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    Confused about workout/programme to pick.

    Hey hey hey!

    I am glad to meet y'all and I am new here as well. I am a 20 year old male and I've recently started getting back into the gym after a couple of months. I am 6 foot and my current weight is 95kg. My diet mainly consists of carb (culture and the place I am from) like a lot of rice. But I've also been eating a lot of junk food like pasta (6 times a month) or pizza (once or twice a month) lots of KFC, McD, etc. You get the gist. I am trying to fix my diet but I also would like to lose weight (targeting roughly 75-80kg) and perhaps, if I fix my diet a lot, plus some exercise, I should be able to lose so much weight soon. Time isn't an issue to be fair but I'd love to avoid any health issues in the future. I am willing to dedicate a lot of time to improving my weight and ready to do anything for that.

    Gaining muscle also would be incredibly lovely as well. I struggle with some personal issues like low-self esteem and more and I thought building some muscle while losing weight would help out.

    I am a little confused as to what programme or workout schedule I should be following as there are so many ones to choose from.

    I should also mention that my posture can do a lot of work. I would like to avoid slouching and while I do understand factors like chair and others do pay a role, is there any way I can correct it by exercise?

    Thanks and I hope to start my log to be more accountable in the future! Have a lovely day and thanks in advance!

    #2
    Wow! So much to work with, so much fun to be had!
    To start with first things first - Welcome to the Hive!! We're here to help and support each other, so if you have any issues, don't worry about them here - we're all nice. Feel free to discuss anything at all.
    Second thing: Take the fitness test to see what you're up to. Or just to set a baseline against which to mark future improvements. You do not have to do any of the exercises at the level this fitness test tells you. Me, I get bored easily so I don't tend to do so many sets - most of my work is done at level 1. Unless it's in a programme where I have been known to do 10 sets...
    Third: There is nothing that you should or shouldn't be following. There is nothing restrictive here. Choose what lights your candle. If you find an exercise that you can't do, don't worry, either adapt it or leave it out. Go through the programmes. There are some great ones for building and defining muscle. One of my favs is Ironheart. Use the filter option available on both the workouts and programme pages.
    Fourth: There is a couple of workouts on posture, and a month-long posture challenge. Of course, a lot of work can be done on posture simply by remembering not to slouch!
    And finally, have a look through the Guides because there is a lot of information about nutrition, muscle-building, and heaps of other topics. Enjoy!
    If there is anything else, just ask. Someone's always happy to help. Look forward to following your journey. Have fun.

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      #3
      Welcome to the Hive

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        #4
        Thank you all for your welcome wishes. )

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          #5
          If you want to lose weight, I'd recommend to not ignore building muscle. If you lose your desired 15 to 20 kg without building muscle, you might end up looking like a slimmer but softer guy, aka, the dreaded skinny fat. The good news is, building muscle will not only improve your aesthetics in the long run, but also helps burning fat. I like taking weights up for this. Think Ironborn or Ironheart, if you have dumbbells. If not, Body weight exercises are great, too, especially when you have some kilos too many.

          But in reality, the best program in the beginning is the one you'll stick with, that helps you build a habit. You're already going to the gym, but at what kind of level of fitness are you? That would help to choose, too. For example, can you do proper push-ups? Pull-ups? Doing any cardio? Do you have a favourite kind of exercise?

          As for poor posture, strengthening the core and back can already help. Often enough, the frontal muscles of the neck are weak. That leads to tech neck, the kind of posture you get from sitting in front of a monitor for too long. Facepulls can help. Or standing against a wall, heels, back and back of the head against the wall and tucking your chin in. Or lie on your back, flat, and lift your head a centimetre or two. Hold it for a few seconds, lower again, repeat. Is harder than it sounds, trust me, but helps building those muscles. There are many exercises to combat that.

          Oh, and welcome to the Hive

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            #6
            lofivelcro Thanks for your guidance. To answer your questions, I’m at a level 1. I’m not as fit as I’d hoped to be (used to play a lot of soccer and that helped me maintain my weight and get some exercise but that went down massively sadly) I do 45 minutes of cardio (15 elliptical, 15 treadmill at 6 speed and 15 cycling. I meant minutes sorry.) I don’t think I can do proper push-ups and I don’t really have any favourite exercises.

            i hope this helps a bit. Thank you again!

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              #7
              Ha, with level, I meant more like a personal estimate. I'm not familiar with Darebee's fitness test, never have done it myself.

              In that case, I'd just start with one of the level 1 programs, Foundation Light for example, and do that for a month. To build a habit and to experience various types of exercises. Use the old version instead of the new: https://darebee.com/programs/foundat...owall=&start=1
              I think the new version is way too easy and the old version has a greater variety of exercises, combat moves, for example. If you think that's too easy, try Foundation, again, the old version, for the same reasons: https://darebee.com/programs/foundation-2016.html
              Again, I'd recommend building muscle, especially if you're already doing cardio. It's up to you if you want to hit the weights for this, or keep to calisthenics. Compound moves are especially good in the beginning. Think squats, push-ups, pull-ups, leg-raises for body weight, or squats, bench press, shoulder press, bent over row and dead lifts for weights.
              You can also think about specific moves you want to learn, i.e push-ups or pull-ups and work towards that.
              But first, if you don't already have one, focus on building a habit. Keep it simple and perhaps short during the first month(s). Build a foundation and add to that. And don't hesitate to ask if you need more specific advice.

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                #8
                start with something like vitality or foundation (either regular foundation or foundation light) also do the flexibility and yoga weeks to help your core.

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                  #9
                  Actually, I started Ironborn yesterday and I enjoyed it very much. I liked pushing myself beyond what I thought was my limit. My only question is though, can I replace dumbells with machines or something like that?

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                    #10
                    For Ironborn? No idea. Better question: why would you? Sure, I'm a free weight purist but if you want to rather use machines, I'd say it would be better to look for another program.

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by lofivelcro View Post
                      For Ironborn? No idea. Better question: why would you? Sure, I'm a free weight purist but if you want to rather use machines, I'd say it would be better to look for another program.
                      I regret to inform y'all that starting from Ironbeast was a mistake as my arm now hurts for over 2 days now. I think I'll start with what you said - the foundations. I think it's a much better idea to start a habit of just moving as I sit around in a bench for most parts of the day.

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                        #12
                        Hmm, that sucks to read. Possibly reasons could be that your weights were to heavy and you overtaxed your joints, or your form was bad. It would be interesting to know how heavy your weights were and which exercises cause or caused the pain, as well as which part of your arm specifically hurts.
                        Either way, backing away for now and focusing on bodyweight is a good idea and better than stopping altogether. Good decision. If it gets too easy you can always add a challenge or something.

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                          #13
                          Originally posted by lofivelcro View Post
                          Hmm, that sucks to read. Possibly reasons could be that your weights were to heavy and you overtaxed your joints, or your form was bad. It would be interesting to know how heavy your weights were and which exercises cause or caused the pain, as well as which part of your arm specifically hurts.
                          Either way, backing away for now and focusing on bodyweight is a good idea and better than stopping altogether. Good decision. If it gets too easy you can always add a challenge or something.
                          It was recommended to be 8 so I did 7.5kg actually. I think when I started with bicep curls. And my triceps hurt actually. Yeah, like you suggested earlier, let me get acclimated to the workoutd for a month. That'd be greatly beneficial for me. Foundation 2016 here I come! Also, might be a good time to get started on a log.

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                            #14
                            Aw, man, again I wish Darebee would finally understand the importance of a proper guide to weightlifting.
                            My advice, if you want to pick up Ironborn or another weight-based program some time in the future: Pick VERY light weights and learn the exercises at first, if you don't know them yet. It's easier to learn proper form first and up the weights quickly, than picking a weight you can do the reps with without knowing proper form, learning bad form, and f*cking something up because you overdid it and used the wrong muscles/bad form.
                            But Foundation 2016 is a good program, you'll get to know different kinds of exercises, so have fun with it!

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                              #15
                              they have a guide to explain that in their guide section... but most darebee weights are optional same with the staff and katana i actually need to go out and find me a tree to make my bo staff again it sort of got lost in the midst of moving i had it since the summer i was heading into 9th grade and did a summer camp that had each member pick a tree to make their staff out of

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