Can recovering lost days cause problems?

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    Can recovering lost days cause problems?


    Little by little I started the Epic Five program and I have been training every day, but during the weekends I spend a lot of time busy and come home tired, because of that I recover Saturday and Sunday training on Monday the three days of training. A friend told me that it could cause problems and even muscle loss. That's true? https://darebee.com/programs/epic-five.html

    #2
    From the completely non-scientific standpoint, your friend doesn't have to live with your results, you do. Also there is almost no scenario where no exercise is better than some exercise (having some sort of injury or medical condition would probably be the exception.) I would personally say that it would cause more problems if you are finding reasons not to exercise.

    I haven't done Epic Five, but I have done a fair amount of weightlifting and body weight exercises. I have been forced to take a week off at a time for various reasons, but I would just go a little easier on my days back. In the past year when I was going to the gym I was doing upper body 2-3 times per week and after five months I had significantly more tone with those workouts and no appreciable injuries.

    Just a question though, on the weekend days can you work in something else to your schedule? Maybe something with mobility/agility/flexibility that is not going to take the length of a full workout.

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      #3
      HI Karkof I never workout on Saturdays and sometimes I take Sunday off as well. I definitly do not suffer muscle loss and I am in very good shape overall. If you need the weekend to relax and unwind, take it. Overdoing fitness leads to injury and/or frustration. If it feels right for you, do it.
      Good luck and all the best

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        #4
        Originally posted by Andi64 View Post
        HI Karkof I never workout on Saturdays and sometimes I take Sunday off as well. I definitly do not suffer muscle loss and I am in very good shape overall. If you need the weekend to relax and unwind, take it. Overdoing fitness leads to injury and/or frustration. If it feels right for you, do it.
        Good luck and all the best
        I think you got me wrong, it's not the rest that would make me lose muscle, but over training. He told me that over-training can get me into trouble.

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          #5
          Originally posted by CaptainCanuck View Post
          From the completely non-scientific standpoint, your friend doesn't have to live with your results, you do. Also there is almost no scenario where no exercise is better than some exercise (having some sort of injury or medical condition would probably be the exception.) I would personally say that it would cause more problems if you are finding reasons not to exercise.

          I haven't done Epic Five, but I have done a fair amount of weightlifting and body weight exercises. I have been forced to take a week off at a time for various reasons, but I would just go a little easier on my days back. In the past year when I was going to the gym I was doing upper body 2-3 times per week and after five months I had significantly more tone with those workouts and no appreciable injuries.

          Just a question though, on the weekend days can you work in something else to your schedule? Maybe something with mobility/agility/flexibility that is not going to take the length of a full workout.
          The Epic Five literally takes five minutes to complete. It's just that on weekends I wake up and go out, and only come home late at night.

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            #6
            1. Overtraining can lead to problems, most likely injuries.
            2. Working out for 15 minutes in one day is not overtraining.
            3. The Epic Five workouts are organized such that each day has a different focus, for a five day rotation, before the cycle repeats. If you do three days at once, you're going to end up doing, for instance, 5 minutes of upper body strength, five minutes of leg strength, and five minutes of core strength all on the same day. Unless you have some sort of medical condition for which working out is contraindicated, this should be no problem at all. (The program really only has 4 different training foci--upper body, lower body, core, and cardio. The "Challenge" days are a duplicate of one of these. So you will end up getting 10 minutes of the same focus on days when a Challenge workout falls on your triple-up day. But again, barring a medical reason for not exercising, this should not be a problem.
            4. Some people like to workout every day. Others regularly take one or even two days off each week. This is true even of elite level athletes. Either schedule is fine, provided that it is one you can work with.
            5. Taking six days off each week and only working out one day/week is not advisable because you won't be able to build a decent conditioning base that way. So-called "weekend athletes" are likely to sustain injuries because they don't have a good conditioning base and then do tend to overtrain on the one or two days when they workout. But working out for five days and then taking two off should not be a problem. (Especially if the reason you are not training on weekends is because you are out and about all day. I'm guessing this means you're at least spending a fair amount of time on your feet, walking around. You're not taking two days off to sit on your butt and watch television.)

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Rainbow Dragon View Post
              1. Overtraining can lead to problems, most likely injuries.
              2. Working out for 15 minutes in one day is not overtraining.
              3. The Epic Five workouts are organized such that each day has a different focus, for a five day rotation, before the cycle repeats. If you do three days at once, you're going to end up doing, for instance, 5 minutes of upper body strength, five minutes of leg strength, and five minutes of core strength all on the same day. Unless you have some sort of medical condition for which working out is contraindicated, this should be no problem at all. (The program really only has 4 different training foci--upper body, lower body, core, and cardio. The "Challenge" days are a duplicate of one of these. So you will end up getting 10 minutes of the same focus on days when a Challenge workout falls on your triple-up day. But again, barring a medical reason for not exercising, this should not be a problem.
              4. Some people like to workout every day. Others regularly take one or even two days off each week. This is true even of elite level athletes. Either schedule is fine, provided that it is one you can work with.
              5. Taking six days off each week and only working out one day/week is not advisable because you won't be able to build a decent conditioning base that way. So-called "weekend athletes" are likely to sustain injuries because they don't have a good conditioning base and then do tend to overtrain on the one or two days when they workout. But working out for five days and then taking two off should not be a problem. (Especially if the reason you are not training on weekends is because you are out and about all day. I'm guessing this means you're at least spending a fair amount of time on your feet, walking around. You're not taking two days off to sit on your butt and watch television.)
              Thank you Vey much, you took a big question from Thank you really much, you took a big question from me and really helped me. I am really grateful for the help. help. Thank you!

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