Body weight exercises and bone density.

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    Body weight exercises and bone density.

    Hey, so for me, one of the main benefits of strength training with weights was knowing it is helping keep my bones strong. Due to the newly diangosed spine arthritis, I can't lift like I want to. I am planning on switching to mostly body weight exercises, but am curious if things like squats, push ups and "w extensions" are also good for bone density?

    p.s. I did try google first, but weights just kept popping up, and you guys are pros, so yanno, thought I'd just ask!

    #2
    drp ... any movement you do will help.
    ALL your bones, the ones affected more than the others, but all will benefit.
    Sure, the heavier your workout, the greater the benefit. But I understand that the first few minutes after getting out of bed have the most effect, it's 'downhill' from there.
    Don't mistake me, you get more benefit the more you do, just on a sliding scale.

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      #3
      DaithiMeyer, so the earlier the better...for bones or all over fitness in general? I try to exercise as early as possible, but I am the most stiff/in pain after sleeping and I need 30-60 min to get to kinda-normal.

      And thanks for your reply!

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        #4
        Maybe you want to try the Morning Stretch workout first thing in the morning, then, drp ? Thanks to my old mattress I always wake up feeling like I hit a truck at night, but the stretching routine works wonders for me.
        And regarding the perfect time to workout: I haven't found anything about workouts having greater effect the earlier you do them (I am greatly interested in reading more about that, though), but there are quite a lot of articles floating around on the web about morning vs. evening workouts and which one is better (bottom-line: it depends)

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          #5
          Thank you Nihopaloa, the morning stretch sounds good! I can do it when I get up for my coffee (tho i might just do the hammy stretch before i get up, since i can't hinge at my hips)

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            #6
            Don't overlook the importance of diet here. Resistance training is great (whether free weight or bodyweight), but you need to make sure you're getting enough calcium and other minerals, otherwise it won't matter how much you lift.

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              #7
              drp ... I think you mistook my comment. If you are going to do 100 punches, it is that first punch that gives you the highest 'value', the 100th the least.
              In terms of injury/damage, it is the opposite. The first punch is least likely to bring about pain, the last the most.
              But ... yes. Get in some stretching, Tai Chi, Qi Gong, Yoga early in on to prep your body for the rest of your day.

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                #8
                DaithiMeyer ...oh okay! That makes more sense. Thank you for clarifying.

                Baston - I don't take supplements (other than b12 and D in the winter), but I'm a strict veggie and so I track my supplements frequently in cronometer to make sure I'm not falling sort anywhere - most days I make it just fine. I eat a pretty varied, nutrient rich diet. But still wanting the extra bone boost

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by DaithiMeyer View Post
                  drp ... I think you mistook my comment. If you are going to do 100 punches, it is that first punch that gives you the highest 'value', the 100th the least.
                  I really don't know where you got this from and I would highly question the correctness of this statement. If that were true why would anyone do anything beyond the first few reps, as these are supposed to deliver the highest quality?

                  If anything it's the last few reps that make the difference. Your body (muscles, tendons, bones, lung capacity, etc...) will only see the need to improve when it gets to its limit - which is when you get to the last few reps. And even that's a very generalized statement.

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                    #10
                    As far as I know, for healthy people, the best exercise for maintaining or increasing bone density are plyometrics (basically any kind of activity where you become airborne: running, jumping, skipping rope...). However, these exercises are high-impact and carry risks of their own (stress fractures, injury...) and given OP's spinal arthritis, this is probably not a good idea. I would recommend you get information on the types of exercises you can do from a doctor or a PT because they will depend on the location of arthritis (cervical, thoracic, lumbar spine), the presence of osteophytes, progression of the disease etc. Generally, swimming/water aerobics, walking and other low-impact exercises are advised. Also, don't work out when you're feeling stiff (in the morning after waking up) but when you are most at ease.

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                      #11
                      What will increase your bone density is loading the bones, through resistance exercise (weight, etc.) or impact (stepping, etc.). Since you are a member of a clinical population right now, you really need to get specifics from your physician, physical therapist, and occupational therapist, because it also depends on your age, hormonal status, etc.

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