5km / ~3,1miles in just 20min [Running]

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    #16
    Warmaker ... I, too, have run. One year (30+ years ago) I ran a 10K every other week. Sometimes every week.
    I hovered at just under 50 minutes most races.
    Then one day I decided to run a 5K in between. Only 5K, so I pushed it. Came in just under 20 minutes and decided to finish the second half. (two 5K loops)
    Finished the second 5K in ~42 minutes (total) ... and I was as tired as I deserved to be. It felt good.
    If someone can finish a 5K in ~30 minutes today, extended training can get you to 20 minutes in a month.
    The next 5 minutes, though ... harder. And I've run in 10Ks where the winner ran mid-20s!

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      #17
      I agree with along DaithiMeyer's line. If you train speed (I would call 5k to 5 miles speed work) you will get faster but it can only really be done in the short distance arena. Sprint sets, hill work, and strength training are a must along with naturally being able to sprint (like Warmaker said a 20 minute 5k is fast) and even 3 months might not be enough if you aren't a natural sprinter.

      Like Warmaker I'm a distance guy and even the 10k realm is considered a pretty short run for me so I don't naturally sprint (I can go fairly quick for a loooong time but my "sprint" is slow). A 30 minute 5k is easy for me but a full effort (granted I've never raced a 5k before) training run is around 22 minutes for me and that's all the tank has.

      Train for it, keep it as a goal, push for it and let it motivate you but realize that a 20 minute 5k is really fast so don't hurt yourself trying to get there and know that even getting close is an achievement in itself.

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        #18
        Originally posted by DaithiMeyer View Post
        Warmaker ... I, too, have run. One year (30+ years ago) I ran a 10K every other week. Sometimes every week.
        I hovered at just under 50 minutes most races.
        Then one day I decided to run a 5K in between. Only 5K, so I pushed it. Came in just under 20 minutes and decided to finish the second half. (two 5K loops)
        Finished the second 5K in ~42 minutes (total) ... and I was as tired as I deserved to be. It felt good.
        If someone can finish a 5K in ~30 minutes today, extended training can get you to 20 minutes in a month.
        The next 5 minutes, though ... harder. And I've run in 10Ks where the winner ran mid-20s!
        A 50 minute 6 mile run isn't a big deal if you've been running every week. That's good speed. I can see throwing in a sub-20 but you're already trained and rolling. I think the question on the table is for someone who doesn't go drop 10ks four times a month.

        And, just because I'm a math and numbers guy, I'm impressed that someone could pop off a 10k in the mid-20s. A 24 minute 10k is just a shade over a 4 minute mile pace (six miles in a row). That's a world class athlete who ran in your race there because Almaz Ayana holds the world record at 29:17.45 to win an Olympic gold at Rio a few years back. And the men's record is 26:17.53 by Kenenisa Bekele in the mid-2000s.

        Again, I'm impressed that you ended up competing in a race with world record talent. The best I ever see at my 10k runs is 35 minutes and up. You have some great runners around you.

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          #19
          If you want to increase your running quality you had to run (e.g. several times during the week).
          Moreover as@ Azercord said variety is a important point in running training

          Originally posted by Azercord View Post
          Sprint sets, hill work, and strength training are a must along with naturally being able to sprint (like Warmaker said a 20 minute 5k is fast) and even 3 months might not be enough if you aren't a natural sprinter.
          Anywat, I think that you can find this article (http://www.livestrong.com/article/19...training-plan/) very interesting

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            #20
            As you are not such an experienced runner I ask you not to do the 5 miles daily! It'll hurt! What you can do is jog slowly 1-2 miles as warm up for your usual exercise. Make sure you hit hills (hilly course or hill repeats, push on the uphills) and do a slightly longer than 5k every week!
            As an anecdote: in my only marathon I covered the first half 21k/13.2miles at 4 mins/km. I hadn't specifically trained for it.
            As long as you train well, don't stress and keep an easy going or rock n'roll attitude while training a little, but include the right workouts, results will come fast.

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              #21
              Originally posted by EricThePersistent View Post
              As you are not such an experienced runner I ask you not to do the 5 miles daily! It'll hurt! What you can do is jog slowly 1-2 miles as warm up for your usual exercise. Make sure you hit hills (hilly course or hill repeats, push on the uphills) and do a slightly longer than 5k every week!
              As an anecdote: in my only marathon I covered the first half 21k/13.2miles at 4 mins/km. I hadn't specifically trained for it.
              As long as you train well, don't stress and keep an easy going or rock n'roll attitude while training a little, but include the right workouts, results will come fast.
              I am curious. How did the second half of your marathon go? I have run the first half too fast and I flamed out the second half and struggled to finish.

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                #22
                Warmaker I was too fast as well. I just had to take the opportunity to have at least two people breaking the wind in front of me who kept their pace totally even. It was a good boost. I finished in 3h11. After the calves became rock-hard, movement became rather a stomping than a running motion. Fuel was ok, I just did not run more than a half in training the month leading up to the race. It was all short trail runs and long mtb rides.

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                  #23
                  Originally posted by Warmaker View Post
                  And, just because I'm a math and numbers guy, I'm impressed that someone could pop off a 10k in the mid-20s. A 24 minute 10k is just a shade over a 4 minute mile pace (six miles in a row). That's a world class athlete who ran in your race there because Almaz Ayana holds the world record at 29:17.45 to win an Olympic gold at Rio a few years back. And the men's record is 26:17.53 by Kenenisa Bekele in the mid-2000s.

                  Again, I'm impressed that you ended up competing in a race with world record talent. The best I ever see at my 10k runs is 35 minutes and up. You have some great runners around you.
                  The guys I was running against were at the front of the pack at the start. We all knew they would win. We were not competing with them, we were trying to beat TWICE their time! A minute and a half (OK, not precisely "MID 20s") was an excellent time, and cutting even 30 seconds off THAT ... what world records are made for. It was NOT a world record pace, or it was not a record-established course?
                  The race referenced was a Corporate Challenge ... there may have been a few "specialists" in there. I finished THAT race in ~46? ~47? Nothing to be ashamed of, I was the fastest on my team. Our team was NOT the fastest in the race.
                  The race where I finished ~42 was nearly a year later. And was my personal best.

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                    #24
                    5K is my preferred racing distance and the distance my training is most geared towards. At the height of my running career, when I was training seriously 7 days a week, I could run a sub 20 minute 5K. My training schedule at that time was:

                    Mondays: 6.5 km tempo run
                    Tuesdays: interval training with hills. Usually something like:

                    5 x 100 metre sprint uphill with jog down
                    5 x 200 metre sprint uphill with jog down
                    5 x 300 metre sprint uphill with jog down
                    5 x 800 metre loop (including a hill) with 3 min. rest between loops

                    Wednesdays: 6.5 km tempo run
                    Thursdays: interval training with hills (similar to Tuesday workout)
                    Fridays: easy 5K jog (usually to familiarize myself with Saturday's race course)
                    Saturdays: 5K race
                    Sundays: 8-10K easy run

                    However (and this is a BIG however): I did not go from no running to the above schedule overnight. The most likely result of such a transition would be injury.

                    If I was currently doing no running, I would begin with C25K style training, alternating running and walking, and gradually adjusting the ratio of running:walking, until I was running the full 5K, 5 days a week. Since you already have a good cardio base from doing Power Cardio, you will be able to progress faster than the standard C25K plan. But you still want to give your body time to adjust to such a high volume of the repetitive running action. Also: a 30 minute 5K is a lot slower than a 20 minute 5K. If you go from no running to doing a lot of mileage at your current pace, you will be training your body to run at a slow pace. By starting with run/walk intervals, you will be doing the running portions at a much faster pace, so you'll be teaching your body that running = going fast. Then you work on building the endurance to sustain that faster pace for longer and longer distances. Once you have a good training base of running under your belt, and are regularly running 5 days a week, start doing intervals for one of your training days. If that goes well for at least a couple of weeks, add in the second interval training day.

                    I cannot give you an exact schedule for how quickly to progress with a running plan as every body is different. I would suggest that you give up any ideas of a timeline for now and just work on building up your training base safely. Then reassess where you are at. (Hopefully already down in the 25 min. 5K range by the time you're training as I've described above.) Then you will have a better idea of a realistic timeline to set for your 20 minute goal.

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                      #25
                      Helps a lot!!! Thanks

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