New in town - Have some tips for ya girl in general/motivation?

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    New in town - Have some tips for ya girl in general/motivation?

    Hey everyone! Call me Fishmael (or, just Fish). I need to make some changes in my life. I'm 190 pounds and 5'1", and given my depression/anxiety issues (going to therapy, don't worry on that end) I need help motivating myself! Certainly, I am going to talk to my therapist about motivating myself, but I'm curious as to how you guys do it - How do you get yourself up and working out when you are struggling mentally? And what were your favorite workouts in the beginning? I look forward to talking to you all!

    #2
    Welcome f1shtacular !

    Motivation is easier if you have someone to share your workout with. Also you can do a log and have the community here rooting for you.

    Whatever works best for you

    Good luck and remember to have fun.

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      #3
      I am a big believer in inertia when it comes to motivation. If I really dont feel like something I will say to myself "just do 10 of anything". A body at rest stays at rest, a body in motion stays in motion.

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        #4
        I often find that it's getting up and starting that's really the hardest part. Oh, sure, there are workouts here that still kick me around, but usually the thing that's hardest is starting.

        My rule is that I just have to do one thing. Just one. That's enough. If I actually want to stop once I have stood up and started, that's fine. Bad days happen. But usually I find that once I have started, it's fairly easy to keep going.

        I personally find things like the 15 consecutive days of fitness to be really motivating. Wouldn't want to lose that streak, would I? (No, I really wouldn't.)

        Also, like Ryuji said, keeping a log here can be a really effective way to make some friends who will encourage you to keep going.

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          #5
          Find something that you enjoy doing.

          Motivation can get you through exercises that you find to be kind of a drag, but it's also something to be used somewhat sparingly and for me motivation regularly fails me entirely, leaving me only with exercises that I find fun.

          As you become sportier and lighter more exercises turn from drag to neutral to fun. So even if something is awful right now, it might be super nice later on.

          Personally I find machines way more fun than bodyweight exercises, I hate sit ups but like (assisted) pull ups. Running is eeeeeh, but cycling is nice. Swimming is fun, but distance-wise inaccessible for me. If the gym next-door weren't 60€ a month I'd be there a lot.

          Try stuff out, find what you like. Be aware that your workout schedule doesn't have to be super optimised or ideal or full-body or balanced, as long as it isn't physically damaging and you keep it up.

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            #6
            I started Darebee with From walking to running to support a friend. I used to do a lot of sports when I was younger so the program seemed easy enough that my ego wouldn't allow me to drop it. After a month I continued with The long run. At that point I was hooked.
            I'm still struggling to workout all year long because my work is very taxing but spending time on the Hive and learning from other's experience helps a lot putting things in perspective.
            Music is also great for motivation.

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              #7
              Start slow and work your way up for there. If you start out too fast you risk burning out. Always remember this is for the rest of your life not the next 3 months so workout like that. Spend 20-30 minutes workout out in the beginning forming the habit and getting your body used to it then move up from there. Before you know if your will be trucking along nicely.

              Also look at one habit at a time. While the magic recipe is diet and exercise I like to say get strong first then focus on the diet. The body is more primed to build muscle and recover when it has lots of resources so use that to your advantage. Once you get the workout habit going then take on the habit of a healthy diet (or even weight loss if the diet is already good).

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                #8
                Originally posted by Noen

                Whether I'd say to get strong or lean first depends heavily on where the person is. A man at BMI 26 can absolutely focus on strength first without compromising his health all too much, but a woman at BMI 36 neglecting weight loss is directly neglecting her health.
                Actually that's not what he said, I do agree that gradual change is easier that trying to change everything at the same time. Nutrition doesn't have to be perfect right away.

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                  #9
                  Noen A large part of what I was aiming at is that being new and currently full of resources building muscle is easy. This additional muscle will make the body as a whole more expensive to maintain so that even if there is little to no change in the eating habits weight tends to come off or at the very least there is a recomp with fat loss and muscle gain. Antidotally I find it much easier to workout at maintenance/surplus than in a deficit/diet fatigue, when starting a new habit where motivation is key it may just be easier to keep the diet the same. Inversely dropping weight first may lead to additional muscle loss since more will power would be spent on sticking to the diet and there would be fewer resources for muscle gain. I'm not saying either one is wrong though.

                  This is also a relatively short process in the beginning (3-6 months) so progressing to things like burpees would probably not happen yet. Sticking to low impact would be better overall for joints and tendons (planks and squats versus the dynamic jump outs and burpees)

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                    #10
                    Noen While we all have a steroid factory in our pants I will agree men make much more testosterone than women. I actually first heard of this approach from a female women's bodybuilding coach and really liked it. Her thoughts on it were exactly because men tend to have a better base muscle load when starting out especially when obese. They also tend to have better tendon health because of this. Women on the other hand need to start out slower and need that extra boost (fat does help us produce hormones that promote muscle growth up to 35-40% in men then it levels out, no idea on women but maybe add 5-10% since starting base is higher?). I would definitely go more towards the 6 months side since like stated women don't have the testosterone reserves men do.

                    Another point the lady made (I'm sorry I'm bad with names I will have to look it up but it was a Revive Stronger podcast with a roundtable of three women coaches) is women tend to get trapped in the high cardio cycle (thank you society) and the constant diet and end up just spinning their wheels. The slower strength first allows for a break from the "norm", makes the body more expensive overall for better fat loss later, and allows a slower introduction to caloric restriction leading to better food relationships long term.

                    I'm not saying this is the end all be all or that other methods are wrong just that this is another method that many people have found success using and it does address some easy pitfalls. You are very correct in that we don't know the full story.

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                      #11
                      Welcome, Fish.

                      When I was 15, I weighed 209 lbs at 5'5. I binged on candy and chocolate because I was so miserable, and had grown overweight despite being forced to play team sports.

                      And then I was introduced to weight training... absolutely loved it. Started going to the gym every day of the week; such was my intensity. What fueled me? I'd found something I loved, and actually enjoyed doing. I also constantly remembered how overweight I'd been, and how badly I wanted to avoid it.

                      I actually get restless these days if I don't get the chance to work out. Sure, I have some days where I take a break, but I tend to look forward to the next day/chance I get to exercise. When quarantine hit and the gym closed, I used Darebee workouts and combined that with walking laps around the local racecourse. Try out different activities; that might make it easier for you to motivate yourself.

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                        #12
                        Originally posted by Azercord View Post
                        Noen While we all have a steroid factory in our pants I will agree men make much more testosterone than women. I actually first heard of this approach from a female women's bodybuilding coach and really liked it. Her thoughts on it were exactly because men tend to have a better base muscle load when starting out especially when obese. They also tend to have better tendon health because of this. Women on the other hand need to start out slower and need that extra boost (fat does help us produce hormones that promote muscle growth up to 35-40% in men then it levels out, no idea on women but maybe add 5-10% since starting base is higher?). I would definitely go more towards the 6 months side since like stated women don't have the testosterone reserves men do.

                        Another point the lady made (I'm sorry I'm bad with names I will have to look it up but it was a Revive Stronger podcast with a roundtable of three women coaches) is women tend to get trapped in the high cardio cycle (thank you society) and the constant diet and end up just spinning their wheels. The slower strength first allows for a break from the "norm", makes the body more expensive overall for better fat loss later, and allows a slower introduction to caloric restriction leading to better food relationships long term.

                        I'm not saying this is the end all be all or that other methods are wrong just that this is another method that many people have found success using and it does address some easy pitfalls. You are very correct in that we don't know the full story.
                        I think there might be a mix up here about cardio, fat loss and diet.

                        I do agree that building strength is a great way to get started but it also means upping your calorie output which will most certainly trigger a weight loss even without changing your calorie intake.

                        So the whole dieting (don't really like that word) thing can be done progressively to something more sustainable. But since we don't know the current state of her diet we can't really know want to do there.

                        But I agree that thinking that weight loss = cardio is a big mistake also. And too much cardio when overweight can be more harmful than helpful.

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                          #13
                          I am pretty much addicted to excercise ,if i dont train for a couple of days i begin to question my existence just kidding ,for me its a habit since i was 7 now i am 30 been training all my life except a couple years of partying hard, motivation is simple it is good for me and i enjoy it i see it as a natural thing to do hope it helps

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                            #14
                            Hi Fish, welcome to the Hive!

                            For me, consistency is absolutely key, and by this I mean daily consistency. Establishing a daily practice of exercise gives you no excuse, you just do it every day. Darebee programs are great for that, because they have the balance built in, including active rest days. I'm a big fan of the Vitality program, because it's where I started! Square One is another good starting program, have a look at those and see which one appeals to you. Just start, make a commitment for 30 days, and see where it takes you. If you want some supplemental stuff, the Easy Cardio Challenge is a good one, and these are a few workouts that are beginner-friendly: Fundamentals, Launch Pad, Stop Gap. There are lots more in the workout database, those are the ones that worked for me early on.

                            You're doing this because you want a result, but in order to get to the result you will need to embrace the process. Get exercise into your life not as a chore or a duty, but as an act of self-care that energises and empowers you.

                            As others have mentioned, doing a daily log is a great motivator. Also, chase the streak badges and the program badges, they are very motivating. Read other people's logs too, seeing what they're doing and the challenges that they are facing is also motivating and inspiring.

                            Good luck, I hope to see you around the Hive!

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Welcome to the Hive f1shtacular
                              The posters before me gave excellent advice. I see a pattern here: Find a routine you can live with, something sustainable. Keep your goals low, but don't forget to set them. Use all the knowledge and empowerment this site can give you. You found a great resource. Show some love to the beekeepers if you are happy.
                              In times of low motivation, discipline will help you to keep going. Routine is the key here

                              I will say to myself "just do 10 of anything"
                              My rule is that I just have to do one thing. Just one. That's enough.
                              At that point I was hooked.
                              Started going to the gym every day of the week;
                              Establishing a daily practice of exercise gives you no excuse, you just do it every day.
                              After a while, it becomes a habit anyway and then the real fun begins. The programs are a great gateway-drug.
                              And don't forget: A workout is supposed to feel good after, not while you are doing it.
                              Good luck and all the best.

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