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    Adventurer information required

    So I am building a grab bag, something I can just pick up and head out with. I'm just unsure what to put in it.
    Any ideas welcome

    Currently got a medical kit that need restocked.

    The bag itself is tiny, 10 or 12 litres so it has to be something that will fit and ideally multi purpose.

    #2
    Depends on what you plan on doing outside and how your environment looks.
    Here are some ideas from the top of my head:
    -a good knife (better put it on your belt, though)
    -hook and fishline
    -a whistle
    -dextrose
    -a flask of high percentage alcohol (wodka or the like will do the trick in a pinch and is preferred if you need something to boost morale)
    -flint and tinder/match sticks
    -twine and needle
    -binoculars are nice
    -a small notebook and a pencil
    -a cloth sack you can fold up really tiny, in case you find something and want to take it back with you
    -soap
    -a compass
    -hand mirror
    -a map

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      #3
      lofivelcro thanks 😊 this looks like more than will fit in my bag but I'll try and get as much as I can from your list.
      Got any tips on exercise for adventuring? I know walking endurance is good but in terms of strength what kind of exercise (push ups etc) could I do at home?

      I'm thinking push ups variations, dip variations, squat variations, running (short distance) and jump rope for cardio. I also have a kettlebell which I will hope to use when my finger heals for BJJ... actually that sounds like a solid list but what would you say are key aspects to train?

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        #4
        Edit: I have a hard time picturing a bag of 10 litres, anything coming to mind that compares in size?

        Honestly, I have no idea what kind of exercise would translate well to what you have in mind. Back in the days when I had my long trips I just walked. The only kind of exercise I had beforehand was walking, running, and playing football as a teenager. From my experience, mental endurance and grit was almost more important. The first time when I travelled to the neighbouring country by foot I was ill-prepared, had next to no food with me, was hungry all the time and didn't have good clothes. I also injured myself. In short, I was incredibly stupid. But grit got me to where I wanted to be. I would aim for walking endurance and carrying capacity if you want to take more gear with you at one point. Rucking or running stairs might be an idea. I would also practise going for long stretches without food or in the cold. Not necessarily outside, you can also do that at home at first.
        For other exercises, others might be more experienced. Maybe CaptainCanuck has some ideas.

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          #5
          Oh dear lofivelcro not the cold... I have an aversion to the cold... and too much heat.
          The only thing I can think of for a description of a 10 litre bag is a short and thin school bag. It's about the length of the thoracic and lumbar spine and width of a human torso.

          Oh I do not plan any cross boarder treks, maybe just walks around the coast.

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            #6
            I would suggest reading up on Hebert (French physical education pioneer). He broke all physical fitness into three categories- pursuit, escape and combat. With that in mind pretty much the entire world is your playground.

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              #7
              For mountaineering the "Zugspitze" we did need to run 3k in under 15min (age of 13) and for bigger excursions we had to run 5km (age of 15). That's what our guide teacher (very experienced guy) gave us as "final exams"...We did climb twice a week anyways... so in the wilderness some pull and push-up strength would not be a bad idea.

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                #8
                Try working with the cold, Aether, it's incredibly important, imo. Building muscle helps, from my experience. And moving. But a "simple" aversion shouldn't and mustn't stop you. I suppose you don't have a physical condition stopping you from working with it. So it's discomfort, and you'll benefit from conquering that.

                Btw, I appreciate your comparison but have no idea what that means
                Reminds me though, learning to properly pack a bag is another good skill.

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                  #9
                  Thanks HellYeah I can definitely do push ups but pull ups will take some time as I currently don't have access to my pull up bar and don't know when I will (my family has travel stuff occupying my home gym and my brother just bought a sauna so it's a bit tight.

                  lofivelcro it is mainly my feet that get severely cold after a long time. I do have a distaste of being cold but my feet and hands are the two main body parts that get cold. I don't have any problems or conditions that would stop me though.

                  I'll try and get a photo of the backpack tomorrow

                  Comment


                    #10
                    If you both cold hands and cold feet, it is quite possible that the problem is not that you are not warming your extremities correctly but rather that your core is getting cold and is likely not being insulated properly. In order to protect afainst cold the body decreases the amount of circulation to the extremities.

                    (Just a point of note, I have taken winter warfare courses in Canada.)

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                      #11
                      CaptainCanuck I am aware of that. I wear a Tshirt, hoodie and coat and when at the gym I started taking a flask of tea.

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                        #12
                        Cold showers, yes you can train your body or more likely the mind, to accept the cold. Start slowly and less cold and work towards colder temperatures...you can change back and forth from hot to cold if you like, but it is good to finish cold...

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                          #13
                          I often struggle with reynaud-syndrome in the cold months. Parts of my fingers and toes get white and painfully numb. Looks funny, but isn't. Moving a lot, bouncing on the spot, shaking arms and legs usually helps me. Eating citrus fruits too, but I've already mentioned that in your thread.
                          Try asking yourself what your definition/idea of being an adventurer is. In my mind, it's not always fun and games and you'll have to endure some discomfort, too. So preparing for that is a good idea. And helps you in other things in life, too. Imagine being able to stand the cold better, or hunger, or exhaustion, wouldn't that be great?

                          Edit: go full weeb and wear a belly warmer. Like Lorenor Zorro in One Piece.

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                            #14
                            I started taking cold showers but need to get back in to the habit [mental note: restart cold showers] and I'll be sure to plan it properly this time, working my way to really cold.

                            lofivelcro I don't eat any citrus fruit/I don't eat fruit period but I guess I should start. I know that being an Adventurer means a few discomforts but I am ill equipped to deal with it rn.
                            I don't know what a belly warmer is but it sounds funny. I'd weeb out by taking my swords with me on my adventures (fake swords). I need to work on my mental fortitude.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Fruit are nature's sweets and their packed with good stuff, you really should start eating them.
                              Here's something about belly warmers/haramaki: https://www.japanvisitor.com/japan-house-home/haramaki

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