Exercising when the weather is hot

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Exercising when the weather is hot

    Hello fellow bees!
    It's starts getting hot there (about 25 C or more outside), and this means, that it's about 23-25 C at home during the day. I try to choose time for exercising when the sun is on another side of the building, but it's still pretty hot, and I'm sweating much. So I have a couple of questions regarding that.

    - I try to drink more water before the exercise and during the breaks. How much is enough? Is pure water enough, or is it better to use mineral water or add some salt (note: several years ago I was recommended to avoid added salt in my ration, due to risk of high blood pressure, so since then I don't eat specifically salty products like chips, and don't add any salt beside some amount that is already there in pre-made foods)?

    - Is it ok to take a cold shower after the exercise, or is it better to wait a bit, until I cool down, and take a shower then?

    - Do I spend more energy (in terms of calories burned), or it just seems so because I'm sweating more?

    Thank your all for you advices!

    -

    #2
    https://darebee.com/fitness/guide-to...t-weather.html

    Comment


      #3
      AglavraOwl The above link has a bunch of good information. Generally speaking, you can tell the level of your hydration by looking at your urine. It is said that at regular times that it should have the color of champagne, but if you are seeing that it is extremely yellow, then you are not hydrating enough. Conversely, it is possible to hydrate too much, so you would need to find a balance (though I think generally safer to over hydrate than under hydrate).

      Cold showers are fine, but understand that under normal conditions that cold showers have a pronounced effect on the body, that the body kicks into one of its survival modes, which affects blood flow and breathing. I know some people do take cold showers because of this benefit, though it can lead to problems if you are already approaching exhaustion (my wife, who is a nurse, explained it to me, but I forget the technical explanation). That said, this is the case with really cold showers. I tried it a few times after some long workouts, and it feels weird but it passes. You probably wouldn't have a problem if you are just having a slightly cooler shower.

      Comment


        #4
        I live at the "Sun Coast", where I get up to 99% humidity and 42ºC weather from July to September, and I have never, ever, in my life, taken a cold shower. I find that absolutely painful.

        As a general rule, if you feel very hot, you should not workout. Not in the outside at least. If you exercise in the street, wait until sunset before even thinking about it. Also, stay hydrated during the whole day. That link posted above is useful, to be honest.

        Comment


          #5
          Thanks for the link, it's very informative. I should search better before posting.

          CaptainCanuk, JMed, thanks for your detailed explanations too. It'll help me to organize my workouts better. Regarding cold shower, I didn't mean like extremely cold, just something to cool down faster. I recall, that in the previous year I was sometimes taking them right after coming home. Usually I don't workout outdoors. Though. it's sad that I had to postpone my nordic walking practice until it gets a bit colder (or start doing it early in the mornings, which is another challenge )

          Comment


            #6
            Not exactly a cold shower, but last year when it was really hot over here and I worked out I used a wet facecloth to rub down my body and let it dry with toweling me down afterwards. That was always very refreshing and not as hardcore as taking a cold shower

            Comment


              #7
              On the salt part of the question I never add it to my drinks but will add some to my food. The way I had it explained to me is that if salt tastes sweet you need more in you (not a ton but some to the food), if salt tastes salty you have plenty in you. I keep this application to food and not drink because I can directly taste the differences.

              I'm not sure if there is any science behind this statement but the taste of salt does change.

              Comment

              Working...
              X