Strength Training

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Strength Training

    I am currently doing Catalyst, (full body). I was going to change up every week, keep from being bored. And keep my muscle guessing. But now I think I should keep doing it for this month.
    How often should a person change their strength training program?

    #2
    PETERMORRIS966 Personally I prefer the workouts over the programs for that reason, as I choose two to five workouts per night and just kind of take what comes at me.

    If you are ever feeling bored then try to work in something else. I also mix in a lot of youtube videos and tend to not repeat them at all.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by PETERMORRIS966 View Post
      How often should a person change their strength training program?
      The question is very interesting and the answer is not easy and is (very) complex.

      One aspect is how is "amazing" the workouts that one is doing or that wants to do. If the approach is a full body one, the training seems more boring since during a week there is some repetitions of the same workout.
      However consider that one of the basis of strength training is constancy and perseverance. Thus, it's not good a frequent change of workout.
      Another important aspect is progression. Thus, to the "same" think in a harder way.

      The gains in strength are not linear (notably, they are linear only in first "moment" which one is training strength). Thus it's not possible to work always at 100% of own possibility, and your body needs time to recharge.

      Why a write all this thing? To explain roughly and in a fast way, the reasons because in a strength training is need a periodization (of training).

      the way to perform such a periodisation depends by the goals to achieve., and determines the duration of a training cycle. After that cycle, there is typically a deload phase (e.g. a week) and then start a new cycle based on the previous results (e.g. change of exercise, of load, …). A standard way for low level of strength is that the cycle lasts 4-5 weeks (and now it's my policy)














      Comment


        #4
        CaptainCanuck thepresident Thanks guys. I appreciate your feedback.

        Comment


          #5
          PETERMORRIS966 thank you for bringing this question up and as thepresident mentioned strength is a complex issue. For some of its complexities read my post on Strength VS Size. That should also indicate that when it comes to training for strength the goals you set determine the how. If you're going for endurance, for instance, where muscles can perform a task again and again without tiring then doing a program (or a workout) until it begins to feel easy is the best indication. If you're going for explosiveness (strength that is released quickly at short notice) mixing things up is usually best.

          What I will add here to supplement all these comments is that we now know that at a cellular level changes take approximately three months, (i.e. twelve weeks) to manifest themselves at which point they are regarded as epigenetic. So, if you're reaching for a particular goal and you want that goal to take you to a new level so you level up, a twelve week period seems to be the thing. Of course that is for specific fitness goals. We could still mix and match every day using workouts that are different but which nevertheless target similar muscle groups or help us reach similar fitness goals; so boredom doesn't kick in. I hope this helps.

          Comment


            #6
            Damer It does. I realize I need to actually set fitness goals, more than “workout 4-5 times per week.” I would like to add a little more muscle mass. I was going for the “ancient Greek body”, although I think my “best due date” expired a decade or two ago🤣. This year I would like to be able to run 20 km. I can do 10-12 km.

            Comment


              #7
              PETERMORRIS966 I totally get the motivation part. This is something we all really struggle with. You may want to check out my more in-depth post on motivation and how to make it stick. There are no magic formulas and we all need some assistance but, at least, if we understand how it works we can make ourselves be more willing to do what it takes. An "ancient Greek body" requires some work. Good goal to have

              Comment


                #8
                PETERMORRIS966 I was going for the “ancient Greek body”
                Like Charles Atlas ?

                Click image for larger version  Name:	gg02.jpg Views:	0 Size:	254.4 KB ID:	646830


                Comment


                  #9
                  thinman Thanks for the article!

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Damer What if you want to be able to do an explosive movement for many times in one go? Should you go for endurance training?
                    PETERMORRIS966 Sorry for hijacking the thread.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by PETERMORRIS966 View Post
                      thinman Thanks for the article!
                      Peter, You can read all of it and others here . . .

                      https://web.archive.org/web/20131023...reekGod/gg.htm

                      Comment


                        #12
                        kandy that's an interesting question and, as most of the subjects we discuss these days, it has a complex answer. First, to define what the muscles do: they do work, as in contracting and producing energy as a result. We use that energy to do what we want: lift weights, jump high, sprint, jog etc. So, in a very broad sense endurance is the ability to work for a long time and explosion is the ability to produce a lot of energy (i.e. force) in the shortest possible time. What changes between the first and the second is the speed at which the muscles contract. But that is a mechanical answer.

                        We are not machines or, at least, not just machines. We are complex, nested, biomechanical systems. In order to do something explosively we use ATP and our muscles work anaerobically we can do that however only a limited number of times. The reason we can only do that a few times (think sprinting at top speed or punching with all our strength) is that muscles that work at near top capacity also sustain some mechanical damage which de-strengthens them which means that we then lose force next time we do it. The more we try to force them then the more damage they will sustain and so on. One of the reason Olympic sprinters can only sprint at top speed once or twice.

                        That shows that repetition (punching a bag 1,000 times or jumping onto a box 20 or so times) is more than just explosiveness and the ability to repeat it. It requires the engagement of long-action fibers but also, in order to sustain the force output (i.e. the energy) we need, they also have to be stronger than usual at individual muscle fiber level. In that regard we sacrifice a specific power output (let's give it 9 or 10 out of 10, for argument's sake) for repetition. So, when we train for endurance we aim to produce 6 or 7 out of 10 many times as opposed 9 or 10 out of 10 a few times. The training for each is, by definition, different.

                        I hope this is clear (it is a complex issue) if not please let me know and I will add more explanation.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          kandy No problem. I learn from your question & Damer answers!

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X