Failure alternative

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  • Azercord
    replied
    I would see if you could set aside the time for it. That is my favorite workout by far. The first round took me just over 45 minutes, the last round was like 5. Do hard variations, push to your limit, and repeat. So worth it.

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  • MissSmilla
    replied
    I like the suggestions above. I remember doing that workout - I'm sure I was nowhere as fit as you are, but I scheduled it for a saturday afternoon so I would have a lot of time, and it took me 1.5 or 2 hours... My then-boyfriend also did a Darebee workout and between us, we steamed up the windows
    It was quite some time ago, but I remember being impressed at how quickly things tapered off. The first set took me about 45 minutes if I remember correctly (and at the best of times, I can do maybe three diamond push-ups), but after that, failure happened more and more quickly

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  • Fremen
    replied
    When I did the Avatar Upgrade program I also had to take into account the time factor and on the exercises to failure I chose the most difficult variations and combinations for the number of sets I wanted to do, in practice if you know your limits you can adjust your training so that it tests you progressively over the sets without really going to failure.
    JMed as you have pointed out, there are also exercises that depending on the degree of training are really difficult to do to failure


    P.S. One trick I used is to use burpees as fillers between exercises, they quickly take you to the limit

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  • thepresident
    replied
    I agree with Salishsea
    you can substitute the exercise with their progression or using weight to increase their difficulties.
    For example, you can substitute push ups with decline push up or archer push ups, squat with one leg squat

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  • Salishsea
    replied
    You could vary the exercises by using hand or wrist weights or execute the kicks veeeeerrrryyyy slowly keeping perfect form throughout. 100 squats is impressive but what if you keep perfect form while doing a 10-second pistol squat? Do the get-ups without using your hands. Do the punches standing on one leg until you tip, Combine the speed bag punches and squats. One arm push-ups, or push-ups with your legs elevated. 40lbs in your arms while you do calf raises on one leg. I dunno...make it challenging. As a "dude" surely you've tried some of those high-end variations. Push yourself.

    Hopefully one day you'll be giving me the same advice!

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  • JMed
    started a topic Failure alternative

    Failure alternative

    Hi all,

    I have a little bit of a problem with the Avatar program. I will be doing the 18th card soon and, as you can see below, is a "to failure" routine on every exercise.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	Screenshot_1.png Views:	0 Size:	275.6 KB ID:	691134

    I want to do 4 or 5 sets, but I have a time problem. In terms of endurance, I know my limit on some of those exercises, but as someone that does Karate and have been throwing punches and kicks for years, I can 100% tell you tht if I go for failure, I can easily do 10 minutes straight doing overhead punches, turning kicks, or calf raises for example. Also, more than a hundred squats a set. And I don´t want it to be taken as brag, but as a "dude, if I really do everything to failure, I will waste more than 30 minutes on every set", and I don´t have that kind of time.

    So, to solve this problem and do no more than 2 hours of exercise, what amount can I safely say "ok, it's not failure, but still cool"? I initially thought of 40, and while that is a fair amount of squats, it would be miserable for the punches and raises, for example. Then I thought, "hey, maybe 100", but while I can definitely do 100 turning kicks, that will take ages and would probably count more as a HIIT thing than a strength one.

    Any tip here?

    TLDR: What can I count up to, given the fact that "to failure" could be inifinite in some exercises?

    Kind regards
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