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Any Norse Pagans out there?

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  • DerekV81
    replied
    Hello Rathgar, your lucky I would love to see Stonehenge in person. I know this will sound silly to some but i would love to have a stone or dirt from there as I believe there is magic in the land and stone and it would be a wonderful connection to the past and the ancestors there that has come before us.

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  • Rathgar
    replied
    Loving this thread.
    I don't live far from Stonehenge and Avebury
    More pls

    Jai jai Hanuman

    Sub Ek

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  • Anpuankhses
    replied
    I'm a Kemetic pagan (Ancient Egypt), but i'm a little norse too and I wanna learn more. I love to talk and learn about all the ancient cultures and gods (Specially eruopean and mediterranean ones). So if anybody wanna talk...

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  • Legolo
    replied
    If you´d want to sacrifice an animal, horses were a very popular choice, since they were very important status symbols. But you´d have to eat it afterwards. That´s why it was illegal to eat horse meat in Iceland during the christianization. Horse is actually pretty tasty. There was this one butcher that always gave you a piece of horse sausage as advertisement for horse meat when you bought a sausage at his stall on market days... But that´s really off topic

    One of the biggest problems is the lack of actual sources from the Viking Age, most if not all written sources were made centuries later by, drumroll please, christian monks. So it´s nearly impossible to say if important parts are not exaggerated or straight up fictional. For example, most sagas were written down between 1100 and 1300 and as we know the "viking age" lasted from 793 til 1066. From Lindisfarne to Stamford Bridge. They hammered those dates into us so much at university I´ll never forget them

    And yes. Since we can´t know how things were back then we all have to find our own way. At least until somebody finally invents time travel.

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  • DerekV81
    replied
    Your right Legolo I do follow my own heart when it comes to the Gods, your also correct about Adam being a Christian and im sure his views were influenced by his faith among other things . As I said in my post does it even matter? I feel close to Freyr and have not worked much with Odin.So to me Freyr would be the middle as that is the God I feel most connected to with Thor on the right and Odin on the left. Adam of Bremen was not there this is also fact, however I just thought it was kind of neat that there was such a record of this place and your right in saying we also dont know if there was a place such as this which is why I said was it even true. I feel that the Gods speak to us all differently and as such I follow my own path and try not to hold to the past it was only a thought of if it is true and was a fact then I wonder how it would have looked like is all.We dont know much about the past and how the gods were worshiped and what we do have is mostly based on second hand source and Christian writings it is up to us to pick through what we do have,trace, what we can and find a way to connect to the Gods on our own terms. My offerings and blots will be different then everyone else, just like when I talk to the Gods I feel the wind pick up and there is an energy in the air that is electric for some it may be warmth or a sense of peace...or nothing at all. Ours is a path of homework and trusting in our heart what we do is done with love for the Gods and not a recreation of the past. I would not go and sacrifice a cow or animal for the Gods as they did years ago, but I will share a drink of my favorite Scotch with The All Father and thank him for what he has done and has gifted me, for a gift deserves a gift and a gift given is a gift received..

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  • Legolo
    replied
    You really can´t use Adam of Bremen as a source for anything. A) He was never at Uppsala, everything he knows is from danish diplomats and the danish king, which are both highly unreliable sources for a temple in Sweden. Adams work is more like a fantasy novel than a historical chronicle. B) Nobody knows if it was actually a temple or just a place of outdoors worship. Archeaological digs in Gamla Uppsala have not yielded any useful information about a temple, just some circumstantial evidence that there was probably a place of worship. Sadly the excavation of the two lines of poles wasn´t finished because the funding ran out

    And most importantly: don´t model anything after some old pieces of paper from some christian guys. Paganism is a very individual system and whatever feels right for you is right for you. Not everybody worships the same gods equally. For example, I worship Odin and Bragi, while Freyr or Thor are not really important to me.

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  • Kanary
    replied
    Originally posted by DerekV81 View Post
    I finally finished my shrine the other day (and yes i said that in my head with the Letterkenny voice, props if your a fan and understand LOL). It was said by Adam of Bremen that in the Temple at Uppsala that there were three thrones One for Thor in the middle with the other two for Odin and Freyr. I had Freyr and thanks to his blessings of abundance (he is the god of grain and gold..among other things) I was able to complete my set of Grimfrost statues for my indoor shrine/altar. So now i wonder which side Odin was on and which side Freyr was on, but then again does it even matter? Or for that matter was what Adam said true, who knows?
    Well, Odin's stronghold at Sigtuna (Ynglinga saga, ch 5) is almost directly south of Uppsala, so you could place his statue toward the south?

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  • DerekV81
    replied
    I finally finished my shrine the other day (and yes i said that in my head with the Letterkenny voice, props if your a fan and understand LOL). It was said by Adam of Bremen that in the Temple at Uppsala that there were three thrones One for Thor in the middle with the other two for Odin and Freyr. I had Freyr and thanks to his blessings of abundance (he is the god of grain and gold..among other things) I was able to complete my set of Grimfrost statues for my indoor shrine/altar. So now i wonder which side Odin was on and which side Freyr was on, but then again does it even matter? Or for that matter was what Adam said true, who knows?

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  • DerekV81
    replied
    Welcome Daeg always nice to see another Norse pagan and look forward to talking with you more and learning with and from you.

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  • Daeg
    replied
    I'm from Croatia, also a Norse pagan, been for around six years I think. I've read many books about Norse religion and mythology and even wrote a paper about it when I was studying data science year ago. Now I'm at the art academy and there are a few like minded people there that I can talk to about the norse beliefs and practices.

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  • Soloakel
    replied
    Cristian here hope everyone is having a good day

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  • Kanary
    replied
    I doubt everyone including myself! No one can stop me!

    I haven't read Widukind, so my knowledge there is all second-hand. And yeah, what I don't know is if he makes a bunch of questionable assertions about Saxon pagans, or if he can be basically trusted on that.

    And, honestly, I also don't trust translations: I won't trust it until I've seen it in the Latin because I know what people put into Bede's mouth that simply is not actually in the text. I assume the same goes for Widukind, no matter how honest he may otherwise be.

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  • Legolo
    replied
    Kanary How dare you doubt Widukind of Corvey? His Res gesta saxonicae is THE source for anything concerning "Germany" around 1000AD. He´s the Bede the Venerable of the time. That being said, he is a christian historian, so I´m not sure myself if his knowledge about saxon pagans goes deeper than the common knowledge back then.
    A pal from my university days had a band named Saxnot. Not sure what happened to them, though.

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  • Kanary
    replied
    Originally posted by DerekV81 View Post
    See much of what I understood was that the Saxons Norse and Celts all shared somewhat of the same view or ideas on the same Gods, just of course a different way of saying and doing it in every tribe village city and even household much like what Legolo used as an example of Odin,Wodan, and Wotan to speak of the All Father. I have seen it connected to Norse paganism by some to represent the world tree, was not sure if it actually fit within the Norse path or tradition because again as I understood it was not the Norse Gods roots based on the Germanic Gods and so then would not some of those traditions carry over. Sorry not trying to sound stupid just perhaps more confused then anything and that's what I love about this path is that it truly is the spiritual path with homework and it is always good to ask questions and learn, one can not go on personal gnosis or for that matter unverified personal gnosis alone.
    So here's the thing: Odin, Wotan, Woden - those are all basically the same word and the stories about that deity show a certain set of traits he generally has.
    Ditto Frigga / Frijja - she's got a set of traits when we see her in the surviving stories.

    Irminsul, on the other hand, doesn't have a direct linguistic correlation in either Icelandic or Anglo-Saxon. (It could exist in Anglo-Saxon; both words exist, there just isn't an instance where they come together to describe a Great Pillar.) And while it's clearly an object of worship, what it *meant* is entirely unknown. Widukind says it was worshipped as the body of the god, which doesn't make it a good correlation to the World Tree, but does he know? What else does Widukind say and do we take other things he says at face value? (I'm not overly familiar with Widukind, so my answer is ???)

    Similarly, trying to force "Irmin" to be a specific known deity is really problematic: The word literally just means "Great" or "Universal", so it's basically applicable to any deity you might fancy. Insofar as the Irminsul is a strictly Saxon thing, I would personally recommend Saxnot, who I'm sure could use some love.

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  • DerekV81
    replied
    See much of what I understood was that the Saxons Norse and Celts all shared somewhat of the same view or ideas on the same Gods, just of course a different way of saying and doing it in every tribe village city and even household much like what Legolo used as an example of Odin,Wodan, and Wotan to speak of the All Father. I have seen it connected to Norse paganism by some to represent the world tree, was not sure if it actually fit within the Norse path or tradition because again as I understood it was not the Norse Gods roots based on the Germanic Gods and so then would not some of those traditions carry over. Sorry not trying to sound stupid just perhaps more confused then anything and that's what I love about this path is that it truly is the spiritual path with homework and it is always good to ask questions and learn, one can not go on personal gnosis or for that matter unverified personal gnosis alone.

    Leave a comment:

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