Garlic yogurt sauce

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    Garlic yogurt sauce

    For people looking for a bit of flavor to add to their meals without a huge amount of calories, here's a sauce that I make all the time. It was originally taught to me by an old roommate's mom but I tweaked it to make it less fatty.

    1 c. non-fat Greek yogurt or plain, unsweetened vegan yogurt
    1-2 cloves garlic, peeled and minced or pressed
    1/4 tsp. salt
    Pinch of black pepper
    1 tsp. good quality olive oil (I use a roasted garlic olive oil for more flavor with the same amount of calories as plain)

    Stir together or throw it in the blender if you want it really smooth. Chill for a few hours to let the flavors develop. You can also add cumin, dill, red pepper flake, cayenne, whatever spices taste good to you.

    Using the non-fat Greek yogurt I have on hand, the whole, 1-cup batch of sauce has around 180 calories and 16 grams of protein, 7 g carbs, and 4 g fat. I use 1-2 tbsp. on vegetables, chicken, grains or legumes. I sometimes use it in place of mayo to make tuna salad.

    #2
    This sounds really delicious! I like to just mix some yogurt with dried mint (or fresh), a touch of garlic and a pinch of salt.

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      #3
      Mint would be good in this, it works as a base for a lot of flavors. I've also chopped cucumbers or leftover grilled vegetables into it but it gets watery pretty fast when you start adding vegetables so it's good to use it up if you do that.

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        #4
        I’m not a fan of garlic but I like garlic yogurt with fries. galeogirl if you like cucumbers and yogurt combinations you can also try it as a fresh soup. According to Wikipedia those are the names Tzatziki, cacık, or tarator. Funny thing is for me all these 3 names mean different dishes.

        It should be watery like soup but cold. There is also a thing called yogurt soup but it’s different. Since it should be watery, you can use just plain yogurt instead of greek (whatever you want). Just add water to your combination, stir (by fork of whisk). Then add chopped cucumbers. You may also add red paprika or/and fresh or dried mint, dill. This is pretty popular in Turkey. It’s good in summer when you don’t want hot soup and mostly consumed beside main dish (like salads).

        I’m really bad in cooking (This is an understatement). That’s why I googled the recipe of what I’m trying to explain. You can see from the following links (Disclaimer I never try the recipes from the following links, I’ve just found them).

        https://www.thespruceeats.com/cacik-...-herbs-3274166
        and

        https://www.food.com/recipe/tarator-...e=US&scaleto=3

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          #5
          I'm familiar with the yogurt soups, where I live we have really large Greek, Middle Eastern, Eastern European, and Indian communities with lots of restaurants and festivals - wonderful food! I absolutely love to cook so I'm applying my kitchen skills to healthier eating as I learn more and more about nutrition and fitness.

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            #6
            Originally posted by galeogirl View Post
            Mint would be good in this, it works as a base for a lot of flavors. I've also chopped cucumbers or leftover grilled vegetables into it but it gets watery pretty fast when you start adding vegetables so it's good to use it up if you do that.
            Yes, cucumbers are great too! It helps if you grate them, add salt, mix and let sit for 15-20 minutes. Then you can drain/ squeeze out the water, before adding the yogurt

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