How to keep water with me during my run

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    How to keep water with me during my run

    Hi all! When I run outside, it's usually in a stadium, so I can leave my backpack there. But, now I thought of starting running on the road... I have a problem though: how can I carry my water bottle with me? I thought of leaving it at a checkpoint, but I am afraid it will be gone, or thrown away... And having one bottle (even small) will be a setback. Also, buying a water backpack (camel something) is a quite expensive alternative... Any help would be great! Thanks a lot

    #2
    you can purchase a hand strap to carry a 100ml bottle.. you can carry in both hands so that balance is not off..
    or you can also use a fanny pack (a small one for runners) and carry your bottle in it..

    Comment


      #3
      vrsthe1 I have thought about buying that fanny pack, but I was worried it would not sit tight... Have you had any experience with it? Thanks

      Comment


        #4
        yes, I carry a bottle in a small bag strung tight to my back.. but my running shorts have zipper in the back, where I keep my bike keys, cash, change, papers and stuff like that, but it never did had any problem..
        But the other runners always felt its better with the hand strap rather than having a bag..

        Comment


          #5
          Just interrested: From what distance of running on, do you need to hydrate and how much? 100ml sound like a neglible amount of water to me. I am not much of a runner, but a friend of mine runs 6-8 km a day and I know that he is not carrying any water, but that's in Vienna not Greece.

          Comment


            #6
            Andi64 my bad actually, these straps come in different sizes.. some use them to have a little electrolyte drinks, some for small water bottles..
            In this case as GiorgosD is not willing to buy a water pouch I assumed he will be using smaller amounts..

            In my case I don't need any hydration during the run while practicing.. and all the places (including roads in our city) have drinking water available so that is never a issue..
            But when I go out of station to participate in a race, I generally carry a small bag that is tightly strung on back where I carry not only a small bottle but other things as well..

            Comment


              #7
              There are packs that have little water bottles specifically designed for them, that sit at the base of your back. I was looking into buying one for my wife, but I haven't yet. From what I get from the online reviews though, you do have to shop around for one that fits your body size otherwise it will be too tight or too loose.

              Comment


                #8
                GiorgosD A few thoughts:

                1. Run loops. I know a number of runners who drive to their ‘destination’ course and then run laps of various distances to ensure they have an even and sufficient water supply available at their car. For example, park your car near a lake that’s 2 miles in circumference. Keep your water bottle in a shaded spot (or better yet, a cooler) in the car or, if you’re not worried about theft of the bottle, place it near the car so it’s accessible. Then, after finishing each loop take a drink and carry on. This same approach applies to your house or apartment. Find a loop you can run so that you can use your house as a water staging area. You could also loop around an area with a known active drinking fountain - harder this year with COVID-19. I use this approach for restrooms (park at a restroom and run loops near that location to ensure I have access to a toilet on long runs especially if I'm taking energy chews which can rock the guys).

                2. Stage water bottles on a course. I think you alluded to this earlier and I know a lot of runners who stage water bottles prior to their runs - especially as they progress in distance. There are a lot of ways to do this. One way is to drive or bike your intended route before hand and drop off water bottles in discreet (shaded) locations along the length of the route. Another approach to this is to carry staged bottles with you on the OUT AND BACK run. As you pass mile markers, you can drop off the extra bottles which lightens your initial load and ensures you have access to fluid later on in your run. Usually runners who do this buy the tiny 10 oz water bottles and carry two of them on their run in pockets. Then when passing different points, they drop the bottles. For example, if I were doing a 16 mile run on an out and back course I would carry three bottles with me (2 10oz and 1 16oz). Then, I could drop a 10oz bottle off at the 3 and 6 mile marks which ensures I have fluids at the 10 and 13 mile markers as well as an extra bottle that I carry with me for the first 10 miles. You can get creative with this. I use this method when I run threshold cruiser or longer vo2 max sessions. I'll bring a water bottle with me to a staging area and use that as my start and finish point (similar to at a track). To more fully explain, if I plan on doing mile repeats, I would do a 2 mile warm-up to flat course that's 1 - 1.25 miles in length (depending on recovery time). At the start of that course, I would deposit my water bottles. I'd run my first 1 mile away from the staging zone, do a recovery session and then run back on the same course which would connect me with fluids.

                3. Find or create a water support group run. Most urban areas - and suburban areas with running clubs - host at least one supported long run a month. This means they have volunteers who supply water stations at various intervals. Similarly, when racing season starts back up, I know of a lot of runners who run along race routes or in races just to get access to the water stops. You don’t have to run the race, necessarily, to get water. Just run on nearby streets and carve over when you know there’s a water station coming up. Running clubs - especially big ones - often holdfree races for members and this is another way to have a supported run. Remember, just because it's a race for some doesn't mean it has to be anything more than a supported run for you. Everyone's goals and plans are different.

                4. Carry your water bottle in hand. I think this is the easiest, most practical approach to fluid intake and it’s the method I use most often. I carry a 25oz water bottle (squeeze bottle - I like Camelbacks because of the on, off valve and the insulation which helps a bit keeping the water cool) and after each mile I switch the hand that holds the bottle to ensure my arm doesn’t fatigue. If cool water is essential you can freeze the water the night before and let it thaw out as you run supplying ice cold water on all but the longest of runs and hottest of days.

                5. Purchase a water carrier. There are a lot of them. The hydration backpacks seem to be popular - I’ve never used one. The hand carriers also are popular but, in my opinion are a waste of money as they only mildly address hand fatigue from carrying a bottle, they still fatigue the arm but since they are hard to switch (meaning it takes more work to move the carrier from right to left hand to balance the fatigue) one arm tends to take the beating, and they still warm the water up. With that said, I have used other water slings and the best one I’ve found is a sort of fanny pack that positions the belt at the hips and the water bottle in the middle lower back. Mine is an Amphipod (it's an older version of this model: https://www.amphipod.com/products/hy...stealth-runner)

                6. Have a partner bike or with you on your run.

                7. Plan a course with water fountains or convenience stores where you can purchase beverages. This is similar to the loop, but can be more natural. It's easy to add a street here or there with a gas station of fast food restaurant where you can both stop to drink but also stop to use the restroom if needed.

                8. Plan a route that directs you past friend's homes and ask them to put water out for you...

                Comment


                  #9
                  Blair this might be the most detailed and best explaining answer I've ever had... Thanks a lot!!!

                  Comment


                    #10
                    How far are you running? Do you have to have water? With luck, if you're covering distances, plan routes around public parks with water fountains. Otherwise, stow a water bottle under a bush or out of sight. I do that and it's never a problem.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Warmaker I have a fear that someone will spit in it, or put something in... I know, it's irrational but that's how I roll... Anywho, what I may try is buy new bottles every day so I can check the intactness... Though a little pricey I suppose... Or I just make the leap of faith and trust humanity...

                      Comment


                        #12
                        A note on the hydration packs. While the are a bit expensive to start out I've had mine for 7 years of abuse and it is still doing great. They also ensure you have plenty of water (mine is the 1.5 liter version) and a spot for your phone (many sport one sweat proof pocket) and other items (gels/keys/pickles).

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X