Rainbow Dragon's Dares

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Rainbow Dragon I'm happy to read you are doing YTT. Imho, with how much of what you do on a daily basis is just taking care of others (parents, dogs, protecting nature in your area) you owe yourself something that is both nice AND growth oriented.

    Who knows, a bunch of fashion types enthralled with how much yoga was shown on the last "making the cut" could set up a commune near you >.> Or, more realistically, that credential on your resume, earned whilst doing home care, could help you get a job doing activities programming for a nursing home or something similar.

    And even if it's never "useful" it is STILL useful just bc it is some activity that escapes the bounds of your current situation, imho. We all need to do things to not feel stuck.

    Comment


      Well said, @‘rin!

      Comment


        Belated Congrats to you and Norma on 500 days of working out together!

        Have fun with YTT!

        Comment


          Thank you:
          'rin
          DorothyMH
          Whirly

          'rin that is pretty much how I look at the YTT. It has value as a vehicle towards personal growth, and it can be a valuable addition to a larger skill set/knowledge base. But as a professional training to fulfill the specific job of "yoga teacher" it's expensive and (in most cases) unnecessary, and it would take a long time to pay for itself if that was the only value one saw in it.

          Comment


            More photos from Wednesday's hike:

            This dragonfly was a lifer for me. I recognized it immediately as an Ebony Jewelwing (Calopteryx maculata) as I'd seen photographs of this species before, and there isn't anything else like it in my area. I was excited to spot this ode in a wide open area with good views, because I think they are gorgeous.

            Click image for larger version

Name:	jewelwing.jpg
Views:	82
Size:	373.3 KB
ID:	807838


            Another lifer from Wednesday's hike was this Eastern Milksnake. I won't post the photos here, because they aren't very good, but they were "good enough for an ID shot" as we say. (Click the link to see my observation record on iNaturalist, if you're interested.) In any case, I knew I had a new-to-me species when I first saw the snake, as the colour pattern is unlike any of the other snakes we have in Ontario. Alas, I was hiking behind my friend when we encountered the snake, so it was already reacting to her appearance and slithering off the trail before I glimpsed it. And I had put my camera back in my camera bag at the time to have both hands free to drink from my water bottle. By the time I had secured my bottle and had my camera back in hand, the snake--which had been basking on the middle of the trail--had made it into the cover of the grasses and fallen leaves at the side of the trail, and I could not convince my camera to focus on it. Still, it was a treat to see!


            My next post will contain an image of a spider. A big hairy spider carrying an egg sac. It was pretty cool to see! But if you're squeamish about spiders, be forewarned. This one is a beauty.

            Comment


              This is a Northern Crescent butterfly (Phyciodes cocyta). (The spider image is right after it.)

              Click image for larger version

Name:	crescent.jpg
Views:	86
Size:	400.1 KB
ID:	807841

              Possibly a Fishing Spider, but I'm not sure:

              Click image for larger version

Name:	spider.jpg
Views:	78
Size:	280.3 KB
ID:	807842

              Comment


                Some more butterflies:

                Monarch (Danaus plexippus) on butterfly milkweed:

                Click image for larger version

Name:	monarch.jpg
Views:	83
Size:	355.9 KB
ID:	807846


                Common Ringlet (Coenonympha california):

                Click image for larger version

Name:	ringlet.jpg
Views:	89
Size:	472.4 KB
ID:	807847


                Northern Pearly-Eye (Lethe anthedon):

                Click image for larger version

Name:	pearly.jpg
Views:	80
Size:	412.3 KB
ID:	807848


                Common Wood Nymph (Cercyonis pegala):

                Click image for larger version

Name:	nymph.jpg
Views:	80
Size:	459.0 KB
ID:	807849


                Red-spotted Purple (Limenitis arthemis ssp. astyanax):

                Click image for larger version

Name:	purple.jpg
Views:	85
Size:	400.8 KB
ID:	807850

                Comment


                  Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio glaucus):

                  Click image for larger version

Name:	tiger1.jpg
Views:	83
Size:	414.8 KB
ID:	807853

                  Click image for larger version

Name:	tiger2.jpg
Views:	83
Size:	513.8 KB
ID:	807855


                  Spicebush Swallowtail (Papilio troilus):

                  Click image for larger version

Name:	spicebush.jpg
Views:	78
Size:	360.2 KB
ID:	807856
                  Attached Files

                  Comment


                    A couple of woodpeckers--but not a pair. The bird on the left is a female Hairy Woodpecker (Dryobates villosus). The bird on the right is a juvenile Downy Woodpecker (Dryobates pubescens).

                    Click image for larger version

Name:	dryobates.jpg
Views:	81
Size:	251.8 KB
ID:	807861

                    Note the large, robust bill on the Hairy and the daintier bill on the Downy. Also note the red patch on top of the Downy's head. A red patch at the back of the head on either a Downy or a Hairy Woodpecker indicates an adult male bird. But red on top of the head indicates a juvenile bird. This video of an adult male Downy feeding its offspring shows a good comparison of the two colour patch locations.

                    Comment


                      Beautiful photos RD

                      Comment


                        Cool pictures. Thanks for sharing!

                        Comment


                          Love the pictures, I always like seeing the differences in your wildlife to mine. How big was the spider? It looks like one I'd prefer to keep at a distance!

                          Comment


                            Thank you for the pictures!

                            Comment


                              Thank you:
                              Trbrat75
                              CODawn
                              Zastria

                              It was a good-sized spider, Zastria -- I think the biggest I have ever seen in person. I would estimate its legs are ~ 3" long. I'm not sure on the ID, but think it might be a Dark Fishing Spider -- which can bite humans but usually does not. (In any case its venom isn't dangerous to a human--unless I suppose one was specifically allergic to it.) When the spider decided it had had enough of me and my camera, it disappeared down the hollow in the centre of the tree stump it's standing at the edge of in the photo I posted.

                              Comment


                                Glad you like, Mianevem

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X