Rainbow Dragon's Dares

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    Wow... a few weeks ago I dreamed about a plane crashing into our street and I woke up smiling at how unrealistic that was... it can happen, it seems.

    About the guilt you feel for the migrant farmers... it's so tricky. Because obviously you aren't responsible for their unfortunate circumstances. So, in theory, it's not your problem. But that mentality is what makes us inhumane. So you care. But that doesn't make it any better for them. Because what can one person do? It's a depressing cycle... tell us if you find a comforting thought somewhere in it!

    On a positive note, I was really happy to read your post about turkey vultures. I barely know anything about birds, but I had to look them up specifically because they appeared in a text I had to translate for class. Reading about them again was exciting, because for once I already had a bit of background knowledge.

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      Hope you and your family stay safe and healthy!

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        How beautiful things touch us even bad things do and there is always something to learn, at least I like to think like this, a hug

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          It can be tough, as emotive and intelligent people, we try to rationalize tragedy ... but there are usually no good answers. I think it is ok to lose sleep over such stuff from time to time.

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            Originally posted by Mianevem View Post
            Wow... a few weeks ago I dreamed about a plane crashing into our street and I woke up smiling at how unrealistic that was... it can happen, it seems.
            It was reportedly quite traumatic for the people in whose neighbourhood it happened. (Not to mention for the elderly couple whose house the plane came down on!)

            Originally posted by Mianevem View Post
            About the guilt you feel for the migrant farmers... it's so tricky. Because obviously you aren't responsible for their unfortunate circumstances. So, in theory, it's not your problem. But that mentality is what makes us inhumane. So you care. But that doesn't make it any better for them. Because what can one person do? It's a depressing cycle... tell us if you find a comforting thought somewhere in it!
            Most of the time I try to focus my thoughts and energies on things I can do and not so much on situations which I have no power to control (or even influence in any meaningful way). But I think it's important to think and talk about problems which are beyond my personal scope from time to time. I am a member of the society which benefits from the practice of grossly underpaying farm workers, and I'm complicit in allowing the problem to continue (even though I don't have a choice in the matter). The solution has to come from the whole of our society, not just one (or a few) individuals, and the first step has to be acknowledging that the status quo is a problem which needs fixing in the first place.

            Originally posted by Mianevem View Post
            On a positive note, I was really happy to read your post about turkey vultures. I barely know anything about birds, but I had to look them up specifically because they appeared in a text I had to translate for class. Reading about them again was exciting, because for once I already had a bit of background knowledge.
            I'm glad you liked my Turkey Vulture post! Sharing my love for and knowledge about birds and other wildlife is something I can do which I hope other people will find beneficial.

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              Thank you, NancyTree . I believe my community as a whole remains relatively safe. The situation at the farm has proven relatively easy to confine to the one location and there have been very few new cases elsewhere in my municipality over the past three weeks, even as the virus has continued to spread at the farm. Plus, I and my family are taking every precaution we can to remain as safe as possible.

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                Thank you, Fremen .

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                  I agree, CaptainCanuck . It is a fine line to walk sometimes, holding compassion for the suffering of others while at the same time not allowing ourselves to be overwhelmed by it. But we are better people for making the attempt to walk that line.

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                    May 18 Daily Dose of Nature

                    For Colin today we have some little brown birds.

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                    This is a House Wren (Troglodytes aedon). It is a member of the Wren Family (Troglodytidae) of birds which includes close to 90 different species, all but one of which are New World birds.

                    In Ontario we have five regularly occurring species of wrens and one occasional visitor. The House Wren is the most well-known of our wrens as it is a common backyard visitor and breeder. It is also one of the most widespread Passerine birds in the Americas, occurring from southern Canada all the way down to the southern-most tip of South America. Wrens are resident year-round in South and Central America, but those which breed in Canada and most of the United States migrate south for the winter.

                    House Wrens will nest in natural cavities, abandoned woodpecker holes, and human-made nest boxes (intentional and otherwise). Last summer we had a pair nest in the space between the eaves and soffits of our garden shed.

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                    House Wrens are tiny little birds, measuring 11-13 cm in length and weighing in at only 10-12 g. But they are fierce competitors for nesting sites who are known to harass and sometimes physically attack significantly larger cavity-nesting birds, and remove other birds' eggs from an occupied nest site which they wish to take over.

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                    By the time baby House Wrens leave their nest their plumage is already very similar to that of an adult bird, but new fledglings can readily be identified by their short, stubby little tails. Here is one of our babies from last summer:

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                      Rainbow Dragon beautiful pictures as always. I wish you all the best for the corona-situation in your area. In any case stay safe and healthy!

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                        I love the sound of the wrens, really distinctive. They are so small, you almost wouldn't catch them, but if you hear their sound, it's much easier to find them 😊

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                          Thank you for the Wrens, RD!

                          The British wren is: Troglodytes troglodytes: https://www.rspb.org.uk/birds-and-wi...bird-a-z/wren/

                          I love them! They're not very common and - as Nancy says - hard to catch sight of (your photos are amazingly good as ever) but they're very lively and even aggressive I believe. Great little creatures! Thank you!

                          I hope your locla situation stays safe, and completely agree with what you say. The situation is very similar here: now they are advertising fruit and vegetable picking jobs to UK residents and few people are taking them up because it means leaving your home for several months and paying for accomodation (caravans usually here) out of your wagers (which are not high) while you're there. I did fruit picking as a youngster, and it's incredibly hard work too.

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                            Monday, May 18 - Rainbow's Days of Fitness Day 26


                            Knee Push-ups Challenge - Day 9: 1:35 - done on my toes - 21 push-ups this day. 21/56 week-to-date for The Pushers Week #2.

                            Baseline (version 1.0) - Day 29: 19:30 - Level III with my mother. Almost done with this program so we started making plans this day for what to do next. Foundation Light contains floorwork, which my mother is not keen on, most especially the kneeling work which she is convinced she must not even try. So we discussed alternatives she could do in place of the kneeling exercises, and made a plan for how she could do the supine and side-lying work. (Meaning a plan for how she can get back up off the floor again afterward. The actual seated/supine/side-lying exercises are not a problem for her.)

                            I was happy that my mother was willing to discuss how she might be able to complete Foundation Light, and not just immediately turned off the program by seeing the drawings of a person on her knees. So I decided to roll with that momentum and told her I thought that, if we were still doing this a month from now, I thought she would be ready to tackle the Foundation program by that time, with just a couple of additional modifications.

                            "We can keep doing these exercises, even once I'm back at the Centre," she said. (The Centre = the local Seniors' Community Centre where she was doing some extremely gentle exercise classes pre-Covid19.) "I only have classes at the Centre three days a week. We can keep doing your DAREBEE programs on the other days."



                            Xpress Tone - Day 24: 9:55


                            Total: 31 minutes - Decided to take this as my short day this week in the interest of getting to bed a little earlier.


                            Other stuff:

                            11 minutes restorative yoga

                            Only Homemade Food - ​​ - Total Days: 138/138
                            A Salad a Day - ​​ - Total Days: 128/128
                            No Video Games - ​ - Total Consecutive Days: 159
                            No Seated Television - - Total Consecutive Days: 78
                            GBOT (10:30) - - Total Days: 45/96 - Two hours earlier than the night before though.
                            GOBOT (6:30) - - Total Days: 63/96 - Could not keep shorting my sleep so decided to sleep in as long as necessary to feel fully refreshed this morning in the hope of not needing to nap during the day and being able to get to bed earlier tonight as a result.

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                              It's great that your mother's so enthusiastic. I recently started Baseline with mine (version 2 though), but as much as she grew to enjoy the fact that she exercises for the sake of exercising, she doesn't have the patience for more than 3 sets. She doesn't even have the patience for any rest between those sets.

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                                "We can keep doing these exercises, even once I'm back at the Centre," she said. (The Centre = the local Seniors' Community Centre where she was doing some extremely gentle exercise classes pre-Covid19.) "I only have classes at the Centre three days a week. We can keep doing your DAREBEE programs on the other days."
                                This is a powerful habit you've started with your mom!

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