Rainbow Dragon's Dares

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    Yikes! That sounds scary and dangerous!

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      No worries, TopNotch . I'm not going to break myself. Remember: my rules say I'm allowed to sit on the floor as much as I like. I'm just not sitting in chairs. I'm also not "just standing". When I'm on my feet I'm generally moving around, even if it's just shifting my weight from side-to-side, front-to-back, etc. Day 1 of my week-long trial is almost over. All good so far.

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        And be aware of varices (varicose veins) in your legs, that can happen because of standing a lot. Maybe use compression socks to prevent that?

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          Wedge-tails are mainly cranky in Spring. We don't know of anyone that's been forced to do an emergency landing because of a Wedgie but my partner does know of a guy that lost a chunk the size of an A4 sheet of paper out of his sail to one. Replacing a sail is not cheap (~US$3300 for a new sail)!
          Also, it's pretty intimidating having one screaming at you from your wingtip. My partner saw one swoop up a decent sized wallaby too.

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            I read somewhere (I don't remember where) that people used to squat before someone came up with chairs. Maybe give that a try. Good luck with the standing up desk, that sounds pretty comfortable to do every now and then.

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              I am unfortunately now going through the same thing with the Charge 3 I bought for my daughter...Reading the comments and reviews, it seems to me that Fitbit's issues with quality are systemic, as is its poor customer service...

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                I'm sorry you're experiencing problems with your daughter's Fitbit too, Kingstonmike . I've just had the one experience with that company. I won't be doing business with them again.

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                  I'm usually barefoot when I'm at home NancyTree . So no compression socks for me. I'm not worried about varicose veins, in any case. The point to giving up chairs isn't so that I can spend my time standing still instead.

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                    Originally posted by Amirsh View Post
                    I read somewhere (I don't remember where) that people used to squat before someone came up with chairs.
                    And continue to do so, long after the invention of chairs too. Our species managed just fine without chairs for hundreds of thousands of years. Even after chairs were invented, not everyone had one. They've really only been in common use for the general public for a few hundred years.

                    Squatting is great! I do it a lot when out photographing things in nature. At home I'm less likely to squat (outside of a workout). I should probably do it more.

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                      Originally posted by Io6 View Post
                      Also, it's pretty intimidating having one screaming at you from your wingtip
                      I can imagine! It totally never occurred to me that attacks from giant, angry birds was something hang gliders had to deal with.

                      Originally posted by Io6 View Post
                      My partner saw one swoop up a decent sized wallaby too.
                      We have some raptors that attack prey larger than themselves too. I think your Wedgie is larger than any raptors we have in Ontario though.

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                        May 25 Daily Dose of Nature

                        I thought that for this week I would follow a rainbow theme in my DDoN posts, highlighting some of the most brightly hued birds across the spectrum we enjoy in my part of the world.

                        Today's colour is red (my personal favourite). And today's bird is our most brilliantly red Scarlet Tanager (Piranga olivacea).

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                        Scarlet Tanagers winter in South America, but they breed in deciduous forests in eastern North America. Birders in my area are always happy to see the brilliant red colours of male Scarlet Tanagers return to southern Ontario each spring.

                        My rainbow theme for this week is only going to work for the male birds in some cases, including this one, for female Scarlet Tanagers are coloured completely differently from the males.

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                        I think they are beautiful in their own way, but female Scarlet Tanagers are in no way shape or form scarlet. Neither are the males in the fall, for that matter. Male birds in non-breeding plumage are similar in colour to the females, except their wings remain darker.

                        Scarlet Tanagers are generally considered to be birds of the forest interior. They prefer large tracts of mature deciduous forest. But sometimes a bird has to make do with what's available. Both the female bird pictured above, and the male in the top photo, I photographed in my own backyard last summer.

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                          What a beautiful bird! The red is brilliant indeed 😊 Great catch between the green leaves

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                            Thank you NancyTree . The male's brilliant red does make him somewhat easier to see, but it's getting challenging to find the canopy birds now, with all the leaves coming in, for sure.

                            Yesterday I had a whole flock of Cedar Waxwings in my apple tree and did not know it until I was standing right underneath them. I usually begin my backyard bird counts inside the house. We have a big picture window beside our bird feeders, and often I can see birds from inside which will be spooked and take off as soon as I open the door to step outside myself. The apple tree is in plain view of our windows, so I look up there while still inside too. Yesterday I could see nothing in the tree. Lots of blossoms and leaves, but not a bird in sight. Then I went outside. I was walking around, checking out all the usual hotspots, and had passed underneath that tree a few times before I noticed movement up in the canopy. Looked up, and there was a cedar waxwing--no, two cedar waxwings--no, three--four... I counted at least six birds up in that tree, and even then could not be sure I had seen them all!

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                              May 26 Daily Dose of Nature

                              For today's DDoN we have a bright orange bird: the Baltimore Oriole (Icterus galbula).

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                              The bird pictured above is a male. Adult female Baltimore Orioles still show some orange, but their colours are generally more subdued than the male's.

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                              Female Baltimore Oriole plumage is quite variable, with some birds showing little to no dark colouration on the head and others appearing more like the males, but slightly subdued. Female birds tend to get closer to the males in appearance as they age.

                              The smaller bird in this photograph threw me for a loop when I first saw it:

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                              The larger bird in the bottom right is obviously a male Baltimore Oriole. But the bird in the top left, with its stubby little tail, appeared much smaller in the field than the oriole. The two birds were obviously hanging out together though--and for good reason. Both of these birds are Baltimore Orioles. The yellow bird is a juvenile--young enough that its tail feathers have not yet grown in--hanging out with Dad during one of its early flights.

                              Here's a better pic of a juvenile, this one with its tail feathers fully formed:

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                              Baltimore Orioles breed throughout the eastern United States and southeastern and central Canada. Baltimore (and other New World) Orioles were named after Old World Orioles, but these groups of birds are not closely related.

                              If you live within the Baltimore Oriole's range and want to attract these birds to your yard, but out some oranges, cut in half. Baltimore Orioles eat insects, but they also eat fruit and drink nectar--especially in the spring and fall. A nice juicy orange, cut open and ready for feasting is irresistible to a Baltimore Oriole.

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                                I'm loving the rainbow-themed DDoN and I'm looking forward to the next installment (yellow is my favorite color)!

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