Barefoot or not for home run exercises

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    Barefoot or not for home run exercises

    I'm doing Cardio Go program now, but question applies to all similar in-house run substitutions. How safe it is to do these exercises barefoot?
    And what if you have flat feet?

    Yesterday during march steps I felt at first a great deal of strain in right leg's inner lower side (not sure which tendon/muscle it is). After some sets it got better, but still, I had to be cautious. Also, there was a bit of strain in toes, like I was trying to "hold the floor" with them.
    So I'm not sure, are these strains normal for a beginner or I'd better wear trainers?

    #2
    You have to modify to do what is best for you. If you want to do this barefoot, that's up to you, but I would encourage you to be safe and make sure you aren't going to hurt yourself. I am fortunate in that I have a workout room in my home that I put interlocking floor padding in, with a fluffy carpet on top. Other than that, I wouldn't recommend doing any high impact exercises barefoot. Yoga, on the other hand, I traditionally good for bare feet, as well as any exercise on the beach.

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      #3
      Do you train on carpet or on parquet/laminate floor? I usually train barefoot (without any socks) on laminate. I think it's perfectly fine, but during some exercises that generate high friction on the floor, like climbers or maybe high knees, I can get blisters. That's when I wear gymnastic shoes. In my case it's to prevent the friction, but I haven't found myself "grabbing" the floor with my toes yet. Do you usually walk around indoors with shoes or bare feet?

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        #4
        aviskase ... the biggest threat to your feet doing March Steps barefoot might be if your housekeeping is too much like mine.

        Younger women tend to do better than older men, at that. Their Moms might come to visit.
        But, it sounds like that isn't your problem. I'd suggest that, for March Steps, you continue barefoot.
        High Knees are a different story. Friction and impact both suggest wearing impact-absorbing sneakers - if you are having problems.
        Enjoy.

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          #5
          Nihopaloa DaithiMeyer I don't understand how you can generate too much friction doing high knees barefoot since there is very little contact time between the feet and the floor.

          Anyway, I do almost all the Darebee exercises barefoot. When I need extra protection, I wear sneakers or ballerina shoes. My floor is padded with floor mats, too. And the extra protection is because I like comfort, physical and mental, and because I have bilateral bipartite sesamoid bones in my feet and that complicates a lot of things like mountain climbers.

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            #6
            Originally posted by dynamomelano View Post
            Nihopaloa DaithiMeyer I don't understand how you can generate too much friction doing high knees barefoot since there is very little contact time between the feet and the floor.
            I generate too much friction when I skid too much during the contact with the floor (might not be the best form, tbh). Climbers are worse in that regard.

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              #7
              Originally posted by dynamomelano View Post
              Nihopaloa DaithiMeyer I don't understand how you can generate too much friction doing high knees barefoot since there is very little contact time between the feet and the floor.
              Anyway, I do almost all the Darebee exercises barefoot. When I need extra protection, I wear sneakers or ballerina shoes. My floor is padded with floor mats, too. And the extra protection is because I like comfort, physical and mental, and because I have bilateral bipartite sesamoid bones in my feet and that complicates a lot of things like mountain climbers.
              The rapid movements cause slight skidding along a hard-surface floor. March Steps are slow enough to avoid such and a rug can also protect you. If you are used to walking/running barefoot, you may have developed calluses. I'm guessing these conditions do not exist for her. Else the discomfort she felt would not have been noticed.

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                #8
                I do martial arts and we train barefoot there, so I do all of my Darebee workouts barefoot too. However due to my extensive research consisting of 45 seconds of Google folks with flat feet might have their feet naturally roll towards the inside which isn't necessarily normal. Maybe try both barefoot and with shoes and see what feels best? / Do you have a podiatrist or physical therapist you could ask?

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                  #9
                  aviskase i'd recommend seeing exploring whether or not you have plantar fasciitis. the sensation of feeling like you are grabbing the floor with your toes might be because the fascia are tight. i learned what it is when the PT was trying to work them out in my foot. best-worst pain ever. if you or your partner massage your feet and it feels like you have little beads sort of randomly placed across the bottom of your foot and it hurts a lot to press on the little beads, you might have plantar fasciitis.

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                    #10
                    Do you have a podiatrist or physical therapist you could ask?
                    _unmother , being recent immigrant I'm not that comfortable with Quebec health system (waaaaay too complicated), so I avoid dealing with it without urgent need (bad mindset, yeah).



                    Yup, as everyone mentioned, surface matters, I didn't think about it. It's a plain parquet. So far, no complains from the student who lives downstairs . I have a yoga mat, but it's too "slide-y" for semi-running exercises. And even with something more steady I'd still feel uneasy and will clench toes way more, that's for sure.

                    I do prefer walking barefoot whenever I can, because all socks and shoes have this tendency to get narrow whereas it feels better to have toes a bit apart, "loose". So, I see two options here:
                    1) continue as is, if it's really just a matter of getting a habit
                    2) buy some trainers (kinda pain to find something fitting without spending a fortune)



                    BTW, there is no problem doing high knees, because feet land differently, more like during running. Even with running shoes I always tend to run somewhat like barefoot, heel stroke feels completely unnatural. Don't know, if it's short term "no problem" with long term "oops", I mean, I've just started exercising, so what feels ok now can be wrong ))

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by aviskase View Post
                      Also, there was a bit of strain in toes, like I was trying to "hold the floor" with them.
                      So I'm not sure, are these strains normal for a beginner or I'd better wear trainers?
                      I don't think this is necessarily bad. The toes of a bare foot will usually spread and grab the floor to get ready for the push-off (remember people's attempt to recreate this with "barefoot" shoes and socks?). But my guess is that if you are not used to be barefoot under stress (exercise), then it will feel weird and tiring. Maybe, in the absence of injury, you might just need to give it time and get used to it.

                      Maybe landing like when one jumps rope (flatter) instead of having the foot in the shape of a foot inside a high heel shoe (too pointed) will lessen the discomfort.

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                        #12
                        Originally posted by dynamomelano View Post

                        Maybe landing like when one jumps rope (flatter) instead of having the foot in the shape of a foot inside a high heel shoe (too pointed) will lessen the discomfort.
                        I used your advice yesterday when I started to feel a slight pain in the top of right foot, and it definitely helped. Thanks!

                        Today I've borrowed a pair of walking sneakers and used them for exercising (because right foot was still sore), and holy macaroni, it was 10 times easier than barefoot! What I don't like is that it's also too hot, but maybe with proper trainers it won't be such a problem. So yeah, I will try to buy some trainers for a bit of protection, but without much cushioning (I prefer not to over-support and further weaken those non-existing arches).

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                          #13
                          Originally posted by aviskase View Post
                          I used your advice yesterday when I started to feel a slight pain in the top of right foot, and it definitely helped. Thanks!

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                            #14
                            I tend to work out barefoot, but for the high-impact cardio (jumping jacks, high knees, etc) I use my little trampoline. Sometimes I do it barefoot, sometimes I throw my shoes on, depends on how I feel that day. That being said, I already owned the trampoline, but if you've got one hanging around, it might be worth a try?

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                              #15
                              Foxeh , no, I don't have a trampoline, nevertheless, thanks for suggestion, it may give an idea for other bees

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