Replace Multivitamin with actual food

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    Replace Multivitamin with actual food

    So I have been taking a multivitamin after lunches each day and the price for sups just keeps rising. Does anyone know of a website that details what things I can eat every single day to get all the nutriants and minerals that multivitamins give? I'm assuming a good place to start would be to check what is in my mineral water and start each day with a very dirverse fruit salad, but I assume there are things I will need to snack on that wouldn't go well in a fruit salad.

    #2
    You might check out the Daily Dozen checklist. The aim, as far as I can tell, is to get a broad spectrum of foods and their related benefits every day. It has beans, berries, fruits, cruciferous veggies, greens, vegetables, ground flax, nuts and seeds, herbs and spices, and whole grains. All with their own daily serving suggestions.

    https://nutritionfacts.org/daily-dozen

    If you scroll down past the video, there is a chart with serving suggestions. If you eat meat/dairy you can probably skip the b12. There is also an explainer video here.

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      #3
      I believe, generally speaking, when you eat a variety of unprocessed natural foods you will get all the nutrition you need.

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        #4
        I used Cronometer when I was 100% vegan or semi-vegetarian. Was mainly concerned with amino acids being 100%. I have a good multi vitamin that gives 100% or more of daily needs but don't take one every day, also occasionally a salmon oil capsule. I have tried dark chocolate soy milk (heated) in the evening and have also tried almond + cashew + pea protein, these are fortified with vitamins and minerals.

        Being omnivore I seem to get everything easy, even the milk (chocolate and 2%) I drink is super fortified, B12, zinc plus lots. I use to buy cocoa but it's a bother to mix so just heat choc milk in the microwave.

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          #5
          Nutrition is limited to the intake of liquids. The patient gets water (without gas!) in small portions - 5-10 ml. The total volume of fluid intake is 500 ml. The main source of liquids, nutrients and energy during this period is parenteral nutrition. Meals of liquid consistency (you can find out about it here homecareassistance.co) begin to be introduced into the diet. Note that thick, pureed dishes or mashed potatoes at this stage is too early to introduce. Allowed unsweetened and weak vegetable broth, weak tea, mucous decoctions. Milk is still prohibited, as well as liquid cereal soups.

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            #6
            Eleganes, are talking ONLY about babies? I'm pretty sure spoonroot is talking about adult nutrition ONLY.

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