Little Things That Change the World

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    Little Things That Change the World

    In my day job I analyze systems of governance and business models, take them apart and find the flaws that can become their downfall. I was explaining to a colleague how Darebee is a disruptive power that's slowly changing the world and because he was intrigued enough to check it out and inevitably saw all our postings regarding the struggle of Light against Dark in The Battleground and was unimpressed enough with our silliness to come back and challenge me on it I had to go into greater detail painting the picture for him to see.

    I don't often put anything as detailed here but it helps sometimes to see what we do and have a sense of our own sense of power. To understand how we fit into the great world machine it's important to start with Afghanistan. It's the world's largest producer of Lapis Lazuli (a semi precious stone) and has been for over 3,000 years with its rich mines accounting for about 90% of the world's production of the stone. The wealth of its mines in that regard has been estimated to about $1 trillion USD, enough to restructure the entire country and take it from its current sorry state to the 21st century. Afghanistan is also tremendously corrupt, finishing 166th out of 168 in "The World's Most Corrupt Countries" Index with the ones at the end being the most corrupt and the ones at the top the least.

    Now, you'll think how does any of this affect us? The corruption in Afghanistan, deplorable as it may be, has nothing to do with any of us. Our problems are not theirs and vice versa. Now, because Afghanistan is so corrupt its system of governance is ineffectual. So ineffectual in fact that a couple of years ago a local warlord seized the lucrative Lapis Lazuli mines. His army has been strong enough to keep them and the amount of money he makes from issuing mining licenses and mining the stone is enough for him to pay off any government officials who might have wanted to do something about it plus all The Taliban in the region so they could stop fighting and start mining. Again, I understand, this is seemingly not out concern. Afghanistan's internal matters should not concern us and for most of us it is all taking place in a country that's really far, far away.

    What concerns us is getting healthy. having some kind of work, trying to be happy. Being safe in a world that increasingly appears to be the opposite. This is where things get interesting because it also transpires that because there is no rule of law in the mining region of Afghanistan a fair chunk of the wealth the mines delivers goes to fund ISIS representing, as a matter of fact, a full 20% of their total, estimated, operational budget. And ISIS has a direct link to terrorism and destabilization activities not just in the region but across the world, sometimes, right up to our doorstep.

    Be that as it may, you might say, fine, all these dots are connected and the world is no longer a series of isolated pockets but really none of us happens to run a country or rule a military and we are way too small, as individuals to do anything to sort this mess out. Sorting out our messy lives is about all most of us can do .

    That too is true.

    Here's the rub. In DAREBEE we have proof of our capability to connect globally, meet people, accept them without judgement and cheer them on as they become better versions of their selves. We learn, each in his or her own way to become the best we can be, becoming more tolerant, more thoughtful and more accepting along the way. And because we live in many different countries and answer to many different nationalities we learn to do so at a human level, devoid of labels.

    Our way of life and conduct: http://darebee.com/hive/way is not just digital. It seeps into the physical world. By demanding the best of ourselves, by being the best we can possibly be we raise the game for everyone. Our conduct, spirit, attitude and disposition affect those around us. We become, by tiny, tiny degrees, the change we want to see. And that change, cumulatively shifts the needle in ways we may never be able to accurately predict. And when that needle shifts it applies its own force to other things that can sometimes lead right up to the point where a national government will not tolerate corruption because it is socially unacceptable. And that then makes things like what's happening in Afghanistan less likely to happen. And all that without crusades or revolutions, just tiny changes: the willingness to look at another person and see another person, first, beyond anything else. The ability to reach out and lift the spirits of someone when they are down. The opportunity to help someone feel less alone inside their minds, less isolated and judged by the world. We are Bees (to use the analogy) because we are tiny and unnoticed, because we don't have massive banners shouting out to the rooftops what we believe in, but our work, each of us and then all of us together, changes things and affects the world. Change has to start from somewhere. Our Hive is as good a place as any

    #2
    Very well said. And I can't help but think fitting after the massacre in Orlando just this morning.

    I'm truly humbled by the members of this Hive, and to have the privilege of being a part of it. One of the most prominent to me is the bees that come here completely comfortable in their gender transitions and are met with kindness and respect. (I'm not trying to single any one group out. I come from a large city, transplanted to a VERY SMALL, one with a critical issue of bullying in the school system, and that is one issue with an unfortunately recurring theme.) That is not the case so often in real life.

    Everyone is equal, everyone is welcome, no judgement, no animosity, no matter our differences. . We are so blessed.

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      #3
      K e l l y The Hive often feels like a magical place in what we have achieved. A community of mutual respect and support and that is the result of all of us here, together.

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        #4
        Originally posted by Damer View Post
        K e l l y The Hive often feels like a magical place in what we have achieved. A community of mutual respect and support and that is the result of all of us here, together.
        I'm a relative newcomer but I love to hear about your reservations before starting the Hive And so grateful you were proved wrong. I have a sense of pride just being a part of this, even if it's only been a few months.

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          #5
          Thanks for this, Damer. I'm really struggling at the moment with world and personal events, often feeling "well what's the point in trying?", but you're right, it does matter.

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            #6
            I also love the uniqueness that each Bee brings and contributes to the Hive. When reading above I wasn't struck by the corruption part or the funding of terrorism, the part that bothers me the most is the deplorable mining practices that the Afghanis use (I'm a mining engineer) and how much better they could become allowing better profit margins, better wages, and safer mining conditions. The corruption would need to be removed for this to happen and because we are all so different here we approach problems from different positions and thought processes. The little ticks of the needle suddenly become a huge swing because it is not just a little tick from one direction, it is a little tick from a hundred different directions at the same time and there is no way to counter that.

            Any problem or issue or thought can be changed and over come because somewhere out there a little tick will strike the right cord where all others have failed. It is an amazing and humbling thought.

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              #7
              Thanks for this, Damer.

              Your discussion reminded me of something my thesis advisor used to say, "Don't try to save the world, it's too large. Focus on a smaller population, what can you change locally?" Granted, this comment was directed at identifying target populations when designing public health programs, but I think it rings true here as well. It is so easy to forget how small actions can result in large changes. Global events make it seem like change is impossible, it seems overwhelming. You can see that changes need to happen, but how exactly can you help? Recently, watching the news I find myself getting frustrated and depressed with it all. It just makes me think, "What's the point?!?"

              Posts such as these help bring everything back into perspective. It reminds me not to focus on trying to save the world, but on positively impacting the lives around us. Small seemingly inconsequential actions such as offering motivation to our fellow bees, letting a friend dump their worries on you over lunch, a friendly smile to a stranger on the street, can make big differences in the lives of that person. Little actions can lead to big changes.

              I really needed this today.

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                #8
                SkorpionUK I feel for you and hang tight. There's not one amongst us who doesn't struggle in some way but some days and some times things can get really bad. We have two choices on those occasions. One, get into a metaphorical black box, isolated, cut-off and totally of no consequence to anyone (up to the end of the 20th century we'd all pretty much done that) or Two. Connect with others, think that even on our worst moments we are no longer really isolated. In DAREBEE we are only a small expression of a much larger global trend but we have become an important one. We never give up and damn it, we also try to make each day a little more fun!

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                  #9
                  We may not be able to "fix " the world but we do not need to add to it's problems.

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                    #10
                    BBCBB totally agreed. Even by having a small footprint in terms of negative impact we help make a difference.

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                      #11
                      This is actually pretty insightful - not that I don't expect you to be, it's just hitting somewhere in me I didn't expect it to when I first started reading.

                      In the end, it's true. For the most part, one individual person or being can't really change the world. There's maybe a few every century or half a century that really come through with defining changes to humanity as a whole, so realistically, none of us are likely to be any of those individuals. Human lives are fleeting and impermanent... But the kind of ideology fostered and maintained at places like here not only can grow through countries, but generations. So many here will teach their children some things they've learned here, I'm sure, as I would if I ever have any. Little people come together with other little people to create huge waves and even those quintessential humanity-forging people are largely affected by and helped by those who are small - whose names might not be remembered like theirs. But I guess in the end, it's not really about being remembered as it is about what's been done. Those who leave marks don't do it because they want their names remembered - it's simply because they can and often feel like they should.

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                        #12
                        LucidBlue like bees We work in small but really important ways.

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                          #13
                          Beautiful post...eloquent, and logical, it reflects what my sappy heart has been contemplating the few weeks I have been here. Large, global, kind, supportive, empathic, hard working, helpful are but a few of the descriptors of The Hive and I have found myself wondering what makes it so. Is it an expectation, is it the type of person drawn here, is it that we are protected by relative anonymity (which usually has the opposite effect)? Regardless, I've found myself wanting to know why it works and how it can be replicated in systems large and small. I do believe this little global hive has the power to make big changes...it does give me hope, humbles me and makes me grateful to share in this community.

                          Thank you so much to the powers that bee .​​​​​

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                            #14
                            Alifun so glad this place is resonating the way it is with you It always makes our day to hear it and, it is a testament to what can be achieved when we simply remove the usual metrics of differentiation (no powers users, no newbies, no special status for any of us in the forum), plus refuse to pass judgement, making this place a safe harbor. It appears that without our usual protective layers of perceived status we are all very much alike after all, and we all want the same things.

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                              #15
                              Damer Yes. Bees to toture Nicolas Cage with.

                              Like so.

                              ... Or just Bees to save the world.

                              ​​​​​​​That works too.

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