Any good exercises in preparation for hiking?

Collapse
X
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Any good exercises in preparation for hiking?

    Ok, so I am planning to go on a big hiking trip with some friends this summer, and I want to feel prepared to do it with ease. I've been told I look pretty ripped, but I honestly have zero confidence when it comes to cardio. I did a similar trip a couple of years ago when I was less muscular, and it was pretty tough, but now we are planning to do a lot more miles.

    I was hoping some of you guys had some good exercises that would help, preferably ones with no equipment, or something like a backpack and a few lightweights (I usually only do bodyweight exercises).

    I also want to know if there are any good techniques to use to get your mind off of the boring drum of hiking/running/cardio so I can build my stamina without putting myself in pain while doing it.

    #2
    Bender B. Rodriguez try and do mini hikes as similar to the terrain you'll be hiking in.

    If you're doing a single day hike of 20km with a 8kg pack, work up to hiking that distance (do a few 3-5km walks on hilly terrain with a heavier pack, and then every weekend or fortnight do a longer hike to work up to your max distance). If you're doing a through hike/multiple days, make sure to practice that (i.e. do 5-10km/day several times per week, and then every second weekend do two days of longer hikes).

    When I train for hikes, I'll usually maintain my normal exercise routine (so either a KB routine or a barbell routine) and then hike/walk a particular distance on a specific terrain with a specific weight, afterwards, so I'm walking when I'm fatigued. I found this worked when I went over to hike around Nepal earlier this year. Make sure to do the walks in the shoes and socks you plan to hike in, and also with the pack and hydration system you plan to use. You shouldn't be hiking at a pace where you injure yourself-when you're walking with weight up a steep terrain, you'll find you pace will drop back to somewhere between 2-5km/hr (again depends on terrain type, elevation level and fitness level).

    I find when I'm doing hard hikes that having an old school mp3 player loaded with a tonne of music helps power through.

    Running helps with general cardio, but it's not going to be as beneficial as actually practicing hiking with a pack.

    Comment


      #3
      I think the Calves of steel challenge could be useful too. Even better if doing several rounds adding gradually some weight.

      Hope it helps...

      Comment


        #4
        Honestly, just walk a lot! I went on a hiking trip to Jotunheimen in Norway last summer. When I started preparing for the trip, walking 6 kilometers at first and then working my way up to 24 kilometers, it was surprisingly tough at first! I think it's important to do some walking instead of relying solely on bodyweight exercise. I thought I was in good shape, but I noticed that you really do need to train the walking part in addition to your regular workout routine. It's also good to note that variable terrain will make a hike significantly more difficult. Just because you can walk 24 kilometers in your hometown doesn't mean that you can do the same thing on the hike! You should account for that when training and add some distance on top of the maximum distance you're planning to hike.

        Comment


          #5
          What fláráðr ljós said. Best training is walking, walking and walking again. Last year i went for a hiking tour in Austria. Every day around 20-25km. I would say iam overall fit and it was still tough for me. In my opinion you can't train hiking very effectively via workouts/programms at home.

          Comment


            #6
            I had a buddy who did tons of hiking and mountaineering in the Rockies. He would climb stairs in his apartment building for exercise...all the way up and all the way down 20 story's and repeat for how ever many times he needed. He also wore a back pack with a sand bag in it for this and carried dumbbells at times. That sounds extreme...but he did some pretty extreme hiking.

            Comment


              #7
              Bender B. Rodriguez All good suggestions above. What I do on leg days is called a ruck-stair squat pyramid. Climb one set of stairs, do one squat, climb the second and do two, all the way up to 20. You can use a ruck, but I just bought a weight vest off of Amazon and filled it with sand. It probably weighs 40-50 pounds.

              Other than that just work on your step count. There are lots of different ways to work on your step count which doesn't mean just pounding the pavement for hours. Maybe check out a larger public park and work on some skills that are complimentary to hiking such as tracking or navigation.

              Comment


                #8
                There is a book I used to train for the PCT. It’s called The Outdoor Athlete, by Courtney Schurman aand Doug Schurman. It has training plans for performance at outdoor sports. The training plans for hiking are varied nicely depending on your planned adventure. They include specific strength training days and specific cardio of various intensities, as well as specific hikes to take to get the altitude and cardio piece. I really liked the book.

                Comment

                Working...
                X