Kicks

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    Kicks

    Damer
    I have much difficulties with side kicks, turning kicks, and hook kicks, the 3 types of kicks that I have tried and encountered significant difficulties so far, especially when I am executing them with my left leg.

    One huge problem is with my joints, I think. My knee joint feels like locked, or something is inside it that stops my leg from kicking fully, so when I do side kicks and turning kicks my leg never gets straight, with the knee always bending. My hip joint also feels locked, so I can never kick high when doing side kick, not even 90 degrees. The leg simply stays there after raising up to a certain point. Hook kick is disaster as my torso always leans/ bends to the opposite side when I try to do the hook kick backward, and my body feels very stiff.

    These are situations with both legs. The left side was like total disaster, and my right seems to be much better at it. At least I can do the turning and hook kicking motion, though not very great (leg not fully extended in turning kicks and hip joint can feel a bit locked during the hooks), but when it comes to side kick my right leg seems to have all the problems from the previous paragraph.

    Also, with both kicking legs I can't hold them any long in the air. It's like I can't wait but put them down as long as I finish kicking, or not even finishing.

    My third problem is with my standing stability during these kicks. I am much more stable while standing with my left leg than with my right. Does it mean my left side is stronger, and which area? Or it's actually my right side at work while standing with my left?

    What's happening with all these and what should I do?
    Thanks in advance!

    #2
    Urg I posted in the wrong area.

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      #3
      kandy Moved to the right section

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        #4
        kandy I have had to overcome these exact problems at tae kwon do whilst all people vary I'd like to think i can offer some advice, ALOT of the problems i face is to do with my hamstrings so stretching those every other day will be a huge help, it is giving me the ability to lock out that knee a lot easier now i'm keeping them stretched.

        Another thing you must do is warm your legs up jog on the spot, high knees whatever works for you, open up your hips with an opening the gate type move (not sure of name) basically bring the knee to waist and push it out to your side like opening a gate.

        I personally like an excercise that i feel helps my kicks where I hold a squat position for 15 seconds or so drive up and through the hips squeezing the glutes whilst raising my arms finished with bending to touch my toes.

        One last thing i'd suggest is trying your foot at different angles when kicking, i had a sharp pinch type pain when trying turning kick on my right side only and putting my foot at a 90 degree angle almost instantly stopped it, don't kick above waist height for now work on stretching and technique.

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          #5
          Hi! I really like the suggestions by UKmanUK12 and have one in addition, which might help with issues 2 and 3 (the holding up and the stability). You can try to execute the kicks as slowly as possible, like maybe count to ten during one kick. You will not be able to kick very high (a lot of that is momentum), and you may need to hold on to some furniture in the beginning, but you'll build up stability and strength with minimum risk of injury by jerking something in a direction it doesn't want to go. You will also probably gain a better understanding of where you need more strength or flexibility.

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            #6
            Thanks a lot! UKmanUK12 MissSmilla
            These make sense to me.

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              #7
              kandy you've had some good suggestions here. The problems you encounter are common when it comes to kicks. A kick is a typically complex action with many segments to it but some of the most obvious ones are: flexibility (hamstrings for front leg kicks and turning kicks and adductors for side kicks), tendon strength (the front hip flexors for front kicks and turning kicks and the side hip flexors for side kicks) and core stability (for maintaining body balance). In addition the angle of your standing foot, when you execute the kick is key. We have a detailed Guide to Kicks with diagrams and videos. Notice, in particular how the position of the standing foot changes as each kick is executed. These are done both in slow motion and normal speed to help you get an idea. There is also this section and as you can see it shows a low turning kick amongst others. In the beginning it is always a good idea to not go too high with your kicks until you get a feel for the technique. As with everything it is a case of doing them slowly and building up your skillset. Kicks are hard to do but I will say persevere. Once you can do them they turn you into a total badass type of person. I hope this helps.

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                #8
                Damer to the rescue again!

                UKmanUK12 and MissSmilla have pretty much covered it and helped me in the process. I really need to work on my flexibility and am getting physiotherapy on my hamstrings and lower back currently. Hopefully this will be the start of better things to come...

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                  #9
                  Martyn that sounds like quite a process! Wishing you a speedy recovery!

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                    #10
                    Martyn I am really glad this helped. It sounds like you have your hands full this year. Everything is a process. Small steps applied persistently and consistently. Here's to a full recovery, fast.

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