Knee Miscellaneous

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  • photon
    replied
    On the last day of my holiday in July I was carrying a heavy suitcase downstairs . After I made a weird side move I felt pain in front of my kneekap. The pain is still there, but I can sport with it. I am not an expert but it helps me to do light exercises with a lot of repetitions. If you have a serious injury consult a physo therapist, perhaps repeat the exercies you did before. If you can't do squads try half squads and balance out with hip stretches.

    The exercises I am doing:

    Home Exercise Program For Knee Conditioning {3 TIMES A WEEK FOR 6-8 WEEKS} (Non Darbee)

    For some variation: Recovery Knee Conditioning Program (Non Darebee)

    Hamstring Stretch Workout (Darbee)

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  • kandy
    replied
    Damer Thank you agian!

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  • Damer
    replied
    kandy no worries and feeling twinges on the good knee is common when you have an injured one. The body compensates the load without you being aware of it and the result is a little sympathetic pain on the other knee. You should be able to do Foundation Level III on most days. Take your time during execution, focus on form so you're not rushing anything and on the few occasions when it gets too much just scale it down to Level II.

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  • kandy
    replied
    Damer Thank you for your response and being nice. I guess I just need someone to assure me and tell me if it's fine (or not,) because I am not an expert and I am not secured.

    And yes when I did exercises for rehab I experienced some pain, and my physio just adjusted the intensity and volume but we kept going. But then sometimes I doubted if I should keep trusting him.

    P.S. I forgot to mention that recently the other knee (the good one) sometimes experienced pain similar to the injured side after exercising, but the "fine" knee was more resistant. Sometimes it makes me wonder if it's injured as well even though it's obviously a better knee.

    Aaaand what do you think if I am able to do most of the Foundation days at lvl3, a lot of times with 1 minute rest?

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  • Damer
    replied
    kandy good questions. Every injury has the same effect: it de-strengthens muscles and tendons. That loss of strength is what is key in the rehabilitation period where the injury itself has healed but the joint is not yet back to where it should be. A knee brace is a crutch. Just like a crutch it affects how you use your knee and how you feel about using it. A knee brace is great if you repeatedly injury your knee so you're using for preventative purposes or you need a little extra support on a day when you know in advance you will be doing extra load on the knee (climbing steps, carrying things, walking a lot more than usual etc). but really, if the injury has healed, you shouldn't be using it and you should, instead, focus on getting your knee back to where it should be with strengthening work and conditioning done gradually and persistently.

    The reason your knee didn't hurt before is because it was strong and it had arrived at that point of strength gradually and you were on a path where everything you did was a logical, linear progression. The injury sustained by the knee joint is a setback in a literal sense. The strength of your knee is not what it was. It has reverted back to a less able time. If you could go back in time and clearly remember how it felt when you were training your knee back then I bet there will be an amount of discomfort involved. Be patient. Be careful. Be consistent.

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  • kandy
    replied
    Originally posted by Damer View Post
    At the same time a knee joint can easily get overloaded and injured (because of its importance and central role) so it is always good to sort of monitor every feedback you get rather than just dismiss it. I hope this makes sense.
    I may be falling into the loop, but the thing that puzzles me is that before the injury even if I did heavy tendon workout, or other strength/cardio exercises, I seldom felt pain in the knee, but now it's pretty easy to get pain. Does it mean the injury is still there, or the knee structure has been altered by the injury? Thanks!

    Can knee brace be deceptive? Say I wear it for a month doing cardio like high knees and jumping jacks and my knee feels completely fine, but it feels bad again once I take the brace off. Can this happen? How about if I do strength and not cardio?

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  • Damer
    replied
    kandy the simplest answer here is yes. The knee is the junction point where the strength and fitness of all the muscles and tendons come together and become effective, which is why it is so important. At the same time a knee joint can easily get overloaded and injured (because of its importance and central role) so it is always good to sort of monitor every feedback you get rather than just dismiss it. I hope this makes sense.

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  • kandy
    replied
    Originally posted by Damer View Post
    First of all the easy answers however: Calf raises might make your knees ache but not hurt. ... All of these must be strengthened in a balanced way for a healthy knee. Ache is a byproduct of the strengthening process as we get 'there'.
    Just want to make sure: does it apply to other muscles of the legs? For example if I squat or do tendons workout and feel some knee pain, is it still the same kind of "strengthening process"?

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  • kandy
    replied
    Damer Thank you so much! It's very helpful.

    Knee pain is so complex, and sometimes I wonder if it's actually a good thing instead of always a sign of injury.

    I secretly think that I can take on all the high intensity stuff after wearing a brace.

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  • Damer
    replied
    kandy no bother at all and this is something that requires some explanation.

    First of all the easy answers however: Calf raises might make your knees ache but not hurt. The knee joint itself is one of the more complex joints in the body (the shoulder joint has top honors on this). From a mechanical point of view it is basically a concave and convex areas joined in a fluid filled environment with the joint held together by a criss-crossing of tendons and ligaments. Because ligaments are by definition strong, strengthening the knee joint means strengthening the muscles around it that lead to the ligaments: calves, quads, achilles heel tendon. All of these must be strengthened in a balanced way for a healthy knee. Ache is a byproduct of the strengthening process as we get 'there'.

    Now for the brace or not to brace question: The idea that a few swathes of fabric, a piece of tape or a neoprene bandage can seriously support a knee that can take up to 600 pounds of pressure is illogical. A 2010 study that used American football players failed to provide a definitive answer. The study found that wearing a knee brace sometimes helps prevent injury and at other times causes it. Older studies that focus on ACL recovery and re-injury rates have found that wearing a brace actually helps reduce the chances of re-injury. Another study, carried out in 2009, ruled with some caution that knee braces, when properly fitted, could help prevent injuries.

    Lacking any decisive study here I am going on a limb with inference. I think a knee brace, at times, makes the wearer conscious of the knee joint and therefore more careful and -in addition- it restricts some degree of movement. These two in combination could account for the reduction in reported re-injuries.

    By the same token a knee brace can make the wearer feel that they are somehow 'protected' and therefore no longer have to be careful, hence the re-injury rates reported by the study.

    My personal inclination here is to say by all means do wear a knee brace. It will help keep the joint warm when you exercise plus it will make you more conscious of the movement of the joint itself which is not a bad thing. Do not assume you can take more liberties with your knee just because you're wearing a brace however. I really hope this has helped.

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  • kandy
    replied
    Back again:

    What do you think about wearing a knee brace when I do darebee workout? The idea is to do so until I feel like my legs and hips become really strong from various training. Then I will take it off.
    Also, can doing calf raises hurt your knees?

    Thanks in advance!

    Damer I am sorry to bother you but I just have to tag you.

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  • kandy
    replied
    DorothyMH Thank you for your kind words.

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  • DorothyMH
    replied
    I can testify as to the truth of Damer statement. Every single time I am away traveling as I have aged (I am now 56+), the amount of fitness lost is shocking. It’s nice to see the numbers, Damer! I think exercising in my sleep MAY be an answer! 😝😤
    Slow and steady, kandy, you are on the right path forward. Knee injuries suck so bad, but I am impressed with your fortitude. Just don’t rush it. Use ice after working the knee and elevate it and rest often.

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  • kandy
    replied
    Damer Thank you! It's one of the best things I have heard!

    I know strength loses pretty quick but the speed of loss still makes me question it.

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  • Damer
    replied
    kandy every injury incurs a period of de-strengthening, when the muscles, tendons and ligaments use their old ability because they are inactive as the injury heals. To get back to the original level of fitness requires re-strengthening and that needs a structured protocol where, usually, you go through the full range of motion but under a lighter load or slower. Usually pain is the complaint of muscles needing to adapt to get stronger. So, in answer to your question, yes you can get back to your original fitness but you need to be patient, persistent and careful. We always lose strength faster than we acquire it. I came across a study a few months back that showed that after 35 a two-week holiday break can result in as much as 45% loss of strength and fitness and then that requires between 4 - 5 months to return to what it used to be before the holiday break. Sometimes I consider the wisdom of finding ways to exercise as I sleep.

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