs), abductors, hip flexors, as well as some running/cycling for cardio because I don't want to lose what I've recently gained. This doesn't mean I'll be neglecting the rest of me - there'll be other stuff thrown in from time to time, and of course my specific taekwondo training will also work the whole body.

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  • TopNotch
    replied
    Day 711

    ​​​​ Programme:
    - Day 22 Fit December
    ​ Medito - Day 8 of Mindfulness.
    100 March Steps (while waiting for the potatoes to finish boiling). After watching this about the benefits of high knees, etc, and how easy it is to incorporate things like march steps into daily activity (in front of the teev, while cooking dinner, and so forth), I thought it an excellent idea to do a few. 100 really gets those flexors tired!

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  • TopNotch
    replied
    Day 710

    ​​​​ Programme:
    - Day 21 Fit December
    ​ Medito - Day 7 of Mindfulness.
    Glute Bridge and Hamstring Curls. With sliders (because they're fun). This deceptively simple exercise really works those hamstrings! After about 20, I did the easier version of single-leg curls where one stays on the floor and the other moves out, just to see what they were like. A bit too easy for me, but I think after doing the double-leg ones for a bit, I might try doing the single-leg type where one leg is off the ground while the other moves out. That would be more of a challenge. But as I really felt this today, I think I might just train with double-legs for a while.

    As I'm taking it easy for a bit, I thought I'd do stuff that didn't get me too revved up - like working on the tendons. This was prompted (a bit) by watching some YouTube videos such as this one - and, of course, by the lists I have scattered over my desk headed "tendons" and "hamstring slider exercises" and stuff like that! I find that sidelining myself for a while can be a Good Thing. Not just because I actually have to, but because when I do so, I get the opportunity to do more research into things, to read up on stuff, to find exercises or workouts that I haven't tried/heard of before. I actually find it very motivating. Sometimes a bit overwhelming, to be honest, too, but interesting. And I can start planning for the New Year.

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