Plant-Based Plate Article: Why Couscous?

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    Plant-Based Plate Article: Why Couscous?

    I've read the new article "Plant-Based Plate" today out of interest and there's one thing that strikes me as immensely odd: In the "grains & starches" section couscous is listed as a regular type, with pasta labeled as "occasionally".
    My question is: Why?
    Couscous, basically, is not that much different from average pasta (both made from durum wheat semolina, salt, water, and in the case of couscous, often flour). As far as I know, many types of store-bought pasta comes with more iron and niacin, which personally I would rule in favour of pasta. So, why couscous but not pasta? When couscous got a bit more popular here, years ago, it was touted as a more healthy alternative to pasta by vegetarians (which it doesn't seem to be), but I wonder why it's still this way. Is there something I didn't get? Or is this still a remnant of the false presumption that couscous is a type of grain because it looks like that?
    Please help

    #2
    Nihopaloa that's an excellent question. Couscous is generally considered to be better than pasta because it is traditionally made from whole-wheat flour and pasta, traditionally, is made from more refined flour. However, your point is a good one. These days there are many types of pasta that are also made from whole-wheat flour and these are increasingly coming into the mainstream. We initially chose it because of this basic difference. But there are some inherent assumptions there. Let me bring this up in-house tomorrow so we can re-examine it. Thank you for bringing it up.

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      #3
      Thanks for your answer, Damer. Regarding your point:
      Couscous is generally considered to be better than pasta because it is traditionally made from whole-wheat flour and pasta, traditionally, is made from more refined flour
      it would be worth noting that (depending on where one lives) one really has to look for whole-wheat couscous, because most of the time (at least in the stores where I live) it's made from "white flour" with whole-wheat couscous being more difficult to obtain (and also being more expensive).
      Glad to be of help with my questions

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        #4
        If I hadn't been curious about the title I'd never have seen this mealplan/article. It intriques me and I think I'll start incorporating a plant based plate into my diet. then work my way to a fully plant based lifestyle.
        I have read that going plant based decreases muscular strength however so I may or may not, it depends, keep some meats in my diet.

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          #5
          Kakarot while I don't make it a secret that I'm not a fan of veganism (for myself, that is) I'd like to point out one or two things regarding going plant-based:
          - Think about why you want to go plant-based. You, in, you yourself. If you have the right reasons (again, for yourself), go for it. If it's just because, well, because, think about it once more.
          - Look into what it means to go plant-based and what you, yourself, need. I have the feeling many people who go plant-based do so badly-informed and end up doing worse than before. You (probably) can avert that by informing yourself and make necessary adjustments
          - Do what works for you. If 100% plant-based doesn't work, for whichever reasons (even if it's only a psychological thing) don't feel bad about re-introducing non-plant-based things again, like dairy, fish or meat. I have read in earlier posts here on Darebee that it's more important that you listen to your body and what works for you than to follow a diet, ideology, or whatever.
          - Have fun with trying out new things!

          Even though I'm not a fan, I have no problems with other people going plant-based but at least I wish for them that they go for it for the right reasons and that they don't feel pressured into some things. Whatever you'll do, I hope it works out for you

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            #6
            I have read that going plant based decreases muscular strength
            Kakarot I think on that one particular point science and knowledge has to trump myths. And this is one of these myths that have zero basis on reality.

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