A question to the runners

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    A question to the runners

    Hello all, I've always had appalling stamina and endurance so i decided the first step of my journey would be a running program, I'm using the walk to run workout here and on day 3 today i really struggled 2 minutes running made me feel like i was gasping for air.

    I do taekwondo twice a week and i am the least fit there, the warm up run really kills me, I'm 185lbs 5ft9 if that has anything to do with it, my legs are fine as is my core etc but my breathing is really hard and uncomfortable i know im just a beginner but for months i have ran at the beginning of every tae kwon do class clas, why am i struggling with 2 minutes and will it ever get better or am i just not made for running.

    Thank you for your time.

    #2
    How fast are you running? When I did couch-5km a little while ago, I found that slowing down my pace a bit enabled me to improve my endurance. So I worked on running a slow 5km, then focused on improving my speed from there.

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      #3
      I totally agree with silent wolf. Try comparing your speed to the one you were used to at your class. Maybe you will find that you are running faster now.
      This can easily happen when noone else is around to set your pace to.

      Try running slower then and what helps me in these times is focussing on the rhythm of your steps. As long as it sound like running it counts. Then slow down the pace by shortening your stride.
      Maybe you can find some music that has a fitting rhythm. ABBA works great for me.
      Last edited by Mad Mary; January 10th, 2019, 10:41 PM.

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        #4
        Thank you for the replies, I am running faster than usual because I would like to be able to go faster for longer because in my classes im always being over lapped, do you think it would be a better approach to build distance before speed?

        How would i go about improving speed once i can run the distance? Say 5k is the goal and i manage to run it would i then do 3k bit faster or what?

        Thank you for your time! 😃

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          #5
          I would definitely go for distance before speed, just to build up a solid base. Plus, you're likely to find yourself getting faster just by running regularly.

          To focus on improving speed, you should take a look at this article. It has some workouts for improving speed and endurance. There are also some sprinting programs in the running section which you might find useful. Running on hills also helps. One thing that I did was this: for some of my 5km runs, I would do roughly the first 4km at a comfortable speed, then pick up the pace for the last kilometre or so.

          So, basically I would get comfortable running your goal distance, then work on adding some speed work in.

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            #6
            I agree with everything Silent Wolf said. If you can't make it through the 2min, then slow down, build distance before speed. Focus on time instead of mileage. Once you can run for 30min straight you can add speed work (fartleg runs, speed drills etc...).
            Last edited by BusyBumbleBee; January 11th, 2019, 12:48 PM.

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              #7
              Your respiration rate is linked to your heart rate.
              As your body places more demand on your heart for oxygenated blood and the removal of waste product generated in the muscles from exercise your respiration rate will increase.
              Sounds like you're training anaerobically (without oxygen) in your run. If you slow your pace down you will be training aerobically (with oxygen).
              Running can be both aerobic exercise and anaerobic exercise depending on the intensity. Intensity can depend on factors such as resistance (gradient/windspeed and direction etc) and pace.

              Try training using Heart Rate Training methods.
              There's plenty online about them and HR watches/chest straps are reasonably priced these days.
              Basically workout your HR zones using one of the formulae you can find online, (either age related, HR reserve related or lactate threshold related). Then you basically train in different HR zones to achieve different goals.
              It's not always as obvious as you think with the zone you should be training in though so make sure you read up on it before you finalise your training plan.

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                #8
                Thank you all for your replies i guess it will just come with time, ill slow it down and aim for time rather than speed/distance.

                Thank you for a detailed explanation tenaciousD, i do have a high resting heart rate and in the past when ive monitored it during excercise it jumps up pretty fast, how would one go about lowering their heart rate during a faster run?

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                  #9
                  You will only achieve a lower HR with training over time. There are no shortcuts.
                  You will have to do about 80% of your running time in HR Zone 2 (70 - 80% of your max HR) and the remaining 20% of your running time in HR Zone 4 (98-100% of your max HR).
                  Some watches etc will split it into more Zones so you may have a two Zone window to run in.
                  In Zone 2 you should be able to hold a conversation comfortably. In Zone 4 you will only be able to speak a word or two at a time.
                  As your fitness improves your speed will increase when in these HR zones.
                  You may wish to re-calculate your HR zones every six weeks or so, especially if you've used your resting HR in the formula you've chosen to use when calculating your max HR or Reserve HR.
                  The fitter you become the lower your Resting HR will become.

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