Failure vs Fatigue

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    Failure vs Fatigue

    Hi all Hive members!

    I've been using Darebee workouts for several years now, and I've always enjoyed the "to failure" challenge that appears in some of the workouts. Lately that label seems to have been replaced with the term "to fatigue." Does this just reflect a new nomenclature in the fitness world for the same concept, or is there actually a nuance that should change the way I approach these workouts? If I were to read into the difference, "to failure" seems to suggest that I perform a given exercise to the point of full exhaustion (and/or until I can no longer maintain proper form), while "to fatigue" might convey that I should stop my reps when I start to feel a heavy soreness set into the muscles I'm exercising. Is that an appropriate reading of the difference between the two terms, and does that speak to a shift in Darebee's workout-philosophy? Or is it simply a new term for an old concept?

    #2
    Personally, I read "to failure" as "do something until you absolutely can't do it any more" and "to fatigue" as "do something until you're too exhausted to do it with proper form".
    Most of the time, "to fatigue" triggers the psychological reflex in me to do something half-heartedly, meaning, until I don't feel like doing it any more. I don't like the term, because it seems a bit soft to me.
    Maybe it shouldn't sound scary, idk. I've noticed that Darebee seems to favour a softer approach lately, imo, probably to not seem so daunting, so maybe it's got something to do with that.

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      #3
      Yeah, that first definition of "to failure" is how I'm always inclined to interpret it too. Then I realize that if I pass the point in a series of reps when I can maintain good form, just doing more reps is going to be useless, or even damaging. Though, honestly, for almost all of the fatigue/failure exercise I do these days I can maintain good form throughout my reps to the point of total exhaustion, so maybe the distinction isn't all that important. Thanks for the input all the same!

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        #4
        We have discussed this in other threads; darebee, as a community rather than (just) a fitness hub, is promoting a more welcoming approach to new-comers as well as people who felt like exercising has to be exhausting and therefore feared of starting... That's why, "Daily Dare" has renamed to "exercise of the day", because the word "dare" gives off a challenging vibe.
        It's true that I feel like it needs more challenging exercises, harder programs and less fear of making it hard in general, but then again, it's more important to make people who are starting their personal journey feel comfortable and confident that it's not as daunting a task as it seems at first...
        But that's just my humble opinion..!

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          #5
          GiorgosD For sure : ) I've picked up on that vibe from the site over the past year, and I think getting people to feel confident about starting their fitness journey is a great primary goal for the site, especially given the pandemic. My original question isn't intended as a position in a fitness polemical debate; just curious about the shift in phrasing.

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            #6
            From the "Xpress Tone" program instruction page:
            Exercises marked “to fatigue” are done until you can no longer do another rep using proper form. Keep going until you feel your muscles tiring. The rep count can be anything from 2 to 40 reps, depending on your current fitness level. If you can only perform an exercise once or twice until fatigue sets in, it’s perfectly ok.
            That's also what the expression "to failure" means, especially for compound exercises. When someone is doing isolated exercises, to failure can mean to the point where only partial reps are possible. So, "to fatique" is just a nicer way to say "to failure".

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              #7
              I kind of interpret both the same way. But that's just me. I like pushing my own limits all the time. That lands me in "exercise-fatigue" often.

              Those are (mostly) the times when I just leave my training logs and disappear from the Hive because I'm "burned out" on exercise. Luckily I've been active for a few years so eventually my body starts craving activity after its had its rest and then Nevetharine shows up randomly on the Hive again with a log- "Hello Bees!"

              I kind of like the "softer" approach, because it reminds newbies that they don't always have to exercise on Hard, there's Medium and Easy too. I think that makes it more sustainable and easier to turn into a habit.

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