High Impact exercise causing ankle and shin pain?

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    High Impact exercise causing ankle and shin pain?

    I've been doing boxing week, and between all the jumping, high knees, sprints, and 5km runs my ankles and shins are getting extremely painful. What can I do to mitigate the discomfort, or should I expect it to go away on its own?

    ETA: I forgot to mention, but originally I thought the problem was that I was doing exercises in my running shoes (yesterday high knees became much less painful when i did them barefoot instead), but today I wore a pair of separate tennis shoes and the pain came back in force.

    #2
    Firstly I'd like to say that I'd recommend you do the exercises barefoot whenever you can, because that's awesome extra exercise for your tendons and supporting muscles, plus it's closer to the "natural" way of movement, so the risk of injury is lessened.

    But concerning your pain there are two possibilities.

    One would be that you've overworked your tendons and joints, meaning they're inflamed and need rest. Is this what shin splints are?

    The second would be like what happens to me everytime I restart the Makeover challenge or anything with high reps of high knees: My tendons and supporting foot muscles are not yet trained so they have something similar to DOMS, which requires a little rest, but just going forth with the exercises in the plan will, over time, see this getting better.

    Unfortunately I have no way of telling those two apart, because I've never had the former (I'm too lazy to overwork myself).

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      #3
      I'd recommend taking some vitamin C like 10 grams a day spaced out through the day. This will decrease any inflammation and help recovery. I can vouch for this myself I have been taking it for the past 8 months and it has done wonders for joint pain and I don't get DOMS like ever. I do lots of tendon strength based training such as Grip and Bending Steel so trust me I know what tendon pain and DOMs feels like Also, our bodies love vitamin C . Its Also, cheap, affordable, and safe. Any question feel free to ask Good Luck!!

      Comment


        #4
        There is no evidence for high doses of vitamin C having any effect besides causing digestion problems and kidney stones.

        Linus Pauling went crazy in his later years and since he was already famouns by that point the serious scientists had no way of counteracting his public insanity.

        Comment


          #5
          Thanks for your advice!! I'm definitely going to do more barefoot work (the effect of lessening pain was immediate). I'll pay attention and see if my body's adjusting or getting hurt, then plan from there.

          Comment


            #6
            Noen That simply just not True ...There are many that have had success with Vitamin C at high doses other than Pauling .....The statement you made is rather swallow and has no backing just slander to be frank... Don't bash it If you have not read the literature or done your due diligence. Vitamin C does not cause kidney stones it actually prevents them. However that not what this thread is about so I would say let those who would actually do there due diligence on the subject rather than blindly assuming decide for themselves. I Have not had anything but positive results from Vitamin C. I personally have just cured my whole family which tested positive for the flu with High dose Vitamin C the proof is in the pudding one would not know unless they taste it.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by NO Face View Post
              Don't bash it If you have not read the literature or done your due diligence.
              I'd ask the same of you. I don't study pharmacy for a title, I study it for knowledge. And whaddaya know, it turns out vitamin C can't cure the flu and causes kidney stones. The literature is incredibly clear on this. In fact the manufacturer of that vit C supplement for teachers was legally required to stop claiming it can cure the cold or flu on their packaging, because no study has ever shown that, ever.

              Fun fact: Testing positive for the flu doesn't mean you get a full flu. If one has had that particular strain or a similar one before, then it often just produces three days of mild illness, no symptoms at all or something akin to a cold.

              At this point I have to assume that by "literature" you mean "links from websites that want to sell me vitamin C that pretend to be scientific".

              I'm an avid reader so, by all means, send me the studies and I'll read them.

              Comment


                #8
                Noen Actually, My kids and family are not vaccinated and actually they had the Flu. That said I have nothing to prove. As I said before the proof is in the pudding.. Taste it ...My father has Pancreatic Cancer just one day of I.V. vitamin C had him up and active and eating also not asking for pain meds ...Days before he was bed bound and starving himself in also in lots of pain.. If it don't work Why have so many been successful with it and cancer clinics use it Hummm https://riordanclinic.org/what-we-do...-iv-vitamin-c/ ...

                I would check to see who funded the science you read.. The literature I read is not trying to sell me anything or anyone else. They actually don't affiliate or recommend anything for that very reason of conflict
                I know what the Flu looks like I see many kids with it often especially this time of year. False positives are a valid point but more often than not if you test positive your are positive.

                Anyways http://www.orthomolecular.org/resour...ns/index.shtml Here is lots Here is more http://www.doctoryourself.com/ Here is much much more http://orthomolecular.org/library/jom/index.shtml

                [FONT=Arial,Helvetica][SIZE=-1]The carpenter desires timber, the physician disease.[/SIZE][/FONT]
                [FONT=Arial,Helvetica][SIZE=-1]Rig Veda IX. 7.9[/SIZE][/FONT]

                Comment


                  #9
                  NO Face Im sorry, I dont know much about the subject, but those links seem fishy to say the least. After a quick visit:

                  -Doctor yourself is literaly a selling web for Saul's books in which most of the references goes to orthomolecular.org

                  -Orthomolecular seem less fishy at first, but a portion of the references from the articles they write goes to newspapers articles, other portion loop back to doctor yourself and the trustworthy part reference to some studies that cant really conclude that vitamin C is causing the improvement. Some say that a balance intake is good (which is basically a healthy diet), some see a relationship between intake and improvement in different areas and some others dont. The lesson I take is that it does seems kind promising but nothing has been settled and there is no definitive conclusion as the results are in conflict.

                  So as an uninformed individual I can say:
                  Anecdotal evidence has not much value because under this circunstances correlation in events doesnt imply causation.
                  There doents seem to be a consensus on the topic and I can say those webs make it look too good to be true (so it probably isnt, at least not to the degree that they imply).

                  All in all, Im happy that it worked for you, but I wouldnt put my money on it unless a doctor prescribed it to me.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Ice You are correct In the all Saul sells is books. Gotta make a living.. Yes, Most links go to orthomolecular.org don't see why that is fishy. To be honest I believe you should read more before deciding I read for awhile before I was convinced and I really wasn't until I gave it a honest non bias try. Your skepticism is understood but, when you look at the chemistry its self evident and kind of intuitive. I wouldn't say all of it is anecdotal there is empirical evidence specifically when one looks at how our bodies use nutrients. Most all Doctors linked only used Vitamins in treatments. How then is it not clear that they are the cause of improvement. Also, There is much literature in the link I provided there is no way one could come to a conclusion in such a short time frame or have done any real comparison. I also fail to see were results are in conflict if you could elaborate a bit.

                    Also, most studies suggesting Vitamin does not work use insufficient doses and are not very empirical at all. Also, most that publish such studies are highly affiliated with Pharmaceutical industry..

                    Trust me I done me homework before exposing myself and my loved ones or recommending it to any one. I just find it rather amusing that those who have done little reading and have possibly no experience with it are so quick to bash it and patronize.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      It seems to me that you can reap the benefits of vitamin C from a healthy diet, so I dont see the need for suplementation. There are some claims that say that you just pee the exces.
                      I meant conflict as in papers finding differents results (or the absent of them) and the extend. I think that it seems like a weirdly controversial topic so its better to focus in other things like plain diet and exercise (or in this case barefoot exercise) hence I remain skeptical and I wouldnt use it for ankle and shin pain.

                      So... optimvsprinceps sorry for the intrusion. I hope that working out barefoot do the trick.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Ice already put a point to it, so I will quote myself:

                        Originally posted by Noen View Post
                        At this point I have to assume that by "literature" you mean "links from websites that want to sell me vitamin C that pretend to be scientific".
                        Though I'm impressed you managed to not only find people who want to sell you the actual supplement, but also books about the supplement.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          There should never be pain when working out. Muscle soreness can happen from working out hard, but pain is different from being sore. I recommend always wearing shoes when working out whether you are running or doing high knees or any other high impact exercise. I find shoes help me push harder and land solidly on my feet.

                          However, you need to ask yourself some questions.... How long have you been doing this kind of functional fitness? You can't just go to "hero" mode over night. The body needs time to adapt to intense movements. Give yourself time and patience. Are you warming up? Do you stretch after a workout? Do you own a stick to message your muscles before a workout? Do you foam role? I would not be able to do the intense high impact stuff I do without the stick. It is called "the stick" and a google search will help with finding out what it is further.

                          All in all, pain should never be a thing. Give yourself time. Be consistent. Time will not help if you only workout once a week. And, I read in one of the articles on Darebee that functional fitness is like running, it takes time. So give yourself the time and the patience to get into. I have been doing this stuff for 18 months now, and am only now noticing the benefits of being able to do things better.

                          Have fun training.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by optimvsprinceps View Post
                            I've been doing boxing week, and between all the jumping, high knees, sprints, and 5km runs my ankles and shins are getting extremely painful. What can I do to mitigate the discomfort, or should I expect it to go away on its own?

                            ETA: I forgot to mention, but originally I thought the problem was that I was doing exercises in my running shoes (yesterday high knees became much less painful when i did them barefoot instead), but today I wore a pair of separate tennis shoes and the pain came back in force.
                            The issue with your ankles and shins is likely too much too soon. You've increased your exercise load to a point where your body can't keep up and it's starting to affect the ankles and shins. FItness doesn't improve during an exercise session, it improves during the recovery phase. In between your 5ks, jump, high knees etc, remember to scatter in some recovery. This is true regardless of your fitness level but is more important if these exercises are new to you.

                            Get 7-9 hours of sleep. Eat balanced meals. Engage in active recovery.

                            Here are a few resources provided by Darebee that go into more depth:
                            Rest, Recovery and Overtraining
                            How to Listen to Your Body

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Ice
                              No worries, I'm not bothered by the discussion in the slightest! It can be hard sometimes to separate fact from fiction, especially in a community like this where many people have been pursuing fitness for a long time and may know lots of contradictory information. I really appreciate the fact that I got to see some discourse like this.

                              KalePower
                              I really had to go back and look at my warmup and recovery habits, yeah. They have foam rollers at my campus gym and I've started both working more dynamic stretches into my warmup routine and using rollers after runs especially. I've been doing fitness things kind of on and off for a long time, but didn't start working out every day until about a month ago when I started Power Cardio, and then jumped from doing that once a day to doing Boxing Week, which has a bunch of high impact exercise combined with running most days.

                              I think, as Blair put it, it was too much too soon— not only was I not warming up sufficiently (lots of times the first set of whatever I was doing ended up warming me up better than the actual warm up), I wasn't giving my legs the TLC they needed to recover. I'm definitely eating and sleeping well, though, and I'll put more time into caring for my body outside of the intense work.

                              Thanks, everyone!

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