Doing 30 days of HIIT, want to know if it's a good program for me

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    Doing 30 days of HIIT, want to know if it's a good program for me

    Hello, I'm new to darebee and I decided to start with the 30 days of HIIT and the meal plan that comes with it, I'm on day 2 and enjoying it and have been doing level 2, I wanted to know if this is something that's meant to have me sore, I know that soreness or DOMS isn't a direct indicator for muscle growth but it's not a bad one, I also decided to add on total abs as it's a good one to throw on there, my goal in these two is to cut fut and build toned muscle, is this something that these two programs together can do? or is there a better 30 day program for cutting fat and building toned muscles. and also how do you know if you're building muscle outside of DOMS.

    thanks a lot guys
    - Tran

    #2
    Hi there! Welcome to the Hive

    It depends on what your goals are. See, you can either bulk (build muscle) or cut (lose fat) but you can't do both at the same time. That's because each of those comes down to nutrition.

    To cut, you need to eat less than your body burns, so it can turn to its reserves. I actually think for this HIIT is pretty awesome because it incorporates cardio and strength training, which helps to burn calories and to retain muscle mass. Also, make sure to eat adequate protein on a cut to reserve muscle.

    To bulk, you need to eat slightly more than your body burns in order to supply it with what it needs to build muscle. In other words, eat to gain some weight. Here I would focus more on a program like Iron Born, or another program that'll help with strength building. Here's a handy filter.

    Speaking of strength - you need to decide what exactly you want when it comes to building muscle. Do you want bigger muscles or stronger muscles? If you want bigger ones, you can get away with a higher rep count. If you want stronger muscles (you want to lift more weight) then go for lower reps with heavier weights or do exercises like push-ups slooooowly, or to muscle failure.

    In terms of DOMS, I've found it's not always a reliable indicator of muscle growth. Fit people who are used to exercise don't always experience DOMS, but they do build muscle when their nutrition and training is good. I'm speaking about my gym-days here. After a while of heavy lifting, I stopped getting DOMS even though I increased the weight nearly every week. So, obviously my muscles must've grown, it's just that it didn't hurt anymore.

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      #3
      Oh, and another note on strength vs size. You can still build muscle strength even on a cut, but you can't build the size.

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        #4
        Originally posted by Nevetharine View Post
        Hi there! Welcome to the Hive

        It depends on what your goals are. See, you can either bulk (build muscle) or cut (lose fat) but you can't do both at the same time. That's because each of those comes down to nutrition.

        To cut, you need to eat less than your body burns, so it can turn to its reserves. I actually think for this HIIT is pretty awesome because it incorporates cardio and strength training, which helps to burn calories and to retain muscle mass. Also, make sure to eat adequate protein on a cut to reserve muscle.

        To bulk, you need to eat slightly more than your body burns in order to supply it with what it needs to build muscle. In other words, eat to gain some weight. Here I would focus more on a program like Iron Born, or another program that'll help with strength building. Here's a handy filter.

        Speaking of strength - you need to decide what exactly you want when it comes to building muscle. Do you want bigger muscles or stronger muscles? If you want bigger ones, you can get away with a higher rep count. If you want stronger muscles (you want to lift more weight) then go for lower reps with heavier weights or do exercises like push-ups slooooowly, or to muscle failure.

        In terms of DOMS, I've found it's not always a reliable indicator of muscle growth. Fit people who are used to exercise don't always experience DOMS, but they do build muscle when their nutrition and training is good. I'm speaking about my gym-days here. After a while of heavy lifting, I stopped getting DOMS even though I increased the weight nearly every week. So, obviously my muscles must've grown, it's just that it didn't hurt anymore.
        Thanks a lot for your reply,

        for my baseline goals the main thing here is to cut fat since i have a really high fat %, it's been a long time since I've worked out so I'm at an insane 25% fat so the goal is to cut it, on top of that I guess the secondary goal is to get a nice baseline of muscle so like being able to do push ups more comfortably or have arms that aren't as noodle as mine currently are (I can do 6 push regular push ups where the chest almost touches the ground but after that muscles die on me).

        do you think those goals are too high or is it something within reason. I was thinking of taking on 30 days of gravity after this, since the hiit has been getting my heart going and I read that if you do put in your all you will be cutting fat.

        also thanks a lot for the DOMS response I was wondering that.

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          #5
          I think that's totally within reason.

          So what you will want to focus on is eating at a slight caloric deficit, while eating adequate protein and doing a bit of both cardio and strength wise.

          6 Push ups are fine. I started with 3 regular ones, and when muscles started failing I went down to do knee-push ups. As you get fitter, the number of reps will naturally increase.

          As long as you challenge your muscles (or your heart and lungs for that matter), they must evolve and adapt.

          The trick, IMO, is finding your edge and not crossing it. Know when to stop and when you can continue.

          In most cases, training to muscle failure means repeating the exercise until you can no longer keep proper form. If you can't keep proper form while doing it, it's better to stop than to risk injury.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Nevetharine View Post
            I think that's totally within reason.

            So what you will want to focus on is eating at a slight caloric deficit, while eating adequate protein and doing a bit of both cardio and strength wise.

            6 Push ups are fine. I started with 3 regular ones, and when muscles started failing I went down to do knee-push ups. As you get fitter, the number of reps will naturally increase.

            As long as you challenge your muscles (or your heart and lungs for that matter), they must evolve and adapt.

            The trick, IMO, is finding your edge and not crossing it. Know when to stop and when you can continue.

            In most cases, training to muscle failure means repeating the exercise until you can no longer keep proper form. If you can't keep proper form while doing it, it's better to stop than to risk injury.
            Thanks a lot, all my questions are answered

            Comment

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