Bulking for Skinny People/Hard Gainers?

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    Bulking for Skinny People/Hard Gainers?

    Hey everyone, my name is Alex. I’m from Ohio. I am 6’1” and weigh approximately 144 lbs. I have tried doing research on bulking up and tried making some of my own workouts but to no avail. I can’t particularly control my meal plan too much as I live with family, but I would not mind help figuring out how to bulk-up. And if this could be a pinned thread that’d be much appreciated because I’m sure I’m not the only one in this situation. Thank you!

    #2
    Originally posted by SamFlynn82 View Post
    I can’t particularly control my meal plan too much as I live with family, but I would not mind help figuring out how to bulk-up. Thank you!
    I guess that is the key point. You need a slight caloric surplus and a good amount of protein to gain muscles, are you able to add some protein (milk, thuna, meat) over the day.

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      #3
      Hi Alex! First, start keeping track of what you're eating. That's the most important step to seeing trends. Just write it down, with the date and the approximate amounts. You don't have to be super precise about this in your circumstances; you can write: Saturday, October 12, dinner with family; mashed potatoes, ham, green beans, dessert. That will give you the information you need going forward.

      For each meal, try to have some protein. If there's no protein in the meal, have it before or afterward. If you consistently have trouble with including protein, consider a supplement like whey protein powder or casein protein powder. It's simple to order one on Amazon--ON Nutrition is a good, basic, affordable brand.

      And to put those calories and protein to good use, you'll need an exercise program based around strength training. You can pick one of the comprehensive 'strength' programs from here: DAREBEE programs, or choose individual workouts using the DAREBEE workouts filter, sorted for the equipment you have and your fitness level.

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        #4
        The ultimate solution is ultimately going to be increasing your intake. And patience.

        I was in a similar boat years ago: I'm about 5' 11", graduated high school weighing approximately 120 pounds. Played sports but never really exercised regularly for the sake of it. Changed that - started exercising regularly at age 25, at which time I weighed 126 pounds. Over the last ten years, I've gained about 50 pounds and have reached my goal weight of 175 pounds.

        (1) You have to be patient. It takes time to gain weight healthily. As above, it took me ten years to reach my goal weight.
        (2) Set a goal weight. You need to know where you want to be, otherwise you won't know if you're making real progress.
        (3) You have to increase your intake. When I started out, here's what I did: (a) Woke up early and had a small breakfast of peanut butter toast, coffee, and half a protein shake. (b) Exercised for an hour with an emphasis on heavy lifting. (c) Had a second breakfast including an omelet, full protein shake, and peanut butter toast. (d) Then, every 2-3 hours throughout the day, I would have some sort of snack of nuts, cheese, or something else rich in protein and fat. (e) Continued regular meals (lunch, dinner) as usual. (f) Finished the day with a creatine shake. This process gave me about 30 pounds in the first nine months.
        (4) Resistance training is your friend. Cardio is important for overall health, but if you want to gain weight, your focus needs to be on lifting and moving heavy weight. That doesn't necessarily mean you need a gym membership, but weights are going to be the fastest way to reach your goals.

        Again - patience. Everyone wants results fast, but seriously - if you want to gain weight in a healthy way, it's going to take time. Probably longer than you think, or longer than you want.

        Good luck!

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by HellYeah View Post

          I guess that is the key point. You need a slight caloric surplus and a good amount of protein to gain muscles, are you able to add some protein (milk, thuna, meat) over the day.
          I do have protein shakes after workouts (generally two scoops of whey protein for 48 grams of protein) and we typically have chicken for most dinners, and I eat chicken salad sandwiches for lunch

          Comment


            #6
            SamFlynn82 as the others have said, ultimately to put on weight/mass you need to eat more calories than you use.

            Check out this calculator here: https://tdeecalculator.net/result.ph...=1.375&bf=&f=1 . It gives you a good starting point for how much you need to eat to bulk up (if you're doing some light exercise, you'll need something like 2500 calories minimum). As the others said, track your meals, figure out if you're reaching your calorie and protein goals, be patient (stick with a plan for at least a few months) and make adjustments as required.

            You're also going to need 200+grams protein per day, so things like your protein shakes, chicken/turkey/fish, greek yoghurt, eggs, cottage cheese, nuts, and milk will need to be consumed in significant amounts throughout the day. The other thing to factor in is that building muscle takes time, so you'd be looking at results in months if not years, rather than weeks.

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              #7
              Rahx i know it’ll take longer than a couple weeks but this isn’t my first attempt either. I keep ending up having to adjust my workouts to try different things that should hopefully work.

              Comment


                #8
                SamFlynn82 you've been given some great advice here. I will add a little more in-depth material for everyone in the thread and, as it happens, we have a detailed piece on protein ingestion and muscle building that should be up in our nutrition section tomorrow or the day after. I will, time permitting, bring it into the thread but keep an eye out for it.

                Bulking up is dependent upon four specific factors:

                - Training
                - Diet
                - Lifestyle
                - Genetics

                In theory you control three of the four, but this is not always the case in practice. Generally, to bulk up, you need to do the right kind of training, have the right kind of diet in terms of protein ingestion (and the subject is not as simple as it sounds), reduce stress in your life and have the kind of genetics that provide satellite cell density that allows rapid muscle fiber response to resistance exercises that leads to protein synthesis (which is what muscle is), As you gather from all this it is different for each person.

                What I would suggest is to experiment keeping track of all the variables either in a diary or on a thread here. If, for example, you decide to increase your protein intake (and in your case you need about 1.6g/kg body weight/ day interspersed throughout all the meals you have in a day) record what exercises you are doing and try to get plenty of sleep and manage stress as much as you can. By the sound of it your genes may not be completely on your side here but that only means it will take a little longer to build muscle than it does for other people.

                Let us know how you're doing and I hope this has helped a little.

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                  #9
                  It's probably a stupid question. If you eat the same you won't be bulking or increasing any size, no matter how much workout you do, right?

                  Sorry for hijacking.

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                    #10
                    I am wondering what your training and food regime looks like? I suggest to start logging daily/weekly under the "Check in" section. When you have reached some consistency you have insights for yourself and others to help you with your specific goals.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by kandy View Post
                      It's probably a stupid question. If you eat the same you won't be bulking or increasing any size, no matter how much workout you do, right?

                      Sorry for hijacking.
                      No, this is exactly what I wanted

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                        #12
                        SamFlynn82 you may also want to now take a look at our in-depth article on protein and muscle building.

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                          #13
                          Gotta eat big and lift big to get big. Like everyone is saying, tracking your intake is a must. I recommend the MyFitnessPal because it has a database of foods to pick from. As long as you put in the realistic amounts of food you consume, it will tell you honestly how much you eat. Lifting big means the big 5 compound barbell lifts: bench press, overhead press, deadlift, rows, and squats. Good luck.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Damer View Post
                            SamFlynn82 you may also want to now take a look at our in-depth article on protein and muscle building.
                            Hadn't seen this before and it's awesome; thanks!

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Damer, reading through your new article, I have one huge question: What kind of Kefir do you drink that it has 22% protein? Every Kefir I can buy (and the average percentage of homemade kefir) gives me around the same percentage as milk, which is ~3,5%. Is this an error or do you have some kind of turbo-kefir? Seriously interested

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