Mental Image Training.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Mental Image Training.

    So, I thought that, a Mental Image Training partner would be a pretty cool idea. Like, kinda like fighting a Mental Image of somebody else, kinda like Goku in Dragon Ball does. Meditating about it might be cool also. I'm going to try it out.

    #2
    Originally posted by IWillGoSuperSaiyan View Post
    So, I thought that, a Mental Image Training partner would be a pretty cool idea. Like, kinda like fighting a Mental Image of somebody else, kinda like Goku in Dragon Ball does. Meditating about it might be cool also. I'm going to try it out.
    Great saiyans think alike. I actually just created a post about this subject here.
    I'll image train with you but there are conditions needed for it, see the photo below.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	The-seven-components-of-the-PETTLEP-model.png
Views:	131
Size:	89.1 KB
ID:	655615

    Comment


      #3
      Ok Kakarot, I'll think about it. I will try to see what I can do, I will get done with some Age of Pandora, then tell you what I'll do.

      Comment


        #4
        IWillGoSuperSaiyan I've been thinking about how we both could do this and I think I have an idea. There's a martial arts YouTube channel that I know of and they put up tutorials for MMA, boxing, kickboxing, wrestling and I think there is also some BJJ and karate stuff.
        If we create a thread were we could image train (post video tutorials and log out training etc.) we could keep up with each other there, maybe even get other people to join us. What do you think?

        Comment


          #5
          I think it's great!
          So, Kakarot, my first thoughts for tomorrow, since it's my cardio day, are:
          For components:
          Physical: Use good form while running, I will have ankle weights on. Or have a heavy backpack, or both.
          Competitive Environment: I will be either running away from somebody, or transporting supplies to give to somebody.
          Task: Trying to get away from somebody, or transporting the supplies successfully.
          Timing: For now, I will assume that the chaser has much better cardio than me, I will last as long as possible, at a fast jog. The supplies, will be a longer run, but I can walk/jog slowly.
          Learning: I will update this tomorrow, to say how it went.
          Emotion: I will update this tomorrow, I have not tested this yet.
          Perspective: Mine, of course. At least for now. But I could be just an ordinary citizen, or a military man.

          I could do other exercises, such as basic burpees. But I have to reach as high as I can each time.
          Any thoughts?

          Comment


            #6
            So for the burpees, no thought but I will share the video of me doing the 100 burpees for the badge if that would help.

            This YouTube channel is no longer in use as I can't log in to it anymore so don't subscribe to it. I will be trying to make a new channel sometime this year.

            I tried some mental image training last night. I find it hard as it requires a lot of concentration. I was just practicing the combination from the saiyan protocol.

            Comment


              #7
              Mental imagery involves the athlete imagining themselves in an environment performing a specific activity using all of their senses (sight, hear, feel and smell). The images should have the athlete performing successfully and feeling satisfied with their performance. What can mental imagery be used for?


              Mental Imagery can be used to: Familiarize the athlete with a competition site, a racecourse, a complex play pattern or routine etc.
              Motivate the athlete by recalling images of their goals for that session, or of success in a past competition or beating a competitor in a competition
              Perfect skills or skill sequences the athlete is learning or refining
              Reduce negative thoughts by focusing on positive outcomes
              Refocus the athlete when the need arises e.g. if performance is feeling sluggish, the imagery of a previous best performance or previous best event focus can help get things back on track
              See success where the athlete sees themselves performing skills correctly and the desired outcomes
              Set the stage for a performance with a complete mental run-through of the key elements of their performance to set the athlete's desired pre-competition feelings and focus.

              Mental imagery should not focus on the outcome but on the actions to achieve the desired outcome. How do I apply mental imagery?


              Golfer Jack Nicklaus used mental imagery for every shot. In describing how he imagines his performance, he wrote:

              "I never hit a shot even in practice without having a sharp in-focus picture of it in my head. It is like a colour movie. First, I "see" the ball where I want it to finish, nice and white and sitting up high on the bright green grass. Then the scene quickly changes, and I "see" the ball going there: its path, trajectory, and shape, even its behavior on landing. Then there's a sort of fade-out, and the next scene shows me making the kind of swing that will turn the previous images into reality and only at the end of this short private Hollywood spectacular do I select a club and step up to the ball." When should mental imagery be used?


              To become proficient in the use of imagery you have to use it every day: on your way to training, during training and after training. In every training session, before you execute any skill or combination of skills, first do it in imagery. See, feel, and experience yourself moving through the actions in your mind, as you would like them to l unfold. In the competition situation use imagery before the start of the event and see your self-performing successfully/winning.

              The above information is all copied from this website but it is not all of it, if you want to read it the check here.

              Tags: IWillGoSuperSaiyan DiscipleMMA Kanary BlackButler neilarey Damer kandy XxXKiarraXxX
              Some of you, like the darebee team, I tagged because I think they could maybe do some digging and post more information on imagery training and maybe even use it themselves.
              Attached Files
              Last edited by Kakarot; February 12th, 2020, 11:46 AM.

              Comment


                #8
                Kakarot thank you for tagging me here. Visualization has been a training technique for elite athletes looking for an edge in their performance since the 1920s when sports psychology began. The ability of the mind to immerse itself in a visualization which delivers tangible psychosomatic changes is something we talked about in this article here. Visualization is not the mental image training used in Dragon Ball which, again, is not the Pettlep model used above which is primarily used for imagery interventions in specific circumstances in sports performance. In its broad application it has been found to be non-productive as it fails to deliver the expected outcomes. This has led to it being discarded except for very specific use cases because of the many parameters required to bring about any measurable results.

                Visualization on the other hand is entirely different. Although it is sometimes called mental imagery training it is far more than just visual and it involves engaging the kinesthetic past of imagery in order to activate specific neural pathways in the brain. These bring together different neural centers that deal with knowledge, experience and memory to create the behavioral changes that lead to improved sports performance.

                Obviously, anyone who wants to give the Pettlep model a go will find out some things about themselves regardless and it can only lead to improved concentration which is always a plus. But for the effort involved immersion in an RPG environment like Pandora or Zero Hero or Carbon & Dust is more likely to deliver physical, mental and psychological benefits, way faster.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Damer wow. Right that was actually easy to understand. Thanks for the information. I will adjust the first post.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    This is pretty interesting, I will still try out my idea, but I think I have much better knowledge that I will probably need to readjust it.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Hrm, this actually reminds me a lot of similar ideas you might see with something like Zombies, Run! or The Walk (apps that gamify running/walking by immersing the user in a story/utilizing alternate reality game/ARG elements while they walk, run, bike, etc). I've noticed in particular that varying trails at night and having music playing that has a beat, but does not overwhelm the hearing of the user can help aid in letting the user be immersed properly.

                      ... Me, the user is me, and I'm not sure how applicable this would be without some kind of proper scientific study exactly, but it's very directly comparable to IWillGoSuperSaiyan's notes here:

                      Physical: Use good form while running, I will have ankle weights on. Or have a heavy backpack, or both.
                      Competitive Environment: I will be either running away from somebody, or transporting supplies to give to somebody.
                      Task: Trying to get away from somebody, or transporting the supplies successfully.
                      Timing: For now, I will assume that the chaser has much better cardio than me, I will last as long as possible, at a fast jog. The supplies, will be a longer run, but I can walk/jog slowly.
                      The main difference is something like Zombies, Run!/The Walk comes with the aid of an outside, audible narrative that isn't just in your own head. It's possible you might be able to find podcasts with similar ideas (ones focused on guided meditations come to mind as well).

                      Comment


                        #12
                        This is a very good idea, and I think I know about the Zombies, run! app

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Visualization is a big part of martial arts training. It kind of goes unmentioned in my check-in thread, but it's part of my hitori geiko (solo practice): first I visualize the whole kata; then while I'm performing my half of the kata, I maintain a mental image of what my opponent is doing. (I admit that I don't visualize an environment most of the time. We're just gonna have big imaginary sword fight in my living room.)

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X