Writing workout programs

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  • Kakarot
    replied
    Yeah Northern Ireland has always had trouble, and the political problem is quite large. Where I live doesn't have a mayor and the mayor of the closest large city is catholic (I personally have no issue with him being catholic but I live in a protestant town, there would be problems I think. And from what I've heard of him, he's unreliable).

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  • Nihopaloa
    replied
    While I can see that Northern Ireland has huge problems (always had, didn't they?) I don't think you need to go to a national level with what CaptainCanuck proposes. What about the government of your district? In many countries, small local projects like what you have in mind get funded by smaller, regional bodies of the government. Maybe get some people together for a nice skipping event, invite the mayor of your district (he's got a handy form for requesting his attendance on his webpage ) and get the ball rolling.

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  • Kakarot
    replied
    Government the government in Northern Ireland is near death. They had an election in November and that didn't sort it out so there's another in a month. The politics in the UK are as bad as the ... take a breath. I don't want to get involved with the government as they can't even sort their lives out.

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  • CaptainCanuck
    replied
    Kakarot Just another point, have you thought of approaching local government? Exercise programs are a pretty low cost way of making things cheaper (healthier people are generally cheaper for society). You might be able to put together a proposal to get some funding.

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  • Kakarot
    replied
    Thanks for the feedback. I think I am going to do as Nihopaloa says though as she has given me a push at the correct time to go through with the skipping. I'm putting in for some money (for clothes and to get a Nintendo Switch for my brother) then I'm going to buy some quality skipping ropes, yoga mats, my insurance and pay for use of the local church hall.

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  • CaptainCanuck
    replied
    Just another thing to consider is that the types of workouts on Darebee benefit from having a full range of motion. It is all good that people might want to work out on exercise equipment, certainly it is better than doing nothing. The problem is that people are more likely to get injuries if they do not have a full range of motion, so it would be better to mix the two.

    As Damer says in another thread though, what you are doing is admirable, because you are reaching out to people to let them know that they don't have to do this alone.

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  • Nihopaloa
    replied
    Personally, I'd also like to throw in the following point: If you use ready-made workouts (like Darebee, for example) you know that they're tried and tested. If you write workouts or whole programs yourself, you are responsible for them. At first, it might look like nothing much can go wrong, but if people feel like they take "damage" from one of your own workouts, they could try to make you responsible for that. Or, another take, you might feel responsible for that.
    When you use tested programs, you can be more sure that they probably will be harmless.
    If I were in your shoes, I'd start with your original plan to get some people into rope-skipping. They're fun for you, you like them, spread that fun and get people to exercise with ropes. I can imagine that you can be a good inspiration with your love for skipping.
    Regarding that outdoor gym, maybe see if you can find a few other people that are interested, play around with them, try some workouts, and see if you can spread the word from there. But really, I think you would do great with the rope-skipping for a beginning (bonus points: ropes are inexpensive so people can take them home and continue their exercise there).

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  • thepresident
    replied
    The easy way is starting (as suggested by Shikari) on well structured programs. In this way, you can be like a giant, since you are on the shoulders of other giants.
    Writing a program seems easy, but there are a lot of thing to consider and choiches that must be done (e.g. goals, exercises, number of sets, number of reps, rest time).
    As a matter of fact, I totally agree to Damer: writing a program is an hard work and needs a lot of experience and knowledge (and many tests on the filed to understand the results).

    Moreover, the unique point is not design a single program (which last e.g. ome month), but there is also make a long/mid term agenda, where periodization is one the important key.

    If you a specific question I think that many darebee can help you. On the other hand, the discussion it's very very general and, it could be a interesting discussion but not be very usuful, since it could be more abstract.



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  • Damer
    replied
    Kakarot I think Shikari gave you the best suggestion. Each program we create draws on collective knowledge and expertise from the team that amounts to over 60 years of collective experience. There is no one person creating anything. Then, once it has been created it is tested in-house and then it undergoes a three-four month long process of testing and refinement with volunteer groups who test it for flow, accessibility and results with different age groups and skill levels. Programs undergo a similar process with a six-eight month long test time. I mention all this here to show how difficult it is to do right.

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  • Shikari
    replied
    Sounds like a nice set up πŸ‘. That's a lot of great equipment. Instead of writing a new program, it might be wise to take advantage of the exercises already available.

    Get your crew to join Darebee and take a look at Ironborn, the pull up challenges, the Mason workouts. Also, if you want to go outside Darebee's selection there's a lot of crossfit WODs that are online. I found a pdf of 100 home workouts as the first result on my web search.

    ​​​​​​The upper and lower body dumbbell work outs can be adapted to exercise machines also.

    I hope some of these ideas help. πŸ™‚

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  • Kakarot
    replied
    Chest press, seated row, pull up bar, assisted pull up, hand bike, cross trainer, leg press, shoulder press, lat pull down, sit up bench with triceps extension bar and step up boxes (3 heights). They're all "bodyweight" loaded but the hardest is the pull up and shoulder press.

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  • CaptainCanuck
    replied
    Kakarot what equipment is there?

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  • Kakarot
    started a topic Writing workout programs

    Writing workout programs

    Hey so just before Christmas I started a Facebook group and it is fitness focused. In my wee town there is not a lot of fitness groups or inspirational people to get people started but I want to do both be that inspirational person and get people exercising.

    About three years ago the local council put in an outdoor gym and it gets used very infrequently and mostly not for its intended purpose.

    I want write a program, based on the equipment available in this outdoor gym for me to use and get, at least the people in my group, to start working out.

    Damer Redline neilarey TheRaven I ask you please to help me

    Anyone else who can help, please do as all information is appreciated.
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