Ladder-style/pyramid workouts?

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    Ladder-style/pyramid workouts?

    Hey guys,

    I was wondering, what are the advantages and disadvantages of using a ladder-style or pyramid style of workout to train? Which areas of fitness is it best used for? (e.g. cardiovascular endurance, muscular endurance, strength, etc.), I'm right now struggling to understand what actual benefits just going say 5, 10, 15, 20, 15, 10, 5 reps of a particular exercise (these numbers are completely arbitrary) is apart from gradually going up and down, and getting in a lot of volume quickly.

    ‚ÄčAny thoughts? I'll just tag Damer and TheRaven just in case. ^__^
    Thanks

    #2
    thanks for raising the question DrShellgon . Given we might touch the point could you also elaborate on some methods like descending ladders or other convict style methods like juarez ladders (20-1;19-2;18-3;17-4;16-5;15-6; etc There was an article here that has some methods used : http://www.artofmanliness.com/2015/0...soner-workout/
    I would be really curious to have Damer or TheRaven 's views on this since to me it is just a method to load a lot of reps and load to the muscles making it sort of entertaining for people that are locked and haven't many stimuli... It works rather good I think to make someone very big but lacks badly the structure and completeness of Darebee workouts but the postulates are different... either on time to dedicate to get results, profile of people and goals (functional fitness vs getting bigger to discourage potential aggressors...)

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      #3
      xingyiquan pyramid style exercises are strength rather than bulk orientated. They load muscle groups that are tired reducing the reps but increasing the load. When that is done with bodyweight training the technique changes to become more challenging DrShellgon so push ups (as an example) may start off with say 20 straight push-ups and then 15 diamond push ups and then 10 one-armed push ups and then five handstand push ups. There are some training routines which use the principle to create active rest intervals - for instance using only diamond push ups you do 20 fast. Then 2 slow ones then 15 fast then 2 slow ones etc.

      This is a good discussion on the subject and I am glad you both started it as there are still many things that are not very clear about it. Basically the principle is to work tired muscles with a higher load but fewer reps as they get more and more tired. This hardens the muscles' ability to work under load and makes them more resistant to fatigue. xingyiquan you are right that in prison movies (at least) they use this kind of training a lot possible because it looks impressive but also most probably because it leads to real gains in performance as the muscles get more resistant to fatigue. There is more than a little of that element built into the structure of a lot of the Darebee workouts so that muscles can get resistant to fatigue. It is a progressive thing, of course.

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        #4
        Ah I see, thanks Damer for that explanation!

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          #5
          thanks Damer I have again learnt something and received a suggestion for free on top of that- I never thought about using one and the same exercise to in this way using rythm for recover... I was rather thinking on the other way round i.e. using a base of let's say 20 punches for base rythm and then bursts of a few reps to enhance cardio levels prior to return to the base level.
          I also saw the ladder way of building up a massive number of reps of one and the same exercise with lower weight like a little what is seen in the Lafay method that is more bulk than pure strength oriented but I have seen it with the wrong lens and indeed most programs in here really have a similar way of building up.-

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            #6
            xingyiquan I am really glad it helped and once again it shows, once again, just how very valuable these conversations are. They allow us to explore subjects and concepts that we might otherwise have never even thought to talk about. Unless we discuss them we cannot really see what works and what doesn't and how. I am grateful you and DrShellgon started this.

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            • #7
              The prison workout has been doing the rounds for quite some time now. Most people who do not know what a prison workout
              To Know more Click Here

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                #8
                Besides bodyweight exercises I sometimes do pyramid interval running. What I like about it is that your mind is focussed on counting, not occupied on how you feel or doing. While going up the latter fatique builds up. In a single session you can have high intensity, low intensity for recovery and repeat at varying distances. Time flies when doing such a session. The workload or total distance ramps up fast.


                example: 200m /rest/ 400m /rest/ 600m /rest/ 800m /rest/ 1000m /rest/ 800m /rest/ 600m /rest/ 400m /rest/ 200m (rest = 200m).

                Here I start the session with 1K (baseline) warm up, during the pyramid I can keep up my pace above my 1K start speed, I think you can can call a session like this speed conditioning. At the end of the session my recovery is not that good, but I can keep up the pace pretty well.

                Click image for larger version  Name:	pyramid.png Views:	0 Size:	116.7 KB ID:	783286

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