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  • TheLibrarian
    replied
    finished:

    Paladin´s Strength (The Saint of Steel #2)

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  • Andi64
    replied
    Quantum of Nightmares by Charles Stross. The 2nd part of the New Management series and a spin-off of the excellent Laundry Files (Magic meets James Bond) series. More of the same as in Dead lies Dreaming, with a Mary Poppins vs. Sweeney Todd touch and a very Strossian view of post modern British working conditions and bureaucracy. Not bad, but I wonder how far this will stretch in the future and if it will come up one joke too thin.

    motionaction If you are not happy with Jim Butcher, give the forementioned Laundry Files a try . The Atrocity Archives and the rest follow a similar concept, but are (imho) way more funnier than the Dresden Files.

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  • motionaction
    replied
    I started reading the Dresden Files books by Jim Butcher.
    Storm Front (#1 of the series) was one of the cringiest books I've ever read but I guess it entertained me on a so-bad-it's-good level.
    Currently reading #2 Fool Moon. I only have a couple of chapters to go. It's a little bit better but also a lot les focused. Still not a fan. I've ordered the first 3 books of the series and I'll move on to the 3rd once I'm done with this but I don't think I'll be continuing with this series.

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  • Lady Celerity
    replied
    I picked up The Last Stormlord by Glenda Larke at the library. It's in the fantasy genre. The author does a great job of world-building. It's set in a desert world where rainfall is regulated and distributed by the stormlords. There is only one stormlord remaining as the others have perished in suspicious circumstances. The current stormlord is slowly dying and unable to keep up with the water demands of the nation. Certain ethnic groups are having their water rations decreased and this results in rebellion and subterfuge. It's a complex and interesting plot, and the characters are well thought out.

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  • Anek
    replied
    "Vergiss Mein Nicht", a random pick from the bookstore bonanza on Saturday, and in German! This must be the second book in German I read without having read an English or Italian translation before. The cover is so nice I just had to buy it
    So far it's really good and funny. I still don't know where it's going which is good!

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  • lofivelcro
    replied
    I've finished Date Night on Union Station by E M Foner. I wanted something funny and lighthearted and Storygraph's algorithm served me this. It's about Earth's ambassador on Union Station (Kelly) who's in her mid thirties and still single, so her friend gets her five dates from an AI controlled dating service that's supposed to find the perfect dates for her.
    It was a bit boring throughout the first half. The humour didn't click, the dialogues between Kelly and her friend Donna seemed clichéd to me and everything seemed forced. But I stuck with it and it got better in the second half, when everything came together.
    I moderately liked it. It was a short and fast read. There are other books in the series and I might read the next one some day to find out what happened to Kelly afterwards, but for now, I'm going to read something else.

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  • Baston
    replied
    Recently finished THE SOFT MACHINE (Burroughs) - I personally loved it, but could easily understand why most other people wouldn't like it. It's foul, offensive, often disgusting, but written with such a bold unique voice I couldn't put it down.

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  • Evelyn
    replied
    Something is Killing the Children

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  • lofivelcro
    replied
    Finished Deltora Quest #1 - The Forests of Silence by Emily Rodda. Yes, I know, it's a children's fantasy book, but after the Postman I wanted a light read. This one was short, kind of exciting and very likeable. Despite the "heroes" being male, I liked that in two critical instances female characters saved them with quick thinking and good reactions. If I had a daughter, I'd probably give that book to her. I'd give it to my son, too, because the male characters show some good character and integrity as well. No idea how the other seven in the series are, but I'm going to find out.

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  • Baston
    replied
    Recently finished PROJECT HAIL MARY (Weir) - I thought this had a good story, but the execution of it is kind of annoying. It's essentially a sci-fi survival story, but told with this gee whiz 1950s affect. There are a lot of exciting, interesting things that happen throughout Weir's 476 pages, but the suspense gets undercut by lines like "I'm going to call this a doohickey, I don't know what else to call it" or "I'm a gosh darn scientist!" I'm not saying it needs to be profanity-laden or anything, but it should at least be believable as adult dialogue/internal monologue... Also, no offense intended, but I don't believe a junior high school science teacher knows all the formulas, astrophysics, chemistry, biology, and biochemistry this protagonist knows. I realize it's a book, and we have to go along with this conceit to read the story, but the protagonist is supposed to be essentially an Everyman - nothing extraordinary about him - and yet he seems to have incredibly in-depth knowledge of every scientific field. (That's just a pet peeve, though.)

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  • lofivelcro
    replied
    I've finished You are a Badass at Making Money by Jen Sincero. It was mentioned here and because I've never read a self-help book on making money, I was curious. I have a vague idea how to make money myself (hard work, taking chances, luck and connections) if you're not outright born into it and can just go from there, so I was wondering if that book would bring anything new to the table.
    Not much surprising, it didn't. Well, there was a lot of crude and trendy language you might like or not, I didn't. The core was pretty much the same, but the author went ahead and told her readers that you don't need luck or connections, but hard work and taking risks. And you have love money. You have to be obsessed with money. And believe in the Universal Intelligence, that wants everyone of us to be happy, awesome, and rich. Tbh, it was the kind of esoteric hype-talk that makes me uncomfortable. Towards the end she got heavy on the "hire a coach" thing, telling how she spent 85.000 $ for a coach, and that turned into a theme of sorts. To my disappointment, stories from other people who got from poor to rich were about people who worked in marketing or consulting and just made the leap into internet marketing, facebook coaching, and basically charisma-based talk-trickery to make money. One person got rich because she found a stack of old stocks for a company she once got for 200$ that now after so many years were worth the exact amount of money she needed for her new business. Talk about luck.
    Like I said, the core principles were there, but hidden under a lot of esoteric money-loving talk and coach-shilling, as well as tons of personal stories and anecdotes. I'm glad I didn't pay money for the book, because I would have felt ripped off.
    In short, I didn't like it. But it had some value for its entertainment, so that's something, I guess.

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  • lofivelcro
    replied
    I've finished The Postman by David Brin and liked it a lot. I'm still pondering the role of females in the book and the society, and what the author wanted to tell with that. I remember seeing the film with Kevin Costner in the cinema, way back with my father and I think it was completely different. I don't remember the super computer from the book and the feminist amazon-scouts. Maybe they weren't in the film? Idk.
    But the book was a good read, emotional at many points, although the second half was a bit weird. Liked the whole 'fake it till you make it' angle and how a lie can grow to become a truth.

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  • Aether
    replied
    Right now I am reading "how to win friends and influence people" in preparation for my new job as a waiter.

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  • EveryWorld
    replied
    Anek Exactly my thought! The 20th anniversary special made me ache for a reread.

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  • Anek
    replied
    EveryWorld
    There is no need for a reason to read Harry Potter. It's always a great idea

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