Rainbow Dragon's Dares

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    I have Orioles in my area but they are hard to photograph most of the time, hidden away in the tops of trees. I will be buying me some oranges today to attract them!!!

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      Loving the rainbow theme!

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        May 27 Daily Dose of Nature

        The colour yellow features prominently in the summer plumage of many of our wood warblers, but I think the prize for the brightest yellow feathers has to go to one of our more common and well known birds, the male American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis) in breeding plumage.

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        Female goldfinches are yellow too, but as is so often the case with the ladies, their colours are more muted than those of their male counterparts. Also, female American Goldfinches lack the black caps the males acquire in breeding plumage.

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        In non-breeding plumage, both male and female goldfinches are more subdued in colour. The males lose their black caps, but retain some bright yellow colour on their throats.

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        In non-breeding plumage, female American Goldfinches are duller still, more olive-coloured above and below, perhaps with a yellow wash, but no bright yellow as in the males.

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        (It's possible this last picture is of a juvenile male bird. Females in non-breeding plumage look similar to juveniles. There are some subtle differences. But I cannot say for certain what this bird is.)

        American Goldfinches are found throughout temperate North America at some point in the year, including all of the contiguous United States and coast-to-coast across southern Canada. They breed later in the year than most North American birds, waiting until June or even July to nest, when milkweeds and thistles have produced the seeds which this species favours both as food and as nest-building material.

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          Beautiful photos of beautiful yellow birds! I love the pattern on the wing in that last photo.

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            Here's another example of bird names that don't match in other languages. 'goldfinch' litterally translated into Dutch, is actually the word for the Eurasian bullfinch (picture from wikipedia)

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            While the Dutch word for Goldfinch is 'goudsijs' = 'gold siskin'

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              This is so great, Laura/Dragon, thank you!

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                Huh! That is a funny name for that bird, NancyTree . It doesn't have any gold on it at all!

                Your word "goudsijs" makes sense though. New World goldfinches are more closely related to siskins (both genus: Spinus) than they are to Old World goldfinches (genus: Carduelis) or to other New World finches (genus: Haemorhous). Our rosefinches used to be considered members of the same genus as Eurasian rosefinches (genus: Carpodacus) but they got split off into their own genus. Similarly, our goldfinches and siskins used to be members of the Carduelis genus before they were moved to the genus Spinus.

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                  Good luck Trbrat75 ! I have found that, when orioles are in the area, a nice big orange is pretty reliable for drawing them down out of the tree tops. I hope you'll get some great views from your own offering.

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                    Originally posted by Rainbow Dragon View Post
                    Huh! That is a funny name for that bird, NancyTree . It doesn't have any gold on it at all!
                    Weird, right?

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                      Rainbow Dragon Hi! I think I haven't congratulated on you on finishing Baseline yet...Congratulations!!

                      Applause for your mom...and also for you dad, for joining you in the last day of Baseline, that's lovely!! ❤️ Horray for Baseline family! 🙌🏼

                      That's great that your mother agreed to add some challenges to your daily program, congratulations on you both... on you for supporting and encouraging her and on her for not quitting and for doing always a little more!

                      I love all the birds that you've posted...but I have to say that the Cooper's and the Sharp-pinned Hawks were astonishing! And the colours of the Tree Swallows are amazing, seem magic!

                      The photo of the Barn Swallow baby, hungry and shouting, was hilarious!


                      If I'm not wrong, you are almost at the end of Xpress Tone, I hope that you will have fun completing its last days!

                      Have a nice day! ☀️

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                        lapedrina Thank you!

                        You are correct, I have only one day of Xpress Tone left to go. Unfortunately, that program is on pause at the moment since the final day contains lunges, and I injured my right hamstring doing the lunges on Day 26 of the program. It's not a major injury. I'm still able to do squats and to run. But I tested it out on lunges a couple of days ago, and it still said no to them. So I'll give it a couple more days before trying again.

                        I'm glad you're enjoying the birds.

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                          Healing vibes for your hamstring

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                            I'm so sorry for your hamstring! I hope that it will heal very very soon. I wish you a very fast recovery 💕

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                              Thank you Amirsh lapedrina .

                              It is a minor injury, thankfully. I have been running four days in a row now, and while I can feel the hamstring is not 100% while I'm running, it's not actually painful and feels no worse at the end of my run than at the beginning. Today it did not bother me at all doing regular squats. All good signs. I'm just erring on the side of caution re: the final day of Xpress Tone because it includes lunges to fatigue, and I want to ensure this injury stays a minor one.

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                                May 28 Daily Dose of Nature

                                The colour of the day is green. We have a lot of olive-green coloured birds in my part of the world, but not too many that display bright, vibrant green. We do have a couple of waterfowl with green heads and some with other green accents in the males, but our only bird with a vibrant green body is the Ruby-throated Hummingbird (Archilochus colubris).

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                                Both male and female Ruby-throated Hummingbirds have metallic green caps and backs. Both sexes have primarily white undersides, from the chest down, with varying amounts of green or grey mottling on the sides. The adult males typically have a full metallic red gorget--the ruby throat from which this species takes its common name--but that brilliant red is not always visible. The male's throat feathers sometimes turn orange by late summer. Additionally, the male's throat might appear entirely black at any time of the year, depending on the lighting in which one views the bird.

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                                Female Ruby-throated Hummingbirds lack the male's ruby throat.

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                                But some older females do display a few red feathers right in the centre of their throat:

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                                If you see a Ruby-throated Hummingbird only from behind, you might still be able to sex it if you can see the bird's outer tail feathers. Adult females have white tips on their outer three tail feathers whereas the males' tails are entirely black.

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                                Hummingbirds have tiny little feet which are unsuitable for walking or hopping. (In traditional taxonomy, hummingbirds were placed in the order Apodiformes, which means "footless".) A Ruby-throated hummingbird can shuffle along a perch, but otherwise can only move about via flying. Fortunately, these birds have amazing wings!

                                You may have noticed that in all of my photographs of hummingbirds in flight, the bird's wings appear as a blur. A Ruby-throated Hummingbird beats its wings over 50 times per second! You need an incredibly fast shutter speed to capture a clear image of that, and fast shutter speeds make lighting tricky. I'm not sure if my little rig has the chops to do it, but I keep trying. (There is definitely still room for improvement in my own photography skills before I chalk my blurry hummingbird wings up to the limitations of my hardware.)

                                Ruby-throated Hummingbirds are tiny little creatures. Adult females weigh on average just 3.5 grams. The males weigh only 3.0 grams. Yet these birds are long-distance migrants. Ruby-throated Hummingbirds breed in eastern North America and winter in Central America. Most birds make the spring and fall migration journeys by flying non-stop across the Gulf of Mexico--a distance of over 800 km!

                                Ruby-throated Hummingbirds are not great songsters, but here their amazing wings come to the rescue once again. The "hummingbird" name comes not from any vocalization but from the sound created by a hummingbird beating its wings. Male birds develop short, narrow, pointed primary feathers which enable them to produce higher, more variably-pitched sounds than the female's longer, wider, and more rounded primaries which produce a softer, quieter hum than the males.

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