Does Adding Weights to Cardio/High Burn Workouts Make Them More Like Strength/Tone Workouts?

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    Does Adding Weights to Cardio/High Burn Workouts Make Them More Like Strength/Tone Workouts?

    Hi everyone, long time no see! I just wanted to pop back in to ask a quick question. I like adding weights to every exercise that I do if applicable to make it more challenging, but I was curious about something. If I were to do a cardio/high burn workout in this manner (doing dumbbell squats and ankle weight leg raises for instance), would that that make it more like a strength workout? I've done a few cardio/high burn workouts of the day like this and that's what they felt like to me, but I wanted to get some second opinions. If I want to work my cardiovascular system, would I be better off doing these workouts with or without the weights?

    #2
    Hey welcome back.

    If you are trying to work your CV system then this is fine. It would probably not be the most efficient means of bulking, as that is usually anaerobic, but then again it would also build muscle over time.

    I often use the comparison of what are bodies are designed to do by evolution. Despite the fact that we can bulk up on muscle through weightlifting, this is not what we evolved for. As a species we are good at carrying moderate weight over long distances (among a lot of other activities), sometimes running, so the CV load should be fine.

    By the way, consider some resistance bands as well as they can help to add some resistance in exercises where weights are not easy to use.

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      #3
      Hello there! My take on this is, that it really depends on what you want to achieve. Meaning, what kind of "cardio"- the longform cardio (like, say running) is your gas tank- and hiit and other pace-oriented work is the quality or octane level of fuel going there. So, in my opinion, if you want to increase your muscles capabilities to work for much longer (say, to do 200 lunges in one go), then it might be wise to at least begin with bodywieght only. If you want to increase your more instantaneous cardio- the ability to "explode" rapidly without tiring (for example, doing a complex-burpee for 1 minutes amrap), then weights can be good. However, the form is king. Practice the form of the exersice first, beacuse even a "simple" burpee can wreck you if you land badly on your wrists. All in all i think if you like adding weight, do it. But if it starts to hamper form, and you feel strain from them, then stop. I also concur with CaptainCanuck on both of his points- moderate weight endurace and resistance bands. Both are very good tips. I would also add, if you want to try, weighted vests- you can fasten them to your body, so they dont hamper your mobility or seriously cahnge your body´s point of balance. Hope this helps, have a nice day sir!

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        #4
        CaptainCanuck Thank you!

        Yeah, that makes sense. My main goal with these is to work my cardiovascular system, so that’s good to hear. I use more strength oriented workouts to build muscle, like the Catalyst one.

        I used to use resistance bands a lot, but I haven’t in a long time since I switched to weights, because I find they’re more challenging and I like to have a more exact idea of what I’m lifting. That’s good advice though! But I’m curious, what exercises would this apply to? I find my dumbbells and wrist/ankle weights can cover most exercises, and anything they wouldn’t usually just needs a chair or bench to elevate my feet.

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          #5
          I guess that wrist and ankle weights would mostly have the same effect, though the specific mechanics would be different

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