Doctor says I have a Paraumbilical Hernia.....

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  • Nihopaloa
    replied
    I don't want to be that person, abigail12 and thepresident, but the last reply is almost four years back and the OP isn't even active any more. Maybe it would benefit someone with the same problem, though

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  • thepresident
    replied
    In the case that the second opinion conferm the diagnosis, I suggest to talk with a sport physician.
    She/he can give more details and advices about a good training practices coherent with your problem.

    Anyway, for what concern weigth loss, core exercises are overestimated (as wrote above, the only way to lose weigth is a deficit of cal).

    Core exercises are useful to build strenght in the core; one can have very strong core but can not have six back, which is related to the body fat percentuage.


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  • abigail12
    replied
    I think you should see another doctor for advice. Maybe the doctor you've visited just made a mistake, all people make mistakes and it's OK. I have a friend and we are also working together. She often got sick and had symptoms like sore throat and body rash. So she went to the doctor and he didn't find anything he said it was the flu. My friend went to another doctor and he advised her to get tested for HIV. She ordered a full HIV blood test from Prescription Doctor’s online pharmacy. And she was diagnosed with Primary HIV Infection and now she's getting treatment and I hope everything will be OK.

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  • MacNoCheese
    replied
    Thanks for all the advice, I am actually going back to the doctor next week for a second opinion, having looked at Paraumbilical hernias again - mine is nothing like it! First, mine doesn't stem from the belly button area, mines about 3-4 inches above that, if I had to self diagnose it looks more like a diastasis hernia

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  • Baston
    replied
    MacNoCheese - thanks for the follow-up information. You've gotten some great tips!

    Jewels touches on why it's important to not ignore this, but as Noen and 'rin suggest, there are still things you can do to stay fit. Good luck!

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  • Jewels
    replied
    Hi MacNoCheese , I seen your post and had to comment. I am a surgical Tech and have done many many many of these hernia surgeries. 1st your doctor is correct, stay away from abdominal workouts. You can deffinetly do more harm than good. A hernia is where a portion of the intestines comes through a tear or small hole in the abdominal wall. If small enough can be treated non surgically if not symptomatic. When you put strain on that area (crunches) you are forcing your intestines through that hole, which can result in a larger tear and or a life threatening issue called an Incarcerated hernia, which is where the intestines get trapped in the abdominal wall and basically cuts off all circulation to that portion of the intestines. That can end up with more serious surgery. I would try with diet change and do cardio workouts, jogging, elliptical, things that wont put strain on the abdomen. Then go back to the doctor and ask for a plan of action. Explain your concerns with your fitness goals and you dont want to harm yourself by them and is there a way to have the hernia fixed so you can be free to do the workouts you love. Good luck and I am sure if you drop a little weight and go in for another visit you may have some better answers. Best of luck to you.

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  • 'rin
    replied
    If you are going to exercise specifically to cut weight (altho I am a diet believer myself and used very low carb when I was dieting bc I hate feeling hungry) then your focus should prolly be cardio, anyway. Run/walk/go swimming/jump rope/etc....no ab work necessary, just add more movement to help burn cals and make a larger deficit.

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  • Noen
    replied
    This would be a reason to either see the doctor again and ask more detailed information or go to a different doctor.
    Search the web for other people who have paraumbilical hernias, what kind of exercises they do.

    But in the meantime do exercises that aren't ab-focused and eat healthily.

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  • MacNoCheese
    replied
    Originally posted by Baston View Post
    General surgery isn't my field, but as a student I was involved in tons of hernia surgeries... You've had the hernia all your life, the real question is: is the hernia symptomatic? Do you notice a bulge when you cough/sneeze/strain? Do you have pain? Is this something that was found incidentally with some other exam? A lot of people have hernias and nothing needs to be done with their lifestyles or surgically because they're asymptomatic... If I were in your shoes, I would meet with a surgeon and ask the very questions that have been brought up here about weight loss with decreased or minimal exercise, as well as another key question: does anything need to be done about the hernia? And if so: what?

    Good luck!
    Hi Baston, it only shows/comes up when I do crunches. When I spoke to the doctor to ask about it, she asked if it hurt - which it doesn't. As a result because it doesn't hurt they are not willing to do anything about it, I live in the UK so we get free healthcare but I expected more help and advice from my doctor, all I got was - you shouldnt do crunches, nothing offered as an alternative whatsoever. As such I cannot be referred to a surgeon or specialist - for now I will battle through it. My diet is quite well balanced, I know somewhere beneath the layer of fat is a six pack screaming to be let out!!!

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  • Baston
    replied
    General surgery isn't my field, but as a student I was involved in tons of hernia surgeries... You've had the hernia all your life, the real question is: is the hernia symptomatic? Do you notice a bulge when you cough/sneeze/strain? Do you have pain? Is this something that was found incidentally with some other exam? A lot of people have hernias and nothing needs to be done with their lifestyles or surgically because they're asymptomatic... If I were in your shoes, I would meet with a surgeon and ask the very questions that have been brought up here about weight loss with decreased or minimal exercise, as well as another key question: does anything need to be done about the hernia? And if so: what?

    Good luck!

    Leave a comment:


  • DaithiMeyer
    replied
    Noen and Azercord ... no need to push, here. We are all saying the same things, just different slants.
    MacNoCheese could eat all his calories as, in essence, 'sugar'.
    He would not get enough nutrients to survive, but it would be such a tasty way to go.
    And he could follow my advice, stop eating sugar and carbs, and still gain weight because he still ate too much.
    And ... yeah ... CICO is a lot of intricate math to do while working out your exercise routines.
    Yet, we all agree. To lose weight, he needs to eat less. At least, less calories.
    And he can't do that if he is eating calorie-dense foods and still feeling empty.
    THAT is a major failing most weight-loss regimens fall into. Forcing you to suffer while losing.
    Yes ... cutting out sugar and sweetened drinks is no fun. It doesn't leave you feeling like you are starving.
    Let us know what you chose to do and how it worked for you. You Can't Eat Just One.

    Leave a comment:


  • Noen
    replied
    Well CICO via workouts is pretty hard when you are overeating a lot. Overeating by as little as two chocolate bars a day will mean two hours of exercise just to compensate for the overeating and THEN another hour of exercise to lose weight.
    Not eating two chocolate bars and substituting all sugary drinks throughout the day with water is A LOT easier than working out for three hours and it will prevent future weight gain.
    Because if you are compensating overeating with workouts then you will start gaining weight again the day you stop working out.

    Exercise is good (the muscle maps will help you, make sure the abs are at most the lightest possible shade of red) but the real key to weight loss is diet.
    Even small changes will make a difference. I could cut out quite a bit just by cutting the amount of butter on my bread in half.

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  • Azercord
    replied
    I'm actually going to contradict some of what was said because it really is simple to start losing weight only using calories in versus calories out (CICO). You don't have to change a thing in what you eat so long as you burn more calories than you consume you will lose weight, simple math easy to do.

    That being said if you want to feel good while losing the weight and feel full then you might have to clean things up (I have no idea what your diet is) because volume is the name of the game. Let say you burn 2500 calories a day, to lose a pound a week you would eat 2000 calories a day. You can eat that in chocolate bars and lose weight, you aren't going to be able to eat very many bars because they are calorie dense but you could do it and you would be hungry most of the time. Or you could eat good veggies and lean protein and good carbs and be full most of the time and still only consume those 2000 calories and the weight loss will be easier.

    I would recommend CICO because it is simple and straight forward and easy to start. You can also add in the If It Fits Your Macros (IIFYM) method to help you balance your carb/protein/fat intakes. You can google both of these methods for more information. You can also use many online calculators to find your basic calorie intake. I would recommend myfitnesspal as a good calorie tracker as well.

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  • DaithiMeyer
    replied
    MacNoCheese ... welcome to The Hive, the Social side of DareBee.
    As mentioned, weight loss is mainly due to your eating. Or not.
    The exercise is there to insure that you don't lose too much muscle in the process.
    I get the impression you think you can target the fat on your midriff by working your abs. Not the case.
    Fat is lost where it is lost, you cannot - short of surgery - decide which fat will be lost. I face this sad fact daily.
    The easiest food-control advice I can give is to cut out all sugars. ALL sugars. Including honey.
    A step further? Lower your complex carb intake. Pasta. Cake. Beer. Pizza. Pastry. Chips.
    This will take you a while to work into your life. Because It's HARD.
    But you have to do this before you start counting calories in/calories out.
    Meanwhile ... start with the Foundation Light Program or the <Totals> Program. Work on your form, not on beating your body into submission. Time for that later.
    Best of luck.

    Leave a comment:


  • Azercord
    replied
    Weight loss is primarily done with diet so that part is doable, weigh your food, track your intake, and eat at a deficit. That method will get you your weight loss even without exercise but exercise does help make things easier and you will look better when you lose the weight as you will have a good solid muscle base to work with.

    I'm not going to even try to over ride the advise of a doctor but I would suggest you ask them what are the things you can do, how far you can push things (warning signs of pushing too far), and what are some possible long term solutions/fixes you can aim for? Can you lose the weight and get surgery to fix the issue or is this something you will have to work around for the rest of your life?

    There is plenty you can still do but I would recommend starting with your diet and add in exercise as/when you can.

    Leave a comment:

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