Low impact version of jump squats, jumping lunges, and burpees?

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    Low impact version of jump squats, jumping lunges, and burpees?

    Title says it. I am not very confident about doing those exercises with my knee condition. For jump squats and jumping lunges, I am thinking about getting up from the squat/ lunge before jumping. What do you think?

    But how about burpees? I can't think of any good subsititution for the part when you thrust your legs back and then in.

    #2
    HI kandy , just my two-cents: My knees are a bit worn (I do not have a diagnosed condition, but going downhill on a hike for some time usually results in some stinging knee pain. Going up is ok.). I rather worry about the impact of the' landing' and not the 'take-off' part of the jump, therefore I train on a martial-arts style mat (2cm) and with shoes. So I rather skip the jump in burpee (as much as I would like to skip the whole damn burpee). The thrusting back I see as rather low-impact in comparison to the jump. When trusting back in, I do not tuck my legs in completly, (no 'Ass to the Grass', that also has resulted in some pain once), so I have to lean back a bit to get up.
    All the best
    Andi

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      #3
      I do the same low impact exercise: jump squats> squats, jumping lunges> lunges, etc. increasing the repetitions, to be picky you can add calf raises to make your calves work more
      My reasoning is simple: they work the same muscles and there are no unwanted side effects in the long distance.
      I can make the versions with the jump but it is not a version that I can always do and this already makes me think about how well I can do that type of training too often and how much it is worth.
      I give a concrete example: if I do 100 burpee with jump and push-up the next day my knees hurt, if I take off the jump the next day I don't have collateral pains, so I take off the jump

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        #4
        For a low impact burpee, just step your legs back to the plank position one at a time, and back in, then raise up from your squat, and do a little jump if you want or leave that off.
        For jumping lunges, what I did to start those in a modification was to just lightly jump my feet out about a foot (half a meter?) apart from each other, “toward” the lunging position. Then, switch them with a little jump. Helps to build confidence with very little impact. Basically, like a standing flutter kick in its form and style.
        For the jump squats, you’re right: just stand back up and do a little jump, barely off the floor.

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          #5
          As another modification of jump squats and if it feels ok for your knees, you could also try staying in a squat and do small hops (squat hop/hop squat) - basically, your knees and hips stay pretty much in the same position when you jump. You can try it first from a half squat and go lower as you progress or, when you feel comfortable, start from half squat and fully extend your legs as you jump. All these mods combined will give you a good base to start working on the jump squat when your knees feel better.

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            #6
            Thank you everyone! Your responses are very helpful.

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              #7
              Originally posted by Andi64 View Post
              I rather worry about the impact of the' landing' and not the 'take-off' part of the jump, therefore I train on a martial-arts style mat (2cm) and with shoes.
              I have been wondering about the same thing. What is more impacting to the knees, a 90 degree squat or a jumping jack, the jump or the landing? And how about runnning?

              Now that I think about it. I can actually try doing a regular jump squat. When I trained with my physio, he made me do forward single-leg jumping. I was told to bend my knee before the jump, and, upon landing, smoothly transition from straight knee to bent knee. Landing with a bent knee allowed the quad to absorb the impact, and the landing would be more quiet, too. If you go straight up and down you will be banging against the ground, which is bad for the knee. So high knee can be more harmful because you mostly land with your knee straight. And it's true that I have problem with high knees. I can't do many reps. Maybe less than a hundred is fine.

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