Marathon Training & Recovery

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    Marathon Training & Recovery

    Darebees,
    I am starting a 20 week half marathon training on Monday, and I know that my body is going to take a beating for this. Any recommendations on how to reduce the pains???

    #2
    Sleep enough, eat well (pay attention to eat enough protein to protect your muscles, carbs are important for recovery) hydrate well, don't increase training load to much (about 10% from one week to the next, every 4th week is rest week with reduced load), foam roll and stretch regularly, make sure you have the right shoes, ideally you have at least two different pairs with different characteristics, do tendon work and strength training(esp. back and core stability), pay attention to correct running form and most important: listen to your body! Don't Keep training when you feel pain!
    But as you have already run a halfmarathon you are not unfamiliar with the concept I guess?

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by BusyBumbleBee View Post
      Sleep enough, eat well (pay attention to eat enough protein to protect your muscles, carbs are important for recovery) hydrate well, don't increase training load to much (about 10% from one week to the next, every 4th week is rest week with reduced load), foam roll and stretch regularly, make sure you have the right shoes, ideally you have at least two different pairs with different characteristics, do tendon work and strength training(esp. back and core stability), pay attention to correct running form and most important: listen to your body! Don't Keep training when you feel pain!
      But as you have already run a halfmarathon you are not unfamiliar with the concept I guess?
      Thanks BusyBumbleBee
      i had forgotten about the sleeping part. I have only done a half marathon once, and that was 6 years ago. So feels like i am staring all over again. Let me have your thoughts on this training plan.

      Comment


        #4
        What I don't like about this plan is that you never run longer than 10min without a break up until race day, this way you don't learn how pace yourself correctly. Except if you want to do ot the same way in the race? What was it that appealed to you on this plan?
        Have you had a look on the plans on darebee? I feel like those might prepare you better for this feat and if you combine the 8weeks to 5k with the 12 weeks to half marathon you also end up with 20weeks but you will have run 105min in one go before your race. Be aware that any plan that only takes 20 weeks from nill to half marathon is ambitious and depending on your current fitness level, weight etc. bears a significant potential of injury.

        I took more than a year from couch potatoe to a half marathon race and I still had problems after the race due to overload symptoms. But I hadn't done any regular training for years before I started running and was also a bit overweight, so this does not mean that it is not feasable at all.

        Just take care!


        Comment


          #5
          I second the rolling and shoes. While I only used the same type of shoes (Altra Lone Peak 3.0 fit me like a glove) and I do recommend trying different ones until you find the perfect fit and only using your running shoes for running. Also the rotating shoes to help them last longer is a myth (it does help give them time to air out and smell less) but track your miles for your shoes as most shoes only have a 400 mile ish life span (some more some less).

          Depending on how you want to do in your race your plan could work but you are topping out at 10 miles. You would probably be able to complete the run without stopping but you would be worn out and have to potential of starting out too hot and burning out. Time frame is really up to you and the longer build up the better but I would try for some longer runs than just 10, I would honestly push to about 15 miles in a go if you want to run the whole race strong.

          If you are just looking to finish though just make sure you are having fun and being consistent and you should make it.

          Comment


            #6
            Azercord the idea behind my recommendation of rotating shoes is not to make the individual pair last longer (although they automatically do when you put less mileage on them in a given time) but to make your muscles work in different ways by using different types of shoes and thus ultimately make your feet/ legs/ tendons stronger and avoid injury.e.g. I use shoes from the same brand but with different drop and support/cushoning.

            This is not a must have as you can always do extra footwork to compensate for that of course and I totally second your statement regarding finding the perfect fit!

            Comment


              #7
              BusyBumbleBee my apologies as I do agree with your statement on different shoe types but I wasn't very clear about it. I know a lot of running who do that especially if they run road only and it seems to work very well. I threw the myth part in there as many people associate the two. I only use the same type of shoe but I have good access to trails and run on those to pick up the additional foot/joint strength.

              Comment


                #8
                Azercord thank you for the clarification. I do run all terrains and still think I benefit from different models but, well maybe that’s just me needing an excuse to buy more shoes

                Comment


                  #9
                  Running shoes are expensive, I am pretty sure that the shoes I have are not running shoes but they will have to do until I can afford a decent pair of shoes.

                  BusyBumbleBee I liked the plan because it broke down each run into intervals, didn't actually realize that it had very little mileage. The darebee plans looks good, taking a look and seeing if I can fit into my schedule.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Azercord View Post
                    I second the rolling and shoes. While I only used the same type of shoes (Altra Lone Peak 3.0 fit me like a glove) and I do recommend trying different ones until you find the perfect fit and only using your running shoes for running. Also the rotating shoes to help them last longer is a myth (it does help give them time to air out and smell less) but track your miles for your shoes as most shoes only have a 400 mile ish life span (some more some less).

                    Depending on how you want to do in your race your plan could work but you are topping out at 10 miles. You would probably be able to complete the run without stopping but you would be worn out and have to potential of starting out too hot and burning out. Time frame is really up to you and the longer build up the better but I would try for some longer runs than just 10, I would honestly push to about 15 miles in a go if you want to run the whole race strong.

                    If you are just looking to finish though just make sure you are having fun and being consistent and you should make it.
                    Thanks
                    I remember I was really worn out when I did my first half marathon in 2013. I used to log miles of about 25miles a week. What I really want to avoid is injury
                    What does one look for in a running shoe?

                    Comment


                      #11
                      First of all the shoe has to be comfortable and the size has to be right, it must neither be too tight nor too loose because in both cases you’ll be prone to get blisters, or blue toenails. From my experience you‘ll feel pretty fast which shoe fits best when you try several models. Then you need to know if you need a neutral shoe, or something that offers more stability in case your ankle tips to the inside, or outside. Than there is cushioning. How much you want there depends a bit on your running style ( heel, midfoot, or front striker) on your weight and on the kind of routes you will mainly be running. As a heel striker and/or running mainly on hard ground like asphalt a bit more cushioning is beneficial, same holds true when you carry a lot of weight.

                      The shoes do not have to be from an expensive brand, as long as they fit. Do you maybe have some discounters or something like Decathlon who offer house a brand where you could look? Those are often more affordable than the big brands.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Yeah I went to a running store so that they could look at my gate, measure my foot, and I could try out a few pairs of shoes (you can run a couple of miles and feel the hot spots really fast). Once I found my shoe I bought the first pair from them because they helped me out so much and ever since then I just hit up the internet for good deals.

                        Also if you are looking to save some money aim for last years model as it will be cheaper. The only reason to step up to a newer model is if there were some major changes for the better of the shoe. For example the Lone Peak 3.0 is great on my foot but I find the 3.5 to be garbage as it rubs my arch funny.

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                          #13
                          I noticed that the darebee half marathon plan does not have any rest day indicated. Is this alright

                          Comment


                            #14
                            You have non running days where you do other stuff and walking days that are also recreational so that should be ok

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